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LandWarNet08

Land Power Requires System Integration and Development of Architecture

August 21, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

System integration is the name of the game if the U.S. Army is to be able to succeed in this new age of persistent conflict, said Lt. Gen. Michael A. Vane, USA, director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center. Saying that the Army is challenged to fight this new war, the general called for network access for the leader and the soldier.

Land power, more than any other domain, requires integration of processes and capabilities, he told a luncheon audience. And, this state of persistent conflict has increased the importance of the individual soldier. That translates to a broad-based integration of systems to extend beneficial capabilities down to the warfighter.

A key element is the development of architectures, Gen. Vane pointed out. He said the operational architecture must drive the system architecture, which must be supported by a technology architecture. Right now, teams are working toward vital integration goals.

Parks: No Distinct Cyberspace Command

August 21, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

The dream of a separate and distinct cyberspace command is not going to happen, because cyberspace is an arena in which everyone operates. This was the declaration of the director, U.S. Army Information Operations (USAIOP) and U.S. Army Computer Network Operation-Electronic Warfare Proponents (USAEWP), Combined Arms Command, Fort Leavenworth. Col. Wayne A. Parks, USA, told a track presentation audience yesterday that all aspects of the force use cyberspace, so it is not so much a specific discipline as a theater of operations.

"We have operations in cyberspace, not cyberspace operations," he stated.

Col. Parks added that cyberspace cannot be separated from electronic warfare, as adversaries are using all of the electromagnetic spectrum to access networks. The wired and wireless worlds now are similar.

Chilton: Cyberspace is a Domain

August 21, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

Gen. Kevin P. Chilton, USAF, commander, U.S. Strategic Command had a message for attendees here, emphasizing that cyberspace is a domain that the military must operate in and defend. "I consider the surface of the ocean a domain...I consider land a domain," he said during the morning plenary address. "I consider air a domain. I consider space a domain and I consider cyberspace a domain."

Problems in cyberspace can extend to other domains, reducing the ability to command and control troops and conduct missions effectively. In addition, vulnerabilites in one part of the network can affect locations worldwide. Intelligence support is critical for network operations just as it is for operations in other areas. Gen. Chilton called recent attacks on U.S. networks espionage, similar to the practices used by spies. "This can all be done from the comfort of your home in your parent country," he stated

To protect the network, personnel must be prepared and policies must be enforced. The U.S. military needs to improve the security of the Nonsecure Internet protocol routing network by training all warfighters on rules and regulations regarding its use and ensuring such procedures are followed. Gen. Chilton recommends that commanders make it their business to pay attention to the health of the networks every day, and concern themselves with problems and violations. To help alleviate these problems, he advocates cyberspace training in the military academies and service schools, as well as military cyberspace exercises and training events to prepare for attacks.

Army Stands Up 7th Signal Command

August 20, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

The U.S Army is establishing the 7th Signal Command (Theater), a signal command for the continental United States (CONUS). Based at Fort Gordon, Georgia, the command reached cadre status in July and will reach initial and full operational capabilities in phased stages. The commander, Brig. Gen. Jennifer L. Napper, USA, is dual-hatted, leading the command and serving as the G-6 for Army Forces Command concurrently.

Col. Michael Kell, USA, G-3 for 7th Signal Command, explained to a track session audience here that his organization will help create centralized control in the United States for commanders looking for signal support during operations. He pointed out that the majority of troops are located within the United States, not overseas. "We are a CONUS-based Army, there's no doubt about that," he said. Part of the command's mission includes extending LandWarNet capabilites to operating and generating forces. It also will establish information managment capabilities and enable the Global Collaboration Environment.

The command will result in a restructuring of forces, with the 21st Signal Brigade scheduled to fall under its authority and the activation of the 93rd and 106th Signal Brigades at Fort Eustis, Virginia, and Fort Sam Houston, Texas. At full staffing, the 7thSignal Command Theater should employ 606 military and civilian personnel. Also unique to the command is an intelligence analysis cell within the G-2. The command will work to develop a relationship with the National Security Agency facility at Fort Gordon so the analysts can counter cyberthreats to CONUS networks.

Communication panel emphasizes security concerns

August 20, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

The U.S. Army's major communications elements are facing different issues as they try to achieve ever-changing goals amid budgetary, cultural and technological challenges.

Brig. Gen. Susan Lawrence, USA, commanding general, NETCOM/9th Signal Command, emphasized the importance of information security-and how that is not given enough attention. "We are not doing well securing our NIPRNET-it's a sieve," she told attendees at a special panel discussion today. The Army is doing well securing its SIPRNET, but it is not robust enough. The warfighter must understand the security threat, she declared.

