Search:  

 Blog     e-Newsletter       Resource Library      Directories      Webinars  Apps     EBooks
   AFCEA logo
 

Event Coverage

Offensive Sea Power Sacrificed for Defenses

January 25, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Navy may have gone too far in emphasizing defensive measures over offensive capabilities, which it may need to rectify quickly. Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt, USN, commander, U.S. Third Fleet, told the Kickoff Address audience at West 2011 that the recent emphasis on missile defense and cyberspace security may have overlooked the need to maintain leading-edge offensive capabilities in related areas. "We've stepped away and become too defensive," the admiral declared. The Navy needs to develop offensive capabilities to take the fight to the adversary instead of merely being reactive, he continued. Protecting the fleet is necessary, but the sea service must not neglect its strike mission. In particular, while citing the importance of cybersecurity, the admiral called for an offensive cyberspace capability-"look at it from a warfighter perspective," he said.

Nontraditional Missions Vital to U.S. Navy Success

January 25, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Maintaining maritime security will require humanitarian activities as well as traditional gunboat diplomacy, according to a U.S. Navy fleet commander. Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt, USN, commander, U.S. Third Fleet, told the Kickoff Address audience at West 2011 that being able to provide disaster response and humanitarian assistance will be vital for ensuring maritime security. Many nations "could go either way" in either supporting or opposing U.S. national interests, the admiral explained. If the United States can respond rapidly and effectively when one of those nations suffers a natural disaster, that action could be the tipping agent that swings the nation into the U.S. column, he said. "It's not just kinetic power ... we must be a global force for good," Adm. Hunt declared.

Cyber Measures Could Ensure Security but Compromise Freedom

November 3, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

The key to providing greatly enhanced cyber security may be at hand, but it may also eliminate one of the Internet's greatest characteristics, and a middle ground may be hard to achieve. Carter Bullard, president and chief executive officer, QoSient, told the audience at a MILCOM 2010 Wednesday afternoon panel on cyber security that technologies are needed for three elements-attribution, mitigation and deterrence. Attaining attribution and mitigation will lead to deterrence, he maintained. A key means of attribution is non-repudiation, which he described as having the potential to go after the entire threat matrix. This discipline would provide comprehensive accountability that prevents any interloper from concealing that they attacked, thus creating the concept that a hacker can get caught. Bullard bemoaned the fact that no one is building technology for non-repudiation, calling it "the most misunderstood countermeasure." However, one of his fellow panelists raised an alarm about its incorporation. Elliot Proebstel, on the technical staff of Sandia National Laboratories, warned that building in non-repudiation might threaten valued Internet freedoms. The existing anonymity that every Internet user takes for granted might disappear as every user could be identified. This would be a boon to dictatorships that seek to identify and stifle Internet users opposed to their regimes, he offered.

Cyber Is too Complex: Simplify

October 29, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

Thoreau's words increasingly apply to securing cyberspace.

Cyberspace Dominance not a Distant Goal

October 27, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

The United States has air supremacy; why not cyberspace supremacy?

Once Again, a Catastrophic Homeland Attack May Loom

October 27, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

The United States may need a "dot-secure" cyber realm to protect vital infrastructure elements such as banking.

Warfighting Capabilities Hinge on Cyber Security

October 26, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

"The focus now is on computers over comms, and that's a problem."

Network Visibility May Be the Miltary's Achilles' Heel

October 26, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

The medium literally is the message in Pacific Command operations, as network situational awareness may be the determining factor in the success of future operations. Adm. Robert F. Willard, USN, commander of the U.S. Pacific Command, warned that U.S. military capabilities in this area are strongly lacking. "In command and control, you can't control what you can't see, and you must be able to control everything in these domains," Adm. Willard said. Speaking at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2010, Adm. Willard related that recent Pacific rim exercises illustrated the problem. The cyber element was set up weeks in advance, and it was supported to an unprecedented level by personnel from the newly established U.S. Cyber Command and from other organizations and industry. Yet, at best, experts had visibility into only 50 percent of cyberspace. Worse, leadership had the ability to sense and command in only 10 percent. "You can't command and control that domain unless you can see into it, sense inside it and control it," the admiral reiterated. Often the challenges of network situational awareness overwhelm those tasked with managing it, he continued. "Many people have such a profound sense of complexity about it that they almost give up. But we can't give up," he emphasized.

Together the Military Really Can Do More

August 5, 2010
By Rita Boland

Joint is the name of the game on the battlefield and at LandWarNet as Lt. Gen. William T. Lord, USAF, chief of warfighting integration and chief information officer for the U.S Air Force gave the final address of the conference this afternoon. The general said that he believes all future operations will be joint because the services are too small now to operate on their own. Everyone needs the synergy of the combined force to carry out their operations.

Policy Remains Major Barrier to Interoperability

August 5, 2010
By Rita Boland

Policy and governance remain the biggest hurdles to interoperability among military services and their various allies and partners according to the joint/coalition panel held this morning at LandWarNet. Representatives from the British Armed Forces, U.S. Marine Corps, the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and the Office of the Secretary of Defense sat on a panel moderated by a U.S. Navy admiral from the joint staff to discuss the issues inherent in information sharing in coalition and disaster response missions. Throughout the discussion, panelists made jokes to amuse and engage the audience, but their message was deadly serious-information must be delivered to warfighters at the tactical edge so they can successfully, safely carry out their missions.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Event Coverage