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Cyber

Collaborative Portal Opens Business Opportunity Doors

July 18, 2013

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems has created a portal to facilitate collaboration among experts from multiple industries in a secure, controlled, cooperative environment. GDNexus matches innovative solutions to customer requirements across the defense, federal government, intelligence community and commercial markets.

Registered members of the community are notified immediately when new Need Statements are announced and can respond through the portal with products and services that fulfill the requirements. The GDNexus team reviews and evaluates the responses and then sends the potential customers an assessment of the proffered solution.

The team also sends feedback to members to help them enhance their product strategy and align technology road maps to future requirements. Subject matter experts from General Dynamics work directly with technology providers, providing insight and perspective. “GDNexus also provides another important mechanism for us to act as an honest broker, bringing innovative technologies to our customers quickly as a prime systems integrator,” Nadia Short, vice president, strategy and business development, General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, says.

The first customer Need Statements focus on the cyber domain and are now available in the portal. GDNexus member companies currently include NetApp and RSA.

Corporate Espionage Concerns Could Affect Contracting

July 17, 2013

Frank Kendall, undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, told the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee that he is concerned about the level of cyber attacks affecting defense suppliers. As a result, he is considering changes in contracting procedures to mitigate the risk of corporate espionage. “I’m talking particularly about design information that might not be classified, but if you acquire that information, it certainly shortens your lead time to building things, and it reduces your costs,” he told committee members. “That’s an advantage we don’t want to give our potential adversaries.”

Kendall expressed his concerns during his testimony in support of the reauthorization of the Defense Production Act, which grants the president the power to ensure timely procurement of essential services and materials during war or national emergencies. Parts of the act are set to expire on September 30, 2014.

The law is an urgent operational requirement that is as necessary today as it was in 1950 when it was enacted, Kendall said. “Industry has no obligation to prioritize national security requirements, and at times, they’re financially motivated to do otherwise,” he stated. “New, expanded and modernized domestic industrial capabilities reduce the risk of foreign dependencies caused by geopolitical factors or other economic issues and strengthen the economic and technological competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers.”

Subscribe for Cybersecurity Education

July 15, 2013

AFCEA International is partnering with Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute to offer its members a comprehensive range of online cybersecurity training on an annual subscription basis. For the cost of one five-day classroom course, students have unlimited access to more than 30 classes.

Cyber Committee Explores the Insider Threat

July 15, 2013

A new white paper titled “Insider Threat: Protecting U.S. Business Secrets and Sensitive Information” focuses on raising risk awareness by highlighting current issues and outlining continuous challenges.

Asymmetric Cyberwarfare Demands a New Information Assurance Approach

July 1, 2013
By Paul A. Strassmann

The planners of the Defense Department Joint Information Environment, or JIE, must specify the requirements that can cope with the surges in asymmetric cyberwarfare—now. Asymmetric warfare describes conflicts in which the resources of the two belligerents differ in terms of their weapons and organization. The opponents will attempt to exploit each other’s weaknesses.

To defend against asymmetric warfare requires the imposition of a unified intelligence that is applicable to all U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force applications. Proceeding with comprehensive protective solutions is required prior to completing facility consolidations. Fixing applications before consolidating computer processing has become one of the primary requirements for safe cyber operations.

Proceeding with only enhancements of legacy operations will not be sufficient. For example, placing emphasis on data center consolidations without a simultaneous re-engineering of applications cannot deflect targeted cyber attacks.

Cyberwarfare has evolved over the past 40 years. Information security methods, which used to protect computer systems, now are inadequate. Thousands of unknown global cyber attackers examine millions of dispersed targets, but only hundreds of defenders protect tens of thousands of applications located in fixed positions. The disparity between many unknown attackers compared with a few known defenders has created a situation where asymmetric warfare is the prevalent condition under which system operations now take place.

In the Cyber Trenches

July 1, 2013
By Max Cacas

The Army adjusts its training and career path for cyber domain troops and leaders.

