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electronic warfare

Harris to Upgrade Counter Communications System

April 29, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Harris Corp., Communication Systems, Palm Bay, Fla., has been awarded a modification to firm-fixed-price contract for two counter communications system (CCS) Block 10 increment 1 system upgrades. The value of this contract modification is $11,323,326 increasing the total contract value from $191,546,750 to $202,870,076. This modification provides for the exercise of an option for the upgrade of the CCS Block 10 system that will increase the overall capability using new, modified, and/or existing equipment. Space and Missile Systems Center, Space Superiority Systems Directorate, El Segundo, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Advanced Capabilities Required for Future Navy Warfighting

April 4, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Future conflicts likely will be fought in degraded information technology environments, which will require the U.S. Navy to develop and exploit new capabilities to continue to operate in contested cyberspace. Technologies such as a flexible information grid, assured timing services and directed energy weapons must be part of the naval information system arsenal if the sea service is to maintain information dominance through the year 2028.

These were just a few of the findings presented in the Navy’s Information Dominance Roadmap 2013-2028, which was released in late March. Presented by Rear Adm. William E. Leigher, USN, the Navy’s director of warfighter integration, the report outlines the growing challenges facing the fleet and how the Navy must meet them.

The report divides information dominance challenges into three areas: assured command and control (C2), battlespace awareness and integrated fires. While the United States will continue to maintain supremacy in those areas, that supremacy is shrinking as more nations are closing the gap between U.S. capabilities and the ability to disrupt them.

Among the advanced capabilities the Navy will require toward the end of the next decade is assured electromagnetic spectrum access. Achieving this will entail fielding greater numbers of advanced line-of-sight communication systems; being able to monitor combat system operational status and adjust it using automated services; having a real-time spectrum operations capability that enables dynamic monitoring and control of spectrum emissions; and generating a common operational picture of the spectrum that is linked to electronic navigation charts and displays operational restrictions.

Consolidation Is 
the Course for Army 
Electronic Warfare

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Melding the disciplines of spectrum combat will enable greater flexibility and more capabilities.

The growth in battlefield electronics has spurred a corresponding growth in electronic warfare. In the same manner that innovative technologies have spawned new capabilities, electronic warfare is becoming more complex as planners look to incorporate new systems into the battlespace.

No longer can electronic warfare (EW) function exclusively in its own domain. The growth of cyber operations has led to an overlap into traditional EW areas. EW activities for countering remote-controlled improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Southwest Asia led to an increased emphasis on EW defense and offense. It also exposed the problem of signal fratricide when those EW operations interfered with allied communication.

The U.S. Army sped many systems into theater, and now it is working to coordinate those technologies into a more organized capability. The effort focuses on an integrated EW approach that will reconcile many of the existing conflicts and clear the way for more widespread use of EW in future conflicts.

“The Army definitely has wrapped its arms around the importance of EW,” declares Col. Joe DuPont, USA, project manager for electronic warfare at the Program Executive Office (PEO) Intelligence Electronic Warfare and Sensors (IEWS), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

The majority of the Army’s EW assets currently come from quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) that have been fielded over the past decade; these capabilities are attack, support and protection. The requirements largely came from theater, and the next systems due for fielding reflect those requests.

One Small Step
 Toward Greater
 Interoperability

April 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

An upcoming demonstration could lead to a giant leap in common electromagnetic components.

U.S. Army researchers intend to demonstrate in the coming weeks that some components, such as antennas and amplifiers, can perform two functions—communications and electronic warfare. The ultimate goal is to use the same components for multiple purposes while dramatically reducing size, weight, power consumption and costs. The effort could lead to a set of common components for electromagnetic systems across the Army, the other military services and even international partners, which would be a boon for battlefield interoperability.

Researchers at the Army’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, are discussing the concept with personnel from a wide range of organizations, including the Army Research Laboratory, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Navy and Air Force research laboratories, universities and other countries. The idea is for common components for command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) to serve multiple functions, such as communications and electronic warfare, possibly switching from one function to the other or even conducting multiple missions simultaneously.

