Europe

September 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Armor defense systems, hypervelocity missiles, new sighting and seeker technologies, large-scale simulations redefine endgame.

Building on a broad research base at the forefront of military technologies, German industry is developing a vast array of components and systems for the Bundeswehr and other allied military forces. New concepts tumble forth almost daily from German industry and government laboratories to improve tactical programs, especially in the areas of sensor, fire control, combat management, communication and simulation systems.

September 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Division-level tactical network integrates communications, command, control system platforms, combat vehicles.

Spain’s army is benefiting from information technology development by the nation’s domestic industry. A mesh system of nodal centers is being developed and deployed for mobile command, control and communications. Independent of terrain considerations, the multimedia voice and data system covers the operational area of an army division.

September 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Multinational strength buttresses efforts to meet evolving world challenges.

As the U.S. armed forces continue to transform their own inner workings and construct the means for cooperating in a joint environment, a similar—though much larger—phenomenon is well underway as countries throughout the world explore their role in international operations. At the heart of the matter are questions about political objectives, legal constraints and the status of technology development—tough issues that require the framers of this new global community to be part architect, part foreman and part bricklayer.

September 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Continental industry mobilizes, partners, collaborates, serves notice as growing force with which to reckon.

Buttressed by a wave of mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures, France’s defense and aerospace industries are becoming increasingly competitive in cutting-edge technologies. This especially is the case in the development of electronics, command, control, communications and sensor systems.

September 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Industry contraction spotlights business adjustments.

Twin pressures of extremely complex advanced technologies and far fewer major defense and aerospace programs are propelling the worldwide consolidation of industry. This evolution is characterized by moves away from nationally based, fragmented approaches and toward mergers, consortiums and joint ventures in an era of fewer major global prime contractors.

September 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

Interoperability for 19 nations takes more than just system commonality.

The march of technology is improving interoperability and increasing capabilities among NATO and Partnership for Peace nations. New systems and bridging components are allowing forces to share information to a greater degree and under more circumstances than ever. However, the same new technologies are spawning a new generation of capabilities that are complicating efforts for true alliance interoperability.

September 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Common products, practices and standards create enhanced environment for coalition operations.

The adoption of network-based operations combined with commercial information technology and telecommunications products is enhancing the interoperability of North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Partnership for Peace nations’ military forces. These developments also are allowing many smaller and former Eastern Bloc countries to rapidly evolve their militaries into modern information-based organizations.

September 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

All-or-nothing information sharing technologies fail multinational reality test.

The U.S. Defense Department is coordinating a multidimensional effort to seek out technologies that would bring order to the oftentimes chaotic environment of a coalition operation. Among the top priorities is identifying information security approaches that ensure continued communications when the composition of the coalition changes or the ad hoc area network is attacked.

September 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

A network—if built—would be able to carry all types of services and protocols.

A group of Russian telecommunications scientists has developed a new technology that can serve as a backbone for today’s multiple communications protocols or as a stand-alone network. It can be scaled from a local area network up to a global telecommunications system capable of carrying voice, data and video simultaneously.

September 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Different waveforms pose no compatibility problem.

The software programmable radio era has spawned a new generation of units designed to interoperate while simultaneously serving specific service and platform needs. The result of these digital genetics is instant interoperability among land, sea and air forces as well as software-driven upgrades and compatibility with other systems.

September 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Command and control group strives for fast changes after September 11.

The increasing importance of network-centric warfare and the new war on terrorism have accelerated the urgency for NATO to implement new information technologies across the spectrum of its political and military operations. However, obsolete procurement architectures, differing political cultures and outright national chauvinism have been the major obstacles to rapid integration of new command, control and communications systems for NATO, according to a leading alliance official.

September 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Joining the Atlantic alliance was just the beginning for the former Warsaw Pact nation.

The post-Cold-War world holds both common and unique challenges for one of NATO’s newest members. As one of three nations admitted to NATO in 1999, Hungary is wrestling with national and military goals that must constantly adjust to changing requirements both internally and internationally.

September 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

A multinational team gathers other allied firms to build an airborne radar.

The future may be at hand in the form of a multicontinental contractor team that combines existing technology to develop an advanced radar system. This industry group draws on expertise from companies located in all 19 NATO nations to produce a system that could finally realize a long-sought NATO airborne ground surveillance capability.

September 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

September 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

September 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

September 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

September 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Polish armed forces engage in military exercises in Poland. The NATO nation is grappling with the challenge of upgrading its military while fulfilling international commitments overseas. 
The new NATO stalwart transforms on the run.

September 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Application permits users to remotely access technical data, eliminates need to transport documents.

Front line British troops soon will be able to access maintenance documentation electronically through a portal-based software system. By clicking on an icon, personnel will download data onto their laptops or handheld computers for immediate reference at flight lines or repair operations. The technology saves space in logistics chains once required for transporting paper documents and allows process or equipment changes to be noted immediately and made available across all military services.

September 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Networked sensor offers enhanced command, control and communications.

An advanced Swedish radar system capable of rapidly detecting and tracking multiple targets provides commanders with precious additional seconds in medium- and short-range air defense engagements. The radar can quickly sweep a section of sky in three dimensions and relay data to weapons platforms or to other sensors on a network.

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