Search:  

 Blog     e-Newsletter       Resource Library      Directories      Webinars
AFCEA logo
 

Intelligence

FBI Creates New Cyber Information Sharing Portal

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The FBI has created an information sharing portal for cyber defense modeled on its Guardian counterterrorism portal. Known as iGuardian, the trusted portal represents a new FBI thrust to working more closely with industry on defeating cyberthreats. It is being piloted within the longtime InfraGard portal, according to an FBI cyber expert.

 

Security Measures Need to Raise the Cost of Operations for Hackers

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Hackers need to pay a greater price for intrusions if network security is to be effective, said a former director of national intelligence. Adm. Dennis Blair, USN (Ret.), who also is a former commander of the U.S. Pacific Command, told the audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the nation needs to raise the cost to the hacker without breaking the bank for the defender.

The admiral emphasized that he is not advocating the legalization of counter-cyber attacks—as much as the concept appeals to him. Instead, he called for legalization of “a myriad of nondestructive counter cyber attacks” that would raise the minimal cost to these hackers.

Some measures might involve empowering cyber operators to take action against hackers. Adm. Blair suggested establishing the cyber equivalent of private surveillance cameras with the ability to turn evidence over to the authorities, and maybe even creating the digital equivalent of a citizen’s arrest.

Other defensive measures could thwart cyber marauders. These might take the form of documents that self destruct when unauthorized users try to open them, for example, and the digital equivalent of indelible ink that is used for marking money.

The former head of the U.S. Pacific Command cited China as an example of a cyber adversary that should be impressed with the need for supporting cybersecurity rules and laws. “We need to put more penalties into the equation instead of relying on Chinese maturing,” he offered. “How many U.S. companies must go out of business, how many billions of dollars must be lost, before the Chinese realize it’s in their best interest to cooperate in cybersecurity?”

Financial Incentives May Compel Private Sector Security

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Legislation that creates both positive and negative incentives may be necessary for industry to incorporate effective network security. The role of the insurance industry also can be brought to bear to convince companies it is in their best interest to ensure the sanctity of their data.

These points were offered by Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX). He told the morning audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the government should pursue a private sector approach as part of its efforts to strengthen information security in the United States.

“We need to make cyber a bigger deal at the CEO [chief executive officer] level, and to do that we need to have money involved,” he said. This would include market incentives for companies to secure their information. And, the counterpart would be a financial penalty for those firms that do not pursue adequate security.

“You have to have a stick with those carrots,” he continued. “A company that loses vital data because they didn’t have effective security involved pays a price.”

The congressman added that the insurance industry should be brought into play as well. The government needs to push cyber insurance that establishes minimum requirements and provides discounts for advanced security measures. This might work the same way that auto and home insurers provide discounts for safety technologies.

Congressman Decries “Political Demagogues” Who Threaten Security Measures

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Many elected officials who opposed the National Security Agency’s (NSA’s) broad surveillance efforts were “demagogues” who did not know the real issues involved, said a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX) told the morning audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum in the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that the people in the House who voted to cut funding for the NSA’s surveillance efforts preferred taking a stand to understanding the situation. Those who voted against cutting the NSA’s funding were the people who’ve been getting the intelligence briefings.

Rep. Thornberry decried the NSA’s opponents as “people who don’t want to go to the briefings, they don’t want their minds to be cluttered by the facts, they just want to feed their Twitter streams.” Those who did attend the briefings understood the scope of the threat and recognized the vital importance of these efforts in protecting the United States.

The NSA controversy provides some guidelines, he continued. It points out that the real challenge is with laws and policies—above all, public confidence. As the threat has grown, policies have not kept up. The country needs an open discussion with as many facts that can be publicized.

“The more we can talk about cyber and intelligence in the open, the better we will be … the less the demagogues can take it and run with it,” the congressman declared.

Senate to Bring Cyber Bill Mirroring House Effort

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Senate is moving on a cyber bill that is more in line with the approach being taken by the House, said a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX) told the morning audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that this bill may be marked up by the Senate Commerce Committee this week. It would turn to standards established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for private sector guidelines.

Thornberry reflected on how the House passed four separate cyber bills a year ago, but they died in the Senate as that body pursued a single large bill. The congressman endorsed the House concept of legislating cybersecurity in “discrete, bite-size chunks” that reach across the relevant government committees and agencies.

The congressman called for greater cooperation between Congress and the White House, saying that this can produce a cyber policy that benefits the nation as a whole. The more the administration and Congress work together, the more their work becomes the policy of the nation rather than that of any particular administration, Republican or Democrat. “Only with this partnership can we have the solutions the country needs,” he declared.

Hooked on Mobile 
Security

July 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

Project Fishbowl spurs industry to
 meet military
 and intelligence 
community needs.

U.S. intelligence and defense officials are wrapping up a mobile device pilot program known as the Fishbowl project and are planning over the next year to expand on the capabilities it provides. Doing so is part of a larger strategy to wean the agency and the Defense Department off of government-designed mobile device technology, which will save time and money while providing secure, cutting-edge electronics for high-level government officials and to individual soldiers.

Fishbowl provided 100 Android devices to users across 25 organizations. The name is a reference to the fact that fishbowl users are a closed community capable of talking only to one another on the device, which provides secure voice and data services including email, calendar and some chat capability. “These are all Web-mediated services. We don’t store data directly on the device. It acts as a thin client back to the enterprise so that if the device gets lost, there’s very little data that can be obtained from the device itself,” says Troy Lange, National Security Agency (NSA) senior executive for the mobility mission. The NSA is teamed with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) on the project.

The next step is for DISA to implement an operational capability that will replace the pilot. DISA also will establish a government-owned app store that will add to the catalogue of available software applications for mobile products.

Data Collectors Increase Intelligence

June 27, 2013

Robots slightly shorter than the average human may be able to connect portions of the offline world to the online world digitally. Knightscope Incorporated will soon be testing the K5 and K10 robots, which can autonomously prowl through large areas and small spaces, collecting significant amounts of data from their immediate surroundings. Applications include perimeter surveillance of military bases and inspection of power plants.

An integrated machine operating system autonomously guides each robot through defined boundary conditions; the sensor operating system collects data from the immediate surroundings. During beta testing scheduled for the end of this year, this data will be fed into the company’s network operations center. Use of the robots will be offered to customers through a machine-as-a-service subscription business model.

The K5 and K10 feature omnidirectional cameras, microphones, optical character recognition, thermal imaging and air quality detection.

Intelligence Taps Industry for Essential Technologies

May 22, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

James Bond’s U.S. counterpart may be equipped more with commercial technologies than with systems developed in intelligence community laboratories. The private sector will be called upon to provide even more capabilities to help keep the intelligence community ahead of adversaries and budget cuts.

The Bottom Line: The DOD Must Be a Squeaky Wheel

May 15, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

It’s time for military leaders, and yes, even members of the intelligence community, to come out from behind the curtain. They not only need to share with the public what networks and radios and tanks and guns mean to a warfighter’s safety but also what they mean to global security.

National Intelligence Writing Contest Underway

May 15, 2013

AFCEA International and the Naval Intelligence Professionals (NIP) are sponsoring a national intelligence writing contest that offers a top prize of $3,000 and a three-year membership in both organizations.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Intelligence