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Cyber

Defense Information Security Still Fought in the Trenches

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The military is so busy combating cybermarauders that it has not been able to shape an overall strategic approach to securing cyberspace, said the head of intelligence for the Joint Staff. Rear Adm. Elizabeth Train, USN, director for intelligence, J-2, the Joint Staff, told the audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the cyberdomain is a multidimensional attack domain that threatens both the military and the private sector.

“We’re doing more tactical blocking and tackling than strategic defense right now,” Adm. Train said.

She called for a stronger two-way relationship between government and industry as a cornerstone of information sharing. While intruders largely target the private sector, they also are targeting the Defense Department. “We’ve experienced an unprecedented number of incidents,” she said of the department.

One of the challenges is that, in an interdisciplinary mission such as cyber, a gap in technology knowledge is present across the work force. The admiral called for a standard lexicon and vocabulary so that participants can understand each other clearly. For example, she noted, some cyber experts are not experts in intelligence tradecraft, which hampers effective communications in the rapidly changing cyber arena.

“The world is introducing digital capabilities at a pace faster than we can understand them,” the admiral stated.

A New Type of Police Officer Taps Cyber Advantages

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The same challenges facing the military now confront law enforcement as it embraces cyber capabilities. Disciplines ranging from data fusion to security are becoming integral parts of the curriculum for police officers.

Cathy Lanier, chief of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department, did not understate the changes technology has wrought as she spoke at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. “It almost feels like completely reinventing police work,” she said.

With the force using information technology in most aspects of police work, cybersecurity is one of the top priorities for officers. “With all that technology, we have had to re-educate our entire police force and civilians on cybersecurity,” the chief offered. “We’ve had to change the type of employee we go after and teach the current police how to use it.”

Chief Lanier added that training alone is not the only part of the equation. The department must bring its people up to speed on these new technologies, but it also must obtain the policy to go along with it.

Industry Can, Must Do More to Help FBI Cybersecurity Efforts

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Companies that are hacked have valuable information that can help prevent future cyber intrusions, said an FBI cyber expert. Rick McFeely, executive assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch, told the audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the bureau is depending on industry to share vital information on cyber attacks.

“A key part of what the FBI does is victim notification,” McFeely said. “But, by calling out methods used to attack one company, we can see if those methods are being used to attack others. We now do that [a great deal].

“We need you to report it immediately,” he said, addressing industry. “If you share malware, we can tell you how others mitigated the same situation.” He added that the FBI is working to develop a tool that identifies malware’s fingerprints.

One problem the bureau has had with industry is that companies often expect to learn the identity of the intruder. That is not always possible given confidential sources of information, and the FBI discourages firms from seeking that data. “We need to get away from the constant need of private industry to know who’s behind the keyboard,” McFeely states. “We need to worry less about positively identifying [intruders] and focus on their intent and capability. We provide intelligence so you can defend your own networks, not so you can identify where an attack comes from.”

FBI Creates New Cyber Information Sharing Portal

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The FBI has created an information sharing portal for cyber defense modeled on its Guardian counterterrorism portal. Known as iGuardian, the trusted portal represents a new FBI thrust to working more closely with industry on defeating cyberthreats. It is being piloted within the longtime InfraGard portal, according to an FBI cyber expert.

 

Security Measures Need to Raise the Cost of Operations for Hackers

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Hackers need to pay a greater price for intrusions if network security is to be effective, said a former director of national intelligence. Adm. Dennis Blair, USN (Ret.), who also is a former commander of the U.S. Pacific Command, told the audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the nation needs to raise the cost to the hacker without breaking the bank for the defender.

The admiral emphasized that he is not advocating the legalization of counter-cyber attacks—as much as the concept appeals to him. Instead, he called for legalization of “a myriad of nondestructive counter cyber attacks” that would raise the minimal cost to these hackers.

Some measures might involve empowering cyber operators to take action against hackers. Adm. Blair suggested establishing the cyber equivalent of private surveillance cameras with the ability to turn evidence over to the authorities, and maybe even creating the digital equivalent of a citizen’s arrest.

Other defensive measures could thwart cyber marauders. These might take the form of documents that self destruct when unauthorized users try to open them, for example, and the digital equivalent of indelible ink that is used for marking money.

