Schedule

SEPTEMBER 18, 2014

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.
SUMMIT WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION

The Honorable John Negroponte

Former Director of National Intelligence

INSA Chairman of the Board


The Honorable John Negroponte
Former Director of National Intelligence

Ambassador John D. Negroponte became the Chairman of the Intelligence and National Security Alliance on January 1, 2013. As Chairman, he works with the INSA Board and staff to further develop and implement INSA’s strategic vision and programs. Before coming to INSA he became Vice Chairman of McLarty Associates and began a position at Yale University as a distinguished senior research fellow in 2009. Prior to this, his recent positions in government have been Director of National Intelligence under President Bush and Deputy Secretary of State. While in industry from 1997 to 2001, he was executive vice president of the McGraw-Hill Companies. He has held many government positions over the past 50 years; serving as Ambassador to Honduras, Mexico, the Philippines, the United Nations, and Iraq; also serving on the National Security Council staff as Director for Vietnam under President Nixon and Deputy National Security Advisor under President Reagan. He has received numerous awards: twice receiving the State Department’s Distinguished Service Medal, the highest award conferred by the Secretary; and the National Security Medal for his contributions to national security by President Bush.

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Lt. Gen. Robert Shea, USMC (Ret.)

President and CEO
AFCEA International

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
SUMMIT OVERVIEW

Ms. Maureen Baginski

Chair

AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Intelligence and National Security Summit Co-Chair

Ambassador Joe DeTrani

President

Intelligence and National Security Alliance

Intelligence and National Security Summit Co-Chair

8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
PLENARY SESSION ONE: INTELLIGENCE EFFECTIVENESS, TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY: A DISCUSSION WITH THE DNI

 

Overview

Conducting intelligence activities in a democracy requires constant recalibration and fine-tuning to balance the requirements for liberty and security. The last 12 years have been an especially difficult period for the leaders of the Executive, Judiciary and Legislative branches of government. Opinion leaders in the press publicly debate the issues surrounding an effective intelligence capability that is both accountable for its performance and perhaps offers some degree of transparency. This session will explore these issues and the progress being made toward achieving a national consensus about rules governing U.S. intelligence operations.

 

Speaker

The Honorable James Clapper

Director of National Intelligence


The Honorable James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence

The Honorable James R. Clapper was sworn in as the fourth Director of National Intelligence (DNI) on August 9, 2010. As DNI, he leads the United States Intelligence Community and serves as the principal intelligence advisor to the President. His career began as a rifleman in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve and culminated as a lieutenant general in the U.S. Air Force and Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. Directly following his retirement in 1995, he worked in industry for six years as an executive in three successive companies, specializing in the Intelligence Community. He returned to the government in 2001 as the first civilian director of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). He served as Director for five years, transforming it into the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), as it is today. Prior to becoming the DNI, he served as the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence.

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Focus Questions

  • What would a national consensus for intelligence operations look like?
  • How can the Intelligence Community better anticipate the potential consequences of its actions?
  • How can greater transparency and accountability make the Intelligence Community more effective?
  • What can we do to improve the Intelligence Community’s real-time understanding of its own performance?
9:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
TRACK BREAKOUT SESSIONS

THE CYBER THREAT AND THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE

1 GIAC CPE, 1 CompTIA CEU for Security+ and CompTIA Advanced Security Professional (CASP)**

Overview

The ability to operate freely and securely in cyberspace is essential to national prosperity and security. Doing so requires that cyber security evolve from traditional approaches that sound alarms and lock doors once the thief is already in the house to one that can prevent potential intrusions by providing timely and actionable warning. This session will examine the emergence of cyber threat intelligence as an approach to strengthening secure cyber operations. Its particular focus will be on the appropriate balance between traditional cyber security practices and tailored cyber threat intelligence services.

 

Moderator

Mr. Richard Ledgett, Jr.

Deputy Director

National Security Agency


Mr. Richard Ledgett, Jr.
Deputy Director
National Security Agency

Mr. Ledgett serves as the Deputy Director and senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency. In this capacity he acts as the Agency’s chief operating officer, responsible for guiding and directing studies, operations, and policy. Mr. Ledgett began his NSA career in 1988 and has served in operational, management, and technical leadership positions at the branch, division, office, and group levels. He has served as the Director of the NSA/CSS Threat Operations Center, in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence in both the collection and cyber mission areas, and he was the first National Intelligence Manager for Cyber. Previous positions at NSA include Deputy Director for Analysis and Production (2009 – 2010), Deputy Director for Data Acquisition (2006 – 2009), Assistant Deputy Director for Data Acquisition (2005 – 2006), and Chief, NSA/CSS Pacific (2002 – 2005). Mr. Ledgett spent nearly 11 years in the U.S. Army as a SIGINTer and, between the Army and NSA, has completed six field tours.

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Panelists

Mr. Ron Carback

Defense Intelligence Officer for Cyber

Defense Intelligence Agency


Mr. Ron Carback
Defense Intelligence Officer for Cyber
Defense Intelligence Agency

Mr. Carback is on joint duty assignment as the Defense Intelligence Officer for Cyber at the Defense Intelligence Agency. Mr. Carback has served at NSA in a variety of leadership positions across operational and technical areas and has been engaged in significant collaboration across the Intelligence Community and with foreign partners. He has served overseas in the United Kingdom as well as in Baghdad, Iraq, where he supported both warfighters and policymakers. He chaired the National SIGINT Committee in Washington, D.C. where he supported both the Director of National Intelligence and the Director of the NSA. Prior to his current assignment, he served as Deputy Director of Intelligence (J2) at United States Cyber Command. A native of Maryland, Mr. Carback enjoys golfing and snow skiing. He also serves as Committee Chair for Young Life Carroll County.

