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Cyber

Guest Blog: Cyber Trading Posts Ignite the Spark in Public-Private Collaboration

July 31, 2014
By Jessica Gulick

Partnerships are growing from disparate groups in search of the same goal.

Cybersecurity Challenges Vex Planners, Responders

August 1, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The price of failure to provide adequate cybersecurity ultimately may be too high for any nation to tolerate. Yet, the cost of effective cybersecurity may be too much for a nation to afford.

National Labs and Industry Partner to Train Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity Specialists

July 14, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory join Bechtel BNI to train a new class of cyberdefense professionals. The program is designed to allow the national labs to recruit and rapidly develop cybersecurity specialists who can guide research at their respective institutions and create solutions that meet the cyberdefense needs of private industry.

Cryptography Advisory Group Addresses NIST Ties to NSA

July 14, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) primary external advisory board today announced a report calling for the agency to increase its staff of cryptography experts and to implement more explicit processes for ensuring openness and transparency to strengthen its cryptography efforts. In making its recommendations, the Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT) specifically addressed NIST’s interactions with the National Security Agency (NSA).

Cyber Operations Centers of Academic Excellence List Expands

July 14, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The National Security Agency has added five schools to the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Operations Program.

Nearly 70 Percent of Critical Infrastructure Providers' Information Systems Have Been Breached in Past Year

July 10, 2014
By Maryann Lawlor

Only 6 percent of power and water companies say they provide cybersecurity training to all employees.

Data Restrictions Cause Europe to Lag in Research Efforts

August 1, 2014
By Rita Boland

Mining big data for salient information points presents a plethora of challenges, but in Europe a different issue with the action has emerged as a concern. Regulations prohibiting researchers and others from searching through the data in certain documents are putting countries on the continent at a competitive disadvantage in a number of fields, studies are revealing. With several economies there already in dire straits, the legal encumbrances could add to difficulties in improving financial situations.

The report, “Standardisation in the Area of Innovation and Technological Development, Notably in the Field of Text and Data Mining” lays out the problems of restricting mining in texts. It explains that because text- and data-mining technology is relatively affordable, it is available even to individual and small-organization researchers. The document was produced by an expert group appointed by the European Commission. That government body or its departments establish these groups to provide advice and expertise. They include at least six public- and/or private-sector members who meet more than once.

The personnel chosen for this particular task write in their report that “There is growing recognition that we are at the threshold of the mass automation of service industries (automation of thinking) comparable with the robotic automation of manufacturing production lines (automation of muscle) in an earlier era. [Text and data mining] will be widely used to provide insights in the redesign of this digital services economy. When it comes to the deployment of [text and data mining], there are worrying signs that European researchers may be falling behind, especially with regard to researchers in the United States.”

Multiple Thrusts Define Geospatial Agency Big Data Efforts

August 1, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

Technology innovations, new roles and expanding missions are shaping the move toward big data in the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. A mix of tradecraft and technology is ensuing as the agency evolves from an organization that always has worked with voluminous imagery files to one in which big data represents a goal that promises to change many aspects of intelligence.

David Bottom is the director of the information technology services directorate at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). He explains that, with its imagery library, the NGA has been generating and using large data files for some time. Imagery resolution, file complexity and the number of files continue to increase. Bottom allows that the agency must transition from dealing in large data files to incorporating the concept of big data. “There is a lot of information in those large data files that you could consider to be big data,” he offers. “So how do we actually transition the agency—not just to being a large data file provider, but to that big data environment where there is a lot going on in those image files?”

Big data is not fundamentally changing the NGA’s mission, Bottom states. The capability does allow the agency to function as a foundation for integrated intelligence. It also provides increased capabilities in terms of being able to deliver a better product more quickly. “If those data points—and their relationships—are portrayed in time and space in a way that enables the user to quickly make sense of something, that is the power,” he declares.

U.S. Army Explores Push-Button Networking

August 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army’s current tactical network delivers a wide range of capabilities for warfighters, including unprecedented communications on the move. But the complexity can overwhelm commanders who have countless critical tasks to complete and soldiers’ lives in their hands. Future tactical networks will automate many processes and may be smart enough to advise commanders, similar to JARVIS, Iron Man’s computerized assistant.

The Army’s current networking technology includes Capability Set 13, a package of network components, associated equipment and software that provides an integrated capability from the tactical operations center to the dismounted soldier. It supports Army warfighters in Afghanistan and provides a host of capabilities not offered by the wide area network in use as recently as 2012. The Army has fielded the capability set down to the company commander level with a package known as the Soldier Network Extension, which delivers some challenges along with the added capabilities. “The company commander is trying to maneuver around the battlefield, and he’s trying to command a company, and he has these new pieces of kit that he has to learn how to use, and it’s complicated. That’s part of the problem,” says Jennifer Zbozny, chief engineer for the Army Program Executive Office for Command, Control and Communications-Tactical. “If you had an iPhone with an interface you didn’t understand, and you had to do a million things and log on a million different ways, you’d probably get tired of it and decide it’s not worth the effort.”

McLaughlin Named Deputy Commander, U.S. Cyber Command

July 8, 2014

Maj. Gen. James K. McLaughlin, USAF, has been nominated for appointment to the rank of lieutenant general and for assignment as deputy commander, U.S. Cyber Command, at Fort Meade, Maryland. McLaughlin is currently serving as commander, 24th Air Force, Air Force Space Command; and commander, Air Forces Cyber, U.S. Cyber Command, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, according to a Defense Department press release.

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