The former head of the U.S. Pacific Command cited China as an example of a cyber adversary that should be impressed with the need for supporting cybersecurity rules and laws. “We need to put more penalties into the equation instead of relying on Chinese maturing,” he offered. “How many U.S. companies must go out of business, how many billions of dollars must be lost, before the Chinese realize it’s in their best interest to cooperate in cybersecurity?”

Financial Incentives May Compel Private Sector Security

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Legislation that creates both positive and negative incentives may be necessary for industry to incorporate effective network security. The role of the insurance industry also can be brought to bear to convince companies it is in their best interest to ensure the sanctity of their data.

These points were offered by Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX). He told the morning audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the government should pursue a private sector approach as part of its efforts to strengthen information security in the United States.

“We need to make cyber a bigger deal at the CEO [chief executive officer] level, and to do that we need to have money involved,” he said. This would include market incentives for companies to secure their information. And, the counterpart would be a financial penalty for those firms that do not pursue adequate security.

“You have to have a stick with those carrots,” he continued. “A company that loses vital data because they didn’t have effective security involved pays a price.”

The congressman added that the insurance industry should be brought into play as well. The government needs to push cyber insurance that establishes minimum requirements and provides discounts for advanced security measures. This might work the same way that auto and home insurers provide discounts for safety technologies.

Congressman Decries “Political Demagogues” Who Threaten Security Measures

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Many elected officials who opposed the National Security Agency’s (NSA’s) broad surveillance efforts were “demagogues” who did not know the real issues involved, said a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX) told the morning audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the people in the House who voted to cut funding for the NSA’s surveillance efforts preferred taking a stand to understanding the situation. Those who voted against cutting the NSA’s funding were the people who’ve been getting the intelligence briefings.

Rep. Thornberry decried the NSA’s opponents as “people who don’t want to go to the briefings, they don’t want their minds to be cluttered by the facts, they just want to feed their Twitter streams.” Those who did attend the briefings understood the scope of the threat and recognized the vital importance of these efforts in protecting the United States.

The NSA controversy provides some guidelines, he continued. It points out that the real challenge is with laws and policies—above all, public confidence. As the threat has grown, policies have not kept up. The country needs an open discussion with as many facts that can be publicized.

“The more we can talk about cyber and intelligence in the open, the better we will be … the less the demagogues can take it and run with it,” the congressman declared.

Senate to Bring Cyber Bill Mirroring House Effort

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Senate is moving on a cyber bill that is more in line with the approach being taken by the House, said a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX) told the morning audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that this bill may be marked up by the Senate Commerce Committee this week. It would turn to standards established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for private sector guidelines.

Thornberry reflected on how the House passed four separate cyber bills a year ago, but they died in the Senate as that body pursued a single large bill. The congressman endorsed the House concept of legislating cybersecurity in “discrete, bite-size chunks” that reach across the relevant government committees and agencies.

The congressman called for greater cooperation between Congress and the White House, saying that this can produce a cyber policy that benefits the nation as a whole. The more the administration and Congress work together, the more their work becomes the policy of the nation rather than that of any particular administration, Republican or Democrat. “Only with this partnership can we have the solutions the country needs,” he declared.

Shifting Numbers Cast Doubt on Federal Data Center Consolidation

July 26, 2013
By Henry S. Kenyon

Government officials now admit they underestimated the scope and complexity of the federal data center realm.

 

Collaborative Portal Opens Business Opportunity Doors

July 18, 2013

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems has created a portal to facilitate collaboration among experts from multiple industries in a secure, controlled, cooperative environment. GDNexus matches innovative solutions to customer requirements across the defense, federal government, intelligence community and commercial markets.

Registered members of the community are notified immediately when new Need Statements are announced and can respond through the portal with products and services that fulfill the requirements. The GDNexus team reviews and evaluates the responses and then sends the potential customers an assessment of the proffered solution.

The team also sends feedback to members to help them enhance their product strategy and align technology road maps to future requirements. Subject matter experts from General Dynamics work directly with technology providers, providing insight and perspective. “GDNexus also provides another important mechanism for us to act as an honest broker, bringing innovative technologies to our customers quickly as a prime systems integrator,” Nadia Short, vice president, strategy and business development, General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, says.

The first customer Need Statements focus on the cyber domain and are now available in the portal. GDNexus member companies currently include NetApp and RSA.

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