“We work with a number of international partners—NATO of course,” points out Paul Zablocky, senior research scientist for electronic warfare within CERDEC’s Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate. “The other one is The Technical Cooperation Program, which is called TTCP. That particular organization covers the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States.”

Lockheed Martin Receives Electronic Warfare Contract Modification

March 27, 2013
George I. Seffers

Lockheed Martin Corp., Liverpool, N.Y., is being awarded a $30,550,000 modification to previously awarded contract to exercise the firm-fixed-price options for the Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 2 System low-rate initial production units. The SEWIP is an evolutionary acquisition program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) Electronic Warfare System. The SEWIP Block 2 will greatly improve the receiver/antenna group necessary to keep capabilities current with the pace threats and to yield improved system integration. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Evidence of Possible Spring Cyber Attack on Banking Industry

January 3, 2013
By Max Cacas

The purpose of the attack is purely robbery, says a cyber expert, who has shared his McAfee report with government officials.

A cyber attack that could result in the theft of millions of dollars from American banks could take place this spring, according to a report from a noted cybersecurity expert. 
“What we’re dealing with here is a digital bank robber,” according to Ryan Sherstobitoff, a threats researcher with McAfee Labs and the principal author of the report entitled, “Analyzing Project Blitzkrieg, a Credible Threat.” And the attack mastermind could take additional steps to deter attacked banks from defending themselves and hinder their ability to recover stolen funds following such an attack.

The group behind the potential attack “is a collaboration or an alliance of ‘botmasters’ run by an individual named vorVzakone with the clear intention of robbing financial institutions,” Sherstobitoff explains in a report that was issued in mid-December. The white paper is based on months of in-depth analysis of Project Blitzkrieg, as it has been dubbed by vorVzakone’s website, and tracking the online activities of vorVzakone dating back to late summer 2012. “We know from forum posts he had published on an underground Russian cyberforum that was really meant for cybercriminals,” explains Sherstobitoff.  Those posts detailed how the attack was to be coordinated around the release of a variant of the trojan malware popularly known in the hacker community as Gozi Prinimalka.

Boeing to Provide Airborne Electronic Attack Kits to Australia

December 21, 2012
George I. Seffers

 
The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Mo., is being awarded a $164 million contract modification for the procurement of 12 Airborne Electronic Attack Group B Kits and four Equivalent Ship-sets of spares for the Royal Australian Air Force. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. 

URS to Support Electronic Warfare

November 16, 2012
George I. Seffers

URS Federal Technical Services Inc., Germantown Md., is being awarded a maximum value $7,893,315 fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for engineering, technical, and programmatic support for the Spectrum Electronic Warfare Department of Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind. Spectrum Electronic Warfare Department’s primary focus areas are in direct support of airborne electronic defense, airborne electronic attack, maritime, and expeditionary divisions. This contract is a continuation of current services, pending the competitive award of follow-on support. Contract support tasks include: research and development support; system engineering and process engineering; modeling, simulation, and analysis; prototyping, pre-production, model-making and fabrication support; system design documentation and technical data support; software engineering, development, programming and network support; reliability, maintainability and availability; human factors, performance and usability engineering; system safety engineering; configuration management; quality assurance; interoperability, test & evaluation, trials; logistics; supply and provisioning; training; and program support. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity.

BAH to Support C4ISR Training for Saudi Arabia

August 1, 2012
By George Seffers

Booz Allen Hamilton Incorporated, McLean, Virginia, is being awarded a $23,181,469 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to provide support services in the areas of training and education; engineering; program and financial management; plans and programs; communications, command, control, computers and intelligence and electronic warfare; naval operations; manpower and personnel management; technical support; logistic and supply; English-language training; special studies and management support services for the Royal Saudi Naval Forces associated with Saudi Naval Support Program requirements in the United States and Saudi Arabia. Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

Systems Engineering to Support Submarine Imaging and Electronic Warfare

July 25, 2012
By George Seffers

Systems Engineering Associates Corporation, Middletown, Rhode Island, is being awarded a $29,402,044 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to provide lab support services, fabrication, repair, installation and maintenance services in support of submarine imaging, electronic warfare, communication, antenna, and special project programs. Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport, Rhode Island, is the contracting activity.

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