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electronic warfare

Sotera to Support Electronic Warfare

July 3, 2013
George I. Seffers

Sotera Defense Systems, Herndon, Va., was awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract with a maximum value of $97,850,000 for design, build, integration testing and delivery services in support of the electronic warfare planning and management tool. The Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity. 

A Joint Environment Changes Everything

July 1, 2013
By Max Cacas

Rear Adm. Robert Day Jr., USCG, assistant U.S. Coast Guard commandant for command, control, communications and information technology, sees the Joint Information Environment as an opportunity to resolve some of the most pressing information technology problems in the years to come as he faces a future with more challenges and fewer resources. He says a military-wide common operating environment will establish “enterprisewide mandates that programs cannot ignore.”

The admiral told the recent AFCEA Solutions Series–George Mason University Symposium, “Critical Issues in C4I,” the Joint Information Environment (JIE) will allow for more efficient system configurations and facilitate consolidation of the Coast Guard’s information technology work force. As the director of the U.S. Coast Guard Cyber Command, he also is mindful that the JIE will improve his ability to control what devices are attached to the network, giving him, for example, the opportunity to quickly detect and order the removal of an unauthorized USB thumb drive inserted into a secure network computer.

Hewing to the reality of doing more with less, the admiral also told conference attendees that within the next eight months, the Coast Guard is expected to move to the U.S. Defense Department’s enterprise email system. Adm. Day stated that even though this move initially may cost more in some cases, the long-term benefits to the service will mitigate and justify some of those costs. In addition, acknowledging the futility of reinventing the wheel, he noted that the Coast Guard is adopting the U.S. Air Force’s Virtual Flight Bag, which replaces nearly 300 pounds of printed manuals and charts carried aboard aircraft by crews. Apple iPads will be loaded with digital copies of the same material.

URS to Support Spectrum Electronic Warfare Department in Afghanistan, Iraq and Australia

June 5, 2013
George I. Seffers

URS Federal Technical Services Inc., Germantown, Md., is being awarded a maximum value $18,788,706 fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for engineering, technical and programmatic support for the Spectrum Electronic Warfare Department, which primarily focuses on direct support of airborne electronic defense, airborne electronic attack, maritime, and expeditionary divisions. Tasks include research and development support; system engineering and process engineering; modeling, simulation, and analysis; prototyping, pre-production, model-making and fabrication support; system design documentation and technical data support; software engineering, development, programming and network support; reliability, maintainability and availability; human factors, performance and usability engineering; system safety engineering; configuration management; quality assurance; interoperability, test and evaluation, trials; logistics; supply and provisioning; training; and program support. This contract includes foreign military sales to Afghanistan, Iraq and Australia. The Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity.  

Razor Talon Sharpens Services’ Synergy

June 1, 2013
By Rita Boland

Integrating air land, and sea forces on a monthly basis saves money and creates continuity of operations.

Technology experts at the U.S. Air Force’s 4th Fighter Wing based at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, are networking joint units up and down the East Coast to provide unique training opportunities for the modern military. Through their efforts, advancements are being made to further the Air-Sea Battle Concept, simultaneously improving coalition interoperability. The events allow for interservice and international training without strain on organizations’ budgets.

These Razor Talon exercises are monthly large-force exercises that have grown significantly since their first iteration in March 2011. They evolved in part from an inability of units, because of timing or funding, always to send their assets to the major exercise of that type—Red Flag at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. “We needed a large-force exercise to essentially grow mission commanders,” explains Col. Michael Koscheski, USAF, 4th Operations Group commander. Though units from the East Coast can receive world-class training by attending annual, large-scale events, the home station training offered through Razor Talon ensures they can keep up-to-date. Sometimes units miss out for years on attending other exercises because of costs or mission schedules. Razor Talon planners lay out the yearly schedule for their monthly events, and groups see when they are available to participate based on their operations.

L-3 to Support Growler Electronic Warfare Pod

May 13, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
L-3 Communications Corp., San Carlos, Calif., is being awarded an $8,419,810 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to establish a depot for repair of the L8003 output traveling wave tube used in the AN/ALQ-99 (V) Band 4 pod on E/A-6B Prowler and E/A-18 Growler aircraft. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity. 

L-3 to Support Growler Electronic Warfare Pod

May 13, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
L-3 Communications Corp., San Carlos, Calif., is being awarded an $8,419,810 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to establish a depot for repair of the L8003 output traveling wave tube used in the AN/ALQ-99 (V) Band 4 pod on E/A-6B Prowler and E/A-18 Growler aircraft. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity. 

Northrop Grumman to Repair Growler Aircraft Electronic Attack System

May 6, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Northrop Grumman, Bethpage, N.Y. is being awarded $7 million for ceiling-priced delivery order #7168 under a previously awarded basic ordering agreement for the repair of 13 line items on the advanced electronic attack system used on the EA-18G Growler aircraft. The Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity.
 

Iraq to Receive F-16 Electronic Warfare System

May 1, 2013
George I.Seffers

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Corp., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded an $830,000,000 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to contract for additional production of 18 Iraq F-16 aircraft and associated support equipment, technical orders, integrated logistics support, contractor logistics support and an electronic warfare system. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity. 

Harris to Upgrade Counter Communications System

April 29, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Harris Corp., Communication Systems, Palm Bay, Fla., has been awarded a modification to firm-fixed-price contract for two counter communications system (CCS) Block 10 increment 1 system upgrades. The value of this contract modification is $11,323,326 increasing the total contract value from $191,546,750 to $202,870,076. This modification provides for the exercise of an option for the upgrade of the CCS Block 10 system that will increase the overall capability using new, modified, and/or existing equipment. Space and Missile Systems Center, Space Superiority Systems Directorate, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Advanced Capabilities Required for Future Navy Warfighting

April 4, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Future conflicts likely will be fought in degraded information technology environments, which will require the U.S. Navy to develop and exploit new capabilities to continue to operate in contested cyberspace. Technologies such as a flexible information grid, assured timing services and directed energy weapons must be part of the naval information system arsenal if the sea service is to maintain information dominance through the year 2028.

These were just a few of the findings presented in the Navy’s Information Dominance Roadmap 2013-2028, which was released in late March. Presented by Rear Adm. William E. Leigher, USN, the Navy’s director of warfighter integration, the report outlines the growing challenges facing the fleet and how the Navy must meet them.

The report divides information dominance challenges into three areas: assured command and control (C2), battlespace awareness and integrated fires. While the United States will continue to maintain supremacy in those areas, that supremacy is shrinking as more nations are closing the gap between U.S. capabilities and the ability to disrupt them.

Among the advanced capabilities the Navy will require toward the end of the next decade is assured electromagnetic spectrum access. Achieving this will entail fielding greater numbers of advanced line-of-sight communication systems; being able to monitor combat system operational status and adjust it using automated services; having a real-time spectrum operations capability that enables dynamic monitoring and control of spectrum emissions; and generating a common operational picture of the spectrum that is linked to electronic navigation charts and displays operational restrictions.

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