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Small Business

New World Solutions to Support Remote Sensing Science

September 23, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
New World Solutions Inc., Herndon, Va., was awarded a $35,748,885 cost-plus-fixed-fee, non-option-eligible, non-multi-year contract to provide the National Guard Intelligence Center with applied remote sensing image science support. The U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (Charlottesville), Charlottesville, Va., is the contracting activity (W911W5-13-D-0001).

Silvus Technologies to Research Beamforming Antenna Technology

September 16, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Silvus Technologies Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., has been awarded an small business incentive research Phase II contract from the Air Force Research Laboratory to design and build a digital beamforming antenna array for airborne applications. This contract award is a result of a successful Phase I feasibility study that Silvus Technologies conducted under small business incentive research topic # AF131-038. The total dollar amount of the award including Phase I and Phase II is $900,000. Under this two-year contract, Silvus Technologies will build a digital beamforming antenna array for airborne and ground applications and demonstrate electronic tracking of multiple simultaneous transmit and receive beams to and from airborne assets and the ability to adaptively null out interferers. This program lays the foundation for a low size, weight, power and cooling directional antenna technology that can be mounted on small, unmanned aerial vehicles.

Navy Surfs the Crowd

August 20, 2013

 

The U.S. Navy is turning to crowdsourcing as a possible situational awareness aid during disasters and social unrest. Data from eyewitnesses or participants would be fused with information from other sources to provide timely understanding and appreciation of an environment or location to response teams.

During the first phase of the Crowdsourcing Situational Awareness (Crowd-SA) project, a technical approach is being developed and prototype software will be demonstrated using simulated data. The goal is to design text analysis tools that extract events and entities in context, using language and patterns typically found in social media settings. This data would then be adjusted to improve fusion with information from non-crowdsourcing resources by using distributed cloud-based computing methods for processing the disparate data simultaneously.

Modus Operandi is developing the phase one software under a Small Business Innovation Research contract.

Federal Budget Cuts
 Encourage a Niche Business

August 1, 2013
By Michael A. Robinson

With the nation facing a new atmosphere of austerity and mandated budget cuts, now would seem to be the absolute worst time to target the federal government for defense-related technology contracts. Yet, for one business, tight government funding is more of an opportunity than a challenge.

After all, the Pentagon faces two massive fiscal challenges. The first is the new lean approach to defense spending following the U.S. military’s withdrawal from Iraq and its preparation to draw down forces from Afghanistan. The second deals with today’s complex political realities. Unable to fashion a bipartisan spending plan, Congress has allowed the process known as “sequestration” to kick in. Those automatic budget cuts are expected to take more than $40 billion out of Defense Department spending this year alone for a reduction of more than 7 percent.

And yet, Timothy Coffin is all smiles as he prepares to pick up more federal information technology contracts. A former U.S. Air Force officer, Coffin serves as president of iGATE Government Solutions, a wholly owned unit of information technology provider iGATE Corporation. As Coffin sees it, the era of tight Pentagon budgets actually provides a great growth opportunity for a contractor that understands the overarching theme of today’s spending environment.

Facing both financial and political headwinds, federal agencies have to take a more creative approach to managing their programs and cash flows. That means they no longer can continue to rely on the same old approaches that have served them for decades.

“I am pretty excited about some of the opportunities I see,” Coffin says. “I’m not going after the $10 million opportunities; I’m going after the $100 million, $200 million opportunities, and we’re getting quite a bit of interest from the government in what we consider our value propositions.

Sandia Speeds Intellectual Property Sharing With Small Business

July 29, 2013

To facilitate innovation development, Sandia National Laboratories is building a portfolio of intellectual property (IP) that businesses can license in as little as an hour. The ready-to-sign licenses feature simplified language and pared-down terms, conditions and reporting requirements. Up-front fees are in the $3,000 range, and royalty percentages are low.

Sandia has approximately 1,300 patents available for licensing, and while large companies often take advantage of this IP, small firms often do not have the human or financial resources to seize the opportunity. The new license procedure enables entrepreneurs to click on one link and download all of the information they need. The licenses are nonexclusive, so any number of companies can make use of the technology.

