International

March 20, 2014

Aviation Training Consulting LLC, Altus, Okla., is being awarded a $24,988,000 firm-fixed-price contract to provide instructional services in support of the KC-130J aircraft for the government of Kuwait under the Foreign Military Sales program. Services include instruction on operating the KC-130J simulators and aircraft. Work will be performed at Kuwait City, Kuwait and Cherry Point, N.C., and is expected to be completed in March 2017. The Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, Orlando, Fla., is the contracting office (N61340-14-C-0007).

April 1, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The rise of new global flashpoints along with a strategic rebalancing are presenting the U.S. Navy with a new set of challenges and obligations concurrent with significant force reductions. The sum of the budget cuts would be enough to tax the service under any circumstances, but they are being implemented against a backdrop of a broader mission set and increased activities by potential foes.

April 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers
Albanian soldiers are attacked in a simulated riot during training at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany. Researchers working with the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency use open source intelligence to predict social upheaval events.

Researchers working on behalf of the U.S. intelligence agencies can use reams of open source, anonymous data to foretell social turmoil such as disease outbreaks or international political unrest. Once fully developed, the capability to predict coming events may allow U.S. officials to more effectively respond to public health threats; to improve embassy security before an imminent attack; or to more quickly and effectively respond to humanitarian crises.

March 17, 2014

The U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center awarded Lockheed Martin a $9 million foreign military sales contract to support the Republic of Korea’s Peace Krypton reconnaissance aircraft system. The Peace Krypton system is used for tactical intelligence and is comprised of militarized business jets and ground stations that process data from the aircraft. Lockheed Martin’s sustainment work scope involves maintenance of the aircraft fleet, which includes spare and repair parts, as well as providing support and test equipment for both the aircraft and its fixed and mobile ground stations.

March 14, 2014

DRS Technical Services Inc., Herndon, Va., was awarded a $30,271,266 hybrid firm-fixed price, cost-plus fixed-fee and cost reimbursable multi-year contract to operate control and maintain satellite communications between the continental United States and worldwide locations. It will also provide help desk and field operations support. Work will be performed in Rock Island, Ill., Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Germany. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity (W52P1J-14-C-0026).

March 7, 2014
By Jim Sweeney

Gen. Tom Lawson, RCAF, chief of the Defence Staff, outlined four priorities for the Canadian Armed Forces in a speech last month at the Centre for International Governance Innovation. The highest priority is delivering excellence in operations. That is followed, Gen. Lawson said, by preparing the armed forces for tomorrow’s challenges, providing warfighters with training and professional development, and caring for warfighters and their families.

February 24, 2014

Engility Corp., Chantilly, Va., is being awarded a $39,969,545 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for electronic warfare (EW) weapons systems modifications for U.S. Navy and Australian EA-6B, EA-18G, E-2C, MH-60R, BAMS, P-8A aircraft, Unmanned Air Systems, flight simulators, training systems, other advanced electronic attack derivatives and initiatives.

February 14, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman
(r-l) Capt. Dale Rielage, USN; Capt. Stuart Belt, USN; Capt. David A. Adams, USN; Capt. James Fanell, USN; Dr. James R. Holmes; and panel moderator Rear Adm. James G. Foggo III, USN, exchange views in a panel titled “What About China?”

Internal change may be the key to managing external change as the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Coast Guard enter a new era of limited budgets and unlimited global challenges. From research and development to acquisition, these services are looking toward changing methods and technologies to keep the force viable and accomplish their missions. Meanwhile, a range of adversaries continue striving to find and exploit weaknesses in U.S. capabilities and operations.

February 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The threat of armed conflict arising from China’s disputed assertions of territorial claims could be defused if all parties concerned agree to use international law institutions, said a U.S. Navy attorney. Capt Stuart Bell, USN, deputy assistant judge advocate general (international and operations law), told a Thursday panel audience at West 2014 in San Diego that the rule of law can be applied in most cases involving disputes between China and its neighbors to achieve a peaceful resolution.

March 1, 2014
By Kent R. Schneider

Even though the Cold War has ended and the monolithic threat against the West has disappeared, the relationship between Europe and the United States remains vital. Europe includes some of the United States’ strongest coalition partners and alliances; the two economies are closely tied and interdependent; and defense and security in Europe are evolving rapidly, just as in the United States. AFCEA chapters and members outside the United States number the greatest in Europe.

