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electronic warfare

Razor Talon Sharpens Services’ Synergy

June 1, 2013
By Rita Boland

Integrating air land, and sea forces on a monthly basis saves money and creates continuity of operations.

Technology experts at the U.S. Air Force’s 4th Fighter Wing based at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, are networking joint units up and down the East Coast to provide unique training opportunities for the modern military. Through their efforts, advancements are being made to further the Air-Sea Battle Concept, simultaneously improving coalition interoperability. The events allow for interservice and international training without strain on organizations’ budgets.

These Razor Talon exercises are monthly large-force exercises that have grown significantly since their first iteration in March 2011. They evolved in part from an inability of units, because of timing or funding, always to send their assets to the major exercise of that type—Red Flag at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. “We needed a large-force exercise to essentially grow mission commanders,” explains Col. Michael Koscheski, USAF, 4th Operations Group commander. Though units from the East Coast can receive world-class training by attending annual, large-scale events, the home station training offered through Razor Talon ensures they can keep up-to-date. Sometimes units miss out for years on attending other exercises because of costs or mission schedules. Razor Talon planners lay out the yearly schedule for their monthly events, and groups see when they are available to participate based on their operations.

L-3 to Support Growler Electronic Warfare Pod

May 13, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
L-3 Communications Corp., San Carlos, Calif., is being awarded an $8,419,810 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to establish a depot for repair of the L8003 output traveling wave tube used in the AN/ALQ-99 (V) Band 4 pod on E/A-6B Prowler and E/A-18 Growler aircraft. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity. 

L-3 to Support Growler Electronic Warfare Pod

May 13, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
L-3 Communications Corp., San Carlos, Calif., is being awarded an $8,419,810 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to establish a depot for repair of the L8003 output traveling wave tube used in the AN/ALQ-99 (V) Band 4 pod on E/A-6B Prowler and E/A-18 Growler aircraft. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity. 

Northrop Grumman to Repair Growler Aircraft Electronic Attack System

May 6, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Northrop Grumman, Bethpage, N.Y. is being awarded $7 million for ceiling-priced delivery order #7168 under a previously awarded basic ordering agreement for the repair of 13 line items on the advanced electronic attack system used on the EA-18G Growler aircraft. The Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity.
 

Iraq to Receive F-16 Electronic Warfare System

May 1, 2013
George I.Seffers

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Corp., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded an $830,000,000 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to contract for additional production of 18 Iraq F-16 aircraft and associated support equipment, technical orders, integrated logistics support, contractor logistics support and an electronic warfare system. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity. 

Harris to Upgrade Counter Communications System

April 29, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Harris Corp., Communication Systems, Palm Bay, Fla., has been awarded a modification to firm-fixed-price contract for two counter communications system (CCS) Block 10 increment 1 system upgrades. The value of this contract modification is $11,323,326 increasing the total contract value from $191,546,750 to $202,870,076. This modification provides for the exercise of an option for the upgrade of the CCS Block 10 system that will increase the overall capability using new, modified, and/or existing equipment. Space and Missile Systems Center, Space Superiority Systems Directorate, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Advanced Capabilities Required for Future Navy Warfighting

April 4, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Future conflicts likely will be fought in degraded information technology environments, which will require the U.S. Navy to develop and exploit new capabilities to continue to operate in contested cyberspace. Technologies such as a flexible information grid, assured timing services and directed energy weapons must be part of the naval information system arsenal if the sea service is to maintain information dominance through the year 2028.

These were just a few of the findings presented in the Navy’s Information Dominance Roadmap 2013-2028, which was released in late March. Presented by Rear Adm. William E. Leigher, USN, the Navy’s director of warfighter integration, the report outlines the growing challenges facing the fleet and how the Navy must meet them.

The report divides information dominance challenges into three areas: assured command and control (C2), battlespace awareness and integrated fires. While the United States will continue to maintain supremacy in those areas, that supremacy is shrinking as more nations are closing the gap between U.S. capabilities and the ability to disrupt them.

Among the advanced capabilities the Navy will require toward the end of the next decade is assured electromagnetic spectrum access. Achieving this will entail fielding greater numbers of advanced line-of-sight communication systems; being able to monitor combat system operational status and adjust it using automated services; having a real-time spectrum operations capability that enables dynamic monitoring and control of spectrum emissions; and generating a common operational picture of the spectrum that is linked to electronic navigation charts and displays operational restrictions.

Consolidation Is 
the Course for Army 
Electronic Warfare

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Melding the disciplines of spectrum combat will enable greater flexibility and more capabilities.

The growth in battlefield electronics has spurred a corresponding growth in electronic warfare. In the same manner that innovative technologies have spawned new capabilities, electronic warfare is becoming more complex as planners look to incorporate new systems into the battlespace.

No longer can electronic warfare (EW) function exclusively in its own domain. The growth of cyber operations has led to an overlap into traditional EW areas. EW activities for countering remote-controlled improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Southwest Asia led to an increased emphasis on EW defense and offense. It also exposed the problem of signal fratricide when those EW operations interfered with allied communication.

The U.S. Army sped many systems into theater, and now it is working to coordinate those technologies into a more organized capability. The effort focuses on an integrated EW approach that will reconcile many of the existing conflicts and clear the way for more widespread use of EW in future conflicts.

“The Army definitely has wrapped its arms around the importance of EW,” declares Col. Joe DuPont, USA, project manager for electronic warfare at the Program Executive Office (PEO) Intelligence Electronic Warfare and Sensors (IEWS), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

The majority of the Army’s EW assets currently come from quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) that have been fielded over the past decade; these capabilities are attack, support and protection. The requirements largely came from theater, and the next systems due for fielding reflect those requests.

One Small Step
 Toward Greater
 Interoperability

April 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

An upcoming demonstration could lead to a giant leap in common electromagnetic components.

U.S. Army researchers intend to demonstrate in the coming weeks that some components, such as antennas and amplifiers, can perform two functions—communications and electronic warfare. The ultimate goal is to use the same components for multiple purposes while dramatically reducing size, weight, power consumption and costs. The effort could lead to a set of common components for electromagnetic systems across the Army, the other military services and even international partners, which would be a boon for battlefield interoperability.

Researchers at the Army’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, are discussing the concept with personnel from a wide range of organizations, including the Army Research Laboratory, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Navy and Air Force research laboratories, universities and other countries. The idea is for common components for command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) to serve multiple functions, such as communications and electronic warfare, possibly switching from one function to the other or even conducting multiple missions simultaneously.

“We work with a number of international partners—NATO of course,” points out Paul Zablocky, senior research scientist for electronic warfare within CERDEC’s Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate. “The other one is The Technical Cooperation Program, which is called TTCP. That particular organization covers the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States.”

Lockheed Martin Receives Electronic Warfare Contract Modification

March 27, 2013
George I. Seffers

Lockheed Martin Corp., Liverpool, N.Y., is being awarded a $30,550,000 modification to previously awarded contract to exercise the firm-fixed-price options for the Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 2 System low-rate initial production units. The SEWIP is an evolutionary acquisition program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) Electronic Warfare System. The SEWIP Block 2 will greatly improve the receiver/antenna group necessary to keep capabilities current with the pace threats and to yield improved system integration. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

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