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Mr. Tom Conway

Director, Federal Business Development

FireEye, Inc.


Mr. Tom Conway
Director, Federal Business Development
FireEye, Inc.

Tom Conway is the Director of Federal Business Development at FireEye. In his role, he shapes and executes the company's going forward strategy in serving US Department of Defense, Civilian, and Intelligence community client requirements as well as the cybersecurity needs of Defense Industrial Base prime contractors.

A 28 year veteran of the Federal information technology industry, Tom has worked in progressively more responsible positions at market leaders including Intel, McAfee, Northrop Grumman, Falcon Systems, and Zenith Data Systems. He is a charter member of the AFCEA Cyber Committee and also an active member of the Intelligence & National Security Alliance (INSA). Mr. Conway has been a frequently quoted spokesperson in a wide variety of print and broadcast media outlets covering Federal and general cybersecurity topics.

A native of Northern Virginia, Tom holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from James Madison University and a Master of Business Adminitration from George Mason University, both in Virginia.

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Mr. Lance Dubsky

Chief Information Security Officer

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency


Mr. Lance Dubsky
Chief Information Security Officer
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Mr. Dubsky serves as the NGA Chief Information Security Officer and Director, Information Security Management Office. Prior to his current assignment, Mr. Dubsky was the Deputy Director, Composite Information Assurance Office, National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), providing executive leadership in the area of information assurance policy and planning, systems security engineering, vulnerability assessments, cyber defense, and risk management. Mr. Dubsky was selected by the Department of Defense Chief Information Officer to serve as Co-Chair for the Committee for National Security Systems Subcommittee (CNSS) from 2010 to 2011 where he assisted the Department of Defense CIO in managing, directing, executing, overseeing and implementing CNSS policies and strategies across the Federal government. A veteran of the United States Air Force, Mr. Dubsky served 20 years in the field of Communications-Computer Operations, retiring in 2001.

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Dr. Matt Gaston

Director, Emerging Technology Center

Software Engineering Institute
Carnegie Mellon University


Dr. Matt Gaston
Director of Emerging Technologies
Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute

Dr. Gaston is Director of the SEI Emerging Technology Center (ETC) at Carnegie Mellon University. He assists the Department of Defense and the intelligence community in identifying, evaluating, developing, and transitioning leading-edge data-intensive scalable computing technologies. Dr. Gaston also holds an appointment as an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Carnegie Mellon University Institute for Software Research. Before joining the SEI, Gaston was the Director of Research at Viz, a business area of General Dynamics C4 Systems (GDC4S), where he led research activities for the Battle Management System Division. Prior to his work with GDC4S, Gaston served as the Technical Director of the Advanced Analysis Laboratory (AAL) at the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) where he led numerous activities to bring new technology and innovation to intelligence analysis. He has published in the fields of complex networks, machine learning, multi-agent systems, and operations research.

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BG Paul Nakasone, USA

Commander

Cyber National Mission Force

US Cyber Command

Focus Questions

  • Are public and private sector cyber security programs that lack an intelligence component still relevant? How mature must a government or industry security program be to benefit from intelligence?
  • What is the best way to communicate cyber threat intelligence effectively to senior leaders?
  • When building threat intelligence sharing and analytics communities, is there a tipping point at how big the community can grow? If so, how is that limit determined?

THE HOMELAND SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE AND STRATEGIC AND TACTICAL WARNING

1 GIAC CPE**

Overview

Since the passage of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act (IRTPA) in 2004, the United States Intelligence Community has struggled to meld national intelligence indications and warning with domestic law enforcement preparation, prevention and disruption. This session will explore the nexus of the national intelligence enterprise with the broad and diverse homeland security enterprise. It will look for examples of effective cross-domain collaboration and identify those areas where improved information sharing and collaboration are not only necessary but also an imperative to defend the homeland from the ever-changing threat. At its conclusion, attendees can expect to better understand the sometimes countervailing forces at work in providing effective threat assessments and warning while protecting sources and methods, sensitive investigative information, and privacy, civil rights and civil liberties.

 

Moderator

The Honorable Caryn Wagner

Former Under Secretary for Intelligence & Analysis

Department of Homeland Security


The Honorable Caryn Wagner
Former Under Secretary for Intelligence & Analysis
Department of Homeland Security

Ms. Wagner has over 33 years of experience in the intelligence, national and homeland security fields. She is one of very few intelligence professionals who have worked at the intersection of national and homeland security as the Undersecretary for Intelligence and Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security. In that position, she was responsible for intelligence support to the Department and information sharing with State, local, tribal and territorial law enforcement officials and first responders. Earlier in her career, she was also responsible for intelligence analysis for the Department of Defense, as the Deputy Director for Analysis and Production at the Defense Intelligence Agency. She served as the first Chief Financial Officer for the National Intelligence Program when the Office of the Director of National Intelligence was created, after heading the its smaller predecessor organization, the Intelligence Community Management Staff. Wagner served five years on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as a Sub-Committee Staff Director and as Committee Budget Director and Cybersecurity Coordinator.

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Panelists

Mr. Rand Beers

Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Homeland Security Advisor

National Security Council Staff

Mr. Ron Brooks

Founder and Partner

Brooks and Bawden, