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sensors

Technology Service to Develop Survivability Sensors

April 19, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Technology Service Corp., Silver Spring, Md., was awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract with a maximum value of $19 million for the development of a route optimization for survivability against sensors system. The Army Contracting Command, Fort Eustis, Va., is the contracting activity. 

Sage to Engineer Advanced Sensors

April 17, 2013
George I. Seffers

Sage Management Enterprise LLC, Columbia, Md., is being awarded a $7,955,374 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for advanced multi-integration sensor engineering reports.This contract provides advanced systems engineering, research, and analysis of sensors, networks, and ground stations spanning multiple disciplines to enable the future fielding of operational capabilities. The scope of this effort shall include requirements development and management for sensors, develop system specifications and interface standards, develop data standards and concepts of operation.The effort will also perform the necessary research and analysis to perform sensor capability comparisons, capability based planning, development of project scoring methodologies and prioritization of sensor initiatives that align to collection requirements.The contracting activity is Air Force Research Laboratory/RIKD, Rome, N.Y.

Raytheon Receives Additional Sensor Netting System Funding

April 17, 2013
George I. Seffers

Raytheon Co., Largo, Fla., is being awarded a $30,020,420 cost-plus-fixed-fee and cost-only modification to previously awarded contract for design agent and engineering services in support of the Cooperative Engagement Capabilities (CEC) program. The CEC is a sensor netting system that significantly improves battle force anti-air warfare capability by extracting and distributing sensor-derived information such that the superset of this data is available to all participating CEC units. CEC improves battle force effectiveness by improving overall situational awareness and by enabling longer range, cooperative, multiple, or layered engagement strategies. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Lockheed to Provide Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures Sensors

April 5, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Lockheed Martin Corp., Marietta, Ga., is being awarded a $7,340,724 contract modification for incorporation of Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) NexGen Sensors onto HC/MC-130J aircraft. The contracting activity is the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. 

Advanced Capabilities Required for Future Navy Warfighting

April 4, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Future conflicts likely will be fought in degraded information technology environments, which will require the U.S. Navy to develop and exploit new capabilities to continue to operate in contested cyberspace. Technologies such as a flexible information grid, assured timing services and directed energy weapons must be part of the naval information system arsenal if the sea service is to maintain information dominance through the year 2028.

These were just a few of the findings presented in the Navy’s Information Dominance Roadmap 2013-2028, which was released in late March. Presented by Rear Adm. William E. Leigher, USN, the Navy’s director of warfighter integration, the report outlines the growing challenges facing the fleet and how the Navy must meet them.

The report divides information dominance challenges into three areas: assured command and control (C2), battlespace awareness and integrated fires. While the United States will continue to maintain supremacy in those areas, that supremacy is shrinking as more nations are closing the gap between U.S. capabilities and the ability to disrupt them.

Among the advanced capabilities the Navy will require toward the end of the next decade is assured electromagnetic spectrum access. Achieving this will entail fielding greater numbers of advanced line-of-sight communication systems; being able to monitor combat system operational status and adjust it using automated services; having a real-time spectrum operations capability that enables dynamic monitoring and control of spectrum emissions; and generating a common operational picture of the spectrum that is linked to electronic navigation charts and displays operational restrictions.

NAVMAR to Develop Advanced Sensors for Special Operations Command

April 3, 2013
George I. Seffers

NAVMAR Applied Sciences Corp., Warminster, Pa., is being awarded a $17,970,662 cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order against a previously issued basic ordering agreement for engineering, integration, system maintenance/repair services, and training for the continued development of advanced sensors and systems in support of naval aviation missions of the Special Operations Command. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J., is the contracting activity.

L-3 to Provide Submarine Sensor Mast System

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
L-3 KEO, Northampton, Mass., is being awarded a $13,396,095 firm-fixed-price modification to previously awarded contract for the production of 16 universal modular masts (UMM), a non-hull penetrating mast that is installed on Virginia class submarines and serves as a lifting mechanism for five different sensors including the Photonics Mast Program, high data rate mast, multi-functional mast, multi-functional modular mast and integrated electronic support measures mast. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity. 

Consolidation Is 
the Course for Army 
Electronic Warfare

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Melding the disciplines of spectrum combat will enable greater flexibility and more capabilities.

The growth in battlefield electronics has spurred a corresponding growth in electronic warfare. In the same manner that innovative technologies have spawned new capabilities, electronic warfare is becoming more complex as planners look to incorporate new systems into the battlespace.

No longer can electronic warfare (EW) function exclusively in its own domain. The growth of cyber operations has led to an overlap into traditional EW areas. EW activities for countering remote-controlled improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Southwest Asia led to an increased emphasis on EW defense and offense. It also exposed the problem of signal fratricide when those EW operations interfered with allied communication.

The U.S. Army sped many systems into theater, and now it is working to coordinate those technologies into a more organized capability. The effort focuses on an integrated EW approach that will reconcile many of the existing conflicts and clear the way for more widespread use of EW in future conflicts.

“The Army definitely has wrapped its arms around the importance of EW,” declares Col. Joe DuPont, USA, project manager for electronic warfare at the Program Executive Office (PEO) Intelligence Electronic Warfare and Sensors (IEWS), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

The majority of the Army’s EW assets currently come from quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) that have been fielded over the past decade; these capabilities are attack, support and protection. The requirements largely came from theater, and the next systems due for fielding reflect those requests.

U.S. Navy Awards Anti-Submarine Surveillance Contract

March 14, 2013
George I. Seffers

The Applied Physical Sciences Corp., Groton, Conn., is being awarded a potential $21,213,511 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for research and development of configurable technology to provide anti-submarine warfare surveillance over large, operationally relevant, deep ocean areas. This effort will include system architecture and design, sensors and processing, communications mobility, and energy requirements. This contract was competitively procured via a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency broad agency announcement.The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, San Diego, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Air Asset to Send Critical Material to Forces Faster

March 1, 2013
By Rita Boland

The plug-and-play technology will close large capability gaps in the field.

The U.S. Army is developing the first airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platform fully enabled to connect analysts with the Distributed Common Ground System-Army. That system will help remedy problems currently hindering soldiers from having all data feed into a single repository. With the new aircraft, the process will be streamlined from the flying support, so information reaches ground commanders faster to facilitate more timely decision making.

Units will begin enjoying these connected benefits of the Enhanced Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System (EMARSS) aircraft in 2014, with the Army accepting deliveries from Boeing beginning later this year. In the past, all airborne intelligence platforms employed their own unique processing, exploitation and dissemination procedures that transmitted to specific ground stations. Personnel then had to find workarounds to share it with the troops who needed it. Through the Distributed Command Ground System-Army (DCGS-A), analysts can query the single system and retrieve the sensor data remotely.

Soldiers have used the DCGS-A extensively throughout their operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan. However, the Defense Acquisition Executive only approved the system for full deployment across the force in mid-December of last year.

The Army’s Guardrail platform is also DCGS-A capable, but it does not have operators of the system on board nor does it have imagery intelligence (IMINT) capability. Guardrail is designed to support only signals intelligence (SIGINT) to the DCGS-A, while EMARSS will bring in the imagery piece at the secret Internet router protocol network level. In addition, EMARSS will be the first platform that can provide data from secret to top secret immediately into the Army's distributed system.

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