And, this problem is going to get worse as data proliferates. Gen. Lawrence warned that, with data expected to double in the next few years, the Army must learn to manage that data smartly and efficiently. The problem is not in the pipes, but in the data flowing through them.

Training signal professionals is becoming more complex each year, and Brig. Gen. Jeffrey W. Foley, USA, commanding general of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, said that his command's campaign plan is "intricately tied" to other Army information campaign plans. He said that Fort Gordon "is in relentless pursuit of world-class training."

The Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM) Life Cycle Management Command is trying to prepare to move its entire operation concurrent with combat operations overseas. Its commanding general, Maj. Gen. Dennis L, Via, USA, said that the closing of Fort Monmouth provides the command with the ability to rebuild the organization. He predicted process improvements, enhanced integration and more co-located organizations at the new facility being built at Aberdeen Proving Ground.

Hight: Think bigger

August 20, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

Where most leaders would endeavor to view the big picture, Rear Adm. Elizabeth Hight, USN, vice director, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), sees the biggest picture of all. The issue for communicators is not about serving an activity, or a service, or even a military. Nor is it about winning a war in the kinetic sense. It is about all of the services coming together to attain a national goal. But, the rub is how an organization can pursue that goal without losing track of its own specific needs.

Casey: Army needs reset and transformation

August 19, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

The U.S. Army is so consumed by the demands of the current fight that it cannot do the things that it is supposed to do, according to its highest-ranking officer. Gen. George W. Casey, USA, the U.S. Army chief of staff, charged that the service is badly out of whack because it has been caught between two worlds.

The United States "didn't have the Army we needed" after 9/11, Gen. Casey told a large crowd at today's plenary session. It has been transforming into the force it needs to be concurrent with combat operations around the globe, and that has not been a smooth process. Currently, the Army is about "70 percent there" in its drive to transform, the chief of staff claimed.

One thing the Army needs immediately is a systematic reset process, he emphasized. Troops that return from Iraq or Afghanistan incur substantial personnel and material costs. In terms of materiel, each rotation from those two countries costs about $70 billion to reset. Having a systematic reset process will help compel the force transformation into a true expeditionary army, he declared.

Sorenson: LandWarNet Program Fragmented, Needs Coordinated Plan

August 19, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

The U.S. Army's LandWarNet program, the focus of Army IT modernization-and the focus of this conference-is fragmented, unsecure, expensive and not standardized. This came from Lt. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sorenson, USA, the U.S. Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6. He told today's luncheon audience that the Army will fix these problems, but it will take a coordinated plan to do so. This Army enterprise network campaign plan will be developed by October, he offered.

Budgetary pressures could impose severe limitations on the Army's ability to modernize its IT infrastructure. Gen. Sorenson told an attentive audience how the Army is entering a period of tremendous uncertainty in terms of its budget, with only half of the IT programs currently funded.

Many existing Army battle command systems in the field are stovepiped, the general noted. The FCS BC is a system of systems, but not every Army system will be FCS-enabled, so interoperability remains a goal.

Donahue: Enabling Expeditionary Capabilities in a CONUS Based Army

August 19, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

Despite its ongoing operations around the world, the U.S. Army is a CONUS-based force that must be able to deploy its capabilities seamlessly. Unfortunately, that is not yet the case. Brig. Gen. Brian Donahue, USA, director of the LandWarNet office, Army G-3/5/7, described that challenge to an overflow crowd in a combined track this morning exploring expeditionary capabilities and horizontal network centricity.

And, the Army must be able to maintain its full capabilities throughout the entire spectrum of a deployed operation. Gen. Donahue declared that the Army no longer can afford to separate operational aspects. It must engage in decisive combat-phase three-concurrent with phase four stabilization operations. This was not done in the Iraq War, and now U.S. forces are paying the price.
So it must smooth out capability changes throughout deployment and operation. When the Army was forward deployed, this was not as much of an issue. But now, it cannot afford problems on the CONUS end.

Plans are underway. Over the next 60 days, the Army will sort out a construct at the DOIM level, he stated.

Sorenson: Talk to the Soldiers in the Field

August 19, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

LandWarNet 2008 began with an introduction by Lt. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sorenson, USA, the U.S. Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6. While Gen. Sorenson's remarks largely focused on what would take place during the three-day conference and exposition, some of his anecdotal comments illuminated the key issues that he hopes will be addressed by the many Army and industry attendees.

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