March 1, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman
Romanian land forces conduct a patrol in Afghanistan, where they have served as part of the International Security Assistance Force. As a member of NATO, Romania is modernizing its military to fulfill a role as a regional security force.

Romania has opted to extend its force modernization period rather than cut important purchases as it deals with its version of the global budget crisis. Despite suffering from the severe economic downturn that began more than five years ago, the Black Sea country continues to upgrade its military with the goal of being a significant security force in an uncertain region.

March 1, 2014
By Rita Boland
HMS Dragon’s Lynx helicopter fires infrared flares during an exercise over the Type 45 destroyer.

The U.K. Royal Navy has re-established itself as a world-class force in the area of maritime air defense through the launch of its new destroyers, the most advanced ships the British ever have sent to sea. The latest of the vessels recently returned from its maiden deployment, proving not only the capabilities of its class but also its own flexibility and adaptability.

March 1, 2014
By Rita Boland
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) directorate is involved in a multilayer security approach to protecting U.S. interests.

Homeland security officials are battling privacy and technology issues amid the new social media era that offers both challenges and opportunities. Just as new technologies and information sharing architectures have improved interagency data sharing, new sources of potentially valuable information have emerged to vex planners who must handle technical obstacles and personal rights.

March 1, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman
Students peer at computer screens as part of a COE DAT course in cyberspace attacks. As cyberspace becomes a more useful tool for terrorists, the COE DAT is increasing its work to identify how terrorists use it and to inform alliance partners on these new aspects.

NATO’s efforts to defend against terrorism now are focusing on cyberspace as a tool of terrorists instead of merely as a vulnerability for striking at alliance nations and their critical infrastructure. These efforts cover aspects of cyber exploitation that range from understanding terrorists’ behavior to how they might use social media.

March 1, 2014
By Henry S. Kenyon

Europe’s defense markets have been contracting for the past decade because of the continent’s financial crisis and national priorities shifting away from military spending. But while fewer tanks and fighter jets are being acquired, money is being spent on modernizing computers and communications equipment—a trend that will continue into the foreseeable future, according to an industry analyst.

February 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The budget reductions that will be a fact of military life for the foreseeable future promise to impel dramatic changes in force structure and military operations. Ongoing needs such as high technology and overseas commitments offer the possibility of being both challenges and solutions, as planners endeavor to plan around a smaller but, hopefully, more capable force.

February 12, 2014

L-3 Communications Corp., Communication Systems West, Salt Lake City, Utah, has been awarded a $17,919,946 delivery order (0003) on an existing firm-fixed-price and cost-reimbursable contract (FA8620-13-G-4051) for supply of Satellite Communications Terminals, Test and Monitor Sub-Systems, Satellite Earth Terminal Sub-Systems (SETTS) Site Monitor and Radomes for the United States, United Kingdom and France. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Medium Altitude Unmanned Aircraft Systems, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.

February 10, 2014

Elbit Systems Ltd., Haifa, Israel, announced today that it was awarded an Israeli Ministry of Defense contract, in the amount of approximately $23 million, for the operation and maintenance of its ground simulators in use by the Israeli ground forces. The 5-year contract includes a variety of simulators, both fixed and mobile, dedicated to training for tanks, armored combat vehicles, driving simulators, intelligence training and other applications.
 

February 10, 2014

Thales has signed a five-year contract with the United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defence to provide support for the Sonar 2050 anti-submarine sensor used on the Royal Navy’s Type 23 frigate fleet. Sonar 2050 is a medium-range bow sonar currently fitted to thirteen Type 23 frigates and is the Royal Navy’s primary hull-mounted anti- submarine warfare sensor. It also provides the ship with passive detection capabilities at lower frequencies.

February 7, 2014

Raytheon Co., McKinney, Texas, was awarded a $16,286,396 firm-fixed-price, foreign military sales contract for 22 modified improved target acquisition systems for the Royal Saudi Land Forces SWORD program and three for the Saudi Arabian National Guard. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-14-C-0066).

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