The U.S. Army is taking a successful model developed to train chief warrant officers in the realm of information assurance and is adapting it for qualified enlisted personnel and officers. Instead of reinventing the wheel, the program blends already-successful cybersecurity training designed for the private sector with training tailored for the Army’s mission-specific networks. The goal is to create a career path for what is expected to be a cadre of cyberspecialists whose primary goal is to protect and defend the service’s digital infrastructure.

“The Army realized that our networks were being constantly attacked, but we never realized it until after it had taken place,” says Joey Gaspard, chief, Information Assurance Branch, U.S. Army Signal Center at Fort Gordon, Georgia. He adds that in 2007, the service embarked on a program to match staffing and training to be more proactive about cybersecurity. “Instead of consistently sitting there, waiting to be hit, they decided to put themselves in a position where we looked at the training. Commercial industry was already training personnel to defend commercial organizations, so why couldn’t the Army do the same thing?”

In response to that question, the Army embarked on a re-examination of its military occupational specialty (MOS) categories, which describe every job at every rank within the Army. The Signal Center focused on the MOS pertaining to cybersecurity.

Information Agency 
Changes Security Approach

July 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The increasing use of readily available and inexpensive commercial technologies by the military is changing the way the Defense Information Systems Agency provides information assurance. As these technologies are integrated into the Defense Department information infrastructure, the agency is adjusting its approaches to providing security for its networks and the data that reside on them.

Future Is Bright for U.S. 
Information Assurance

July 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

While many cybersecurity experts preach the gloom and doom of more advanced adversaries attacking U.S. networks, one government official contends that U.S. network defenders can meet the challenge. Training, education and technological improvements are showing dividends in a better-prepared cyber workforce.

Sharing the 
Secrets of 
Cybersecurity

July 1, 2013
By Rita Boland

Protection is as much about 
who you know as what you know.

The tasks critical to success in the realm of information assurance have become so robust that a breadth of expertise is now necessary to stop cybercriminals. To that end, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, opened a new research facility called the Cyber Engineering Research Laboratory to promote the collaboration required to safeguard networks. An accessible external location, coupled with a synergistic internal mindset, enables advancements and maturity of concepts essential to success in the cyber realm.

Unlike most of the larger laboratory that sits in a secure, restricted area, the smaller subordinate one is located in the open Sandia Science and Technology Park to facilitate access for private sector, university and other nonlaboratory personnel. Inside the facility, researchers from the disparate fields of cognitive science, network defense and analytics are working together to find solutions to cyberchallenges. “That’s a very powerful effect from a cross fertilization standpoint,” says Ben Cook, an acting senior manager in Sandia’s Information and Cognitive Sciences Group. Permanent staff at the Cyber Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) include established employees from other parts of the laboratory as well as incoming researchers.

Shifting Tides of Cyber

July 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

Industry officials foresee 
changes in network security.

Cyber industry experts predict a number of coming developments in the cyber realm, driven in part by government strategy and funding uncertainties. The future may include a greater reliance on law enforcement to solve state-sponsored hacks, increased automation and more outsourcing.

Earlier this year, the White House released the Administration’s Strategy on Mitigating the Theft of U.S. Trade Secrets. It calls for an increase in diplomatic engagement; makes investigation and prosecution of trade secret thievery a top priority; and promises a review of legislation regarding trade secret theft to determine what changes may be necessary. The strategy contains “lots of hints” the administration will rely on law enforcement in addition to national security channels in some cases involving nation-state-sponsored hacks, says Kimberly Peretti, a former senior litigator for the Justice Department Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section.

“The big gorilla in the room is what we do with state-sponsored attacks. One of the priorities of the strategy itself is having the Justice Department continue to make investigations and prosecutions of trade secrets a priority. So, if we see a lot of these trade secret thefts happening by Chinese hackers or state-sponsored attackers, that could be incorporated into the strategy—to start looking at pursuing avenues criminally as well as on the national security side,” says Peretti, who is now a partner in the White Collar Group and co-chair of the Security Incident Management and Response Team, Alston and Bird Limited Liability Partnership, a law firm headquartered in Atlanta.

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