“These are all technologies that no one has licensed in areas where small businesses might be able to get a foothold,” Bob Westervelt, business development specialist, Sandia, says. “A small company could take any of these licenses and run with it.” Currently, eight patents qualify for the program, but Sandia officials say the portfolio could reach up to 50. Additional information about Sandia technology transfer opportunities is available online.

Shifting Tides of Cyber

July 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

Industry officials foresee 
changes in network security.

Cyber industry experts predict a number of coming developments in the cyber realm, driven in part by government strategy and funding uncertainties. The future may include a greater reliance on law enforcement to solve state-sponsored hacks, increased automation and more outsourcing.

Earlier this year, the White House released the Administration’s Strategy on Mitigating the Theft of U.S. Trade Secrets. It calls for an increase in diplomatic engagement; makes investigation and prosecution of trade secret thievery a top priority; and promises a review of legislation regarding trade secret theft to determine what changes may be necessary. The strategy contains “lots of hints” the administration will rely on law enforcement in addition to national security channels in some cases involving nation-state-sponsored hacks, says Kimberly Peretti, a former senior litigator for the Justice Department Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section.

“The big gorilla in the room is what we do with state-sponsored attacks. One of the priorities of the strategy itself is having the Justice Department continue to make investigations and prosecutions of trade secrets a priority. So, if we see a lot of these trade secret thefts happening by Chinese hackers or state-sponsored attackers, that could be incorporated into the strategy—to start looking at pursuing avenues criminally as well as on the national security side,” says Peretti, who is now a partner in the White Collar Group and co-chair of the Security Incident Management and Response Team, Alston and Bird Limited Liability Partnership, a law firm headquartered in Atlanta.

AFCEA Answers Radio Show Premieres in June

May 15, 2013

As it becomes more challenging for AFCEA members to network via conferences, the association is finding innovative ways to facilitate connectivity, engage its members, boost conversations and share information. AFCEA Answers is the latest way the association is reaching out by taking to the airwaves and the Internet.

Small Business Outreach Event

May 15, 2013

AFCEA International is hosting a presentation by Tony Constable, president, CAI/SISCo, at 4 p.m. on May 21, 2013, at AFCEA headquarters, Fairfax, Virginia. Constable will explain the fundamentals of Price To Win (PTW), his business development discipline that helps companies win contracts particularly in austere times.

Corporate Membership Deal: Only Two Weeks Left

June 17, 2013

Companies that join AFCEA or renew at the three-year level receive the third year free. This offer saves organizations hundreds and even thousands of dollars yet still provides complete membership benefits.

 

Guest Blog: Budget Impact on Developing COTS Systems

March 25, 2013
By Michael Carter

The current driving force in the military and defense environment is to keep legacy systems operating longer, or the replacement of legacy systems with new systems that emulate one or more legacy systems with commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology. However, there is insufficient budget to fund development of these COTS systems, and the burden of development falls upon private industry. The current sequestration environment adds another burden on industry to perform to the needs of the military, but without the benefit of nonrecurring engineering (NRE) costs being reimbursed. Programs although already funded (but not the NRE, as it is not initially funded) are being put on hold, cancelled, or are in a state of non-deterministic outcome.

Military and defense program managers and private industry face an uphill battle to find the intersection of needs, available resources and the expenditure of development costs. Small companies are at a distinct disadvantage when they develop technology to support the replacement of legacy systems when they are forced to use their own development resources without compensation and are not awarded a contract for production.

Whether a fixed-price, cost-plus, or IDIQ contract, the above scenario is increasingly commonplace in the face of budget constraints and sequestration. The burden on small companies doesn’t stop there; military program managers are also demanding engineering support without compensation for engineering-sustaining efforts, again without the presence of a production contract.

Although many systems are characterized as COTS, there are demands on the developer to perform military environment qualification testing, again without funding and no guarantee of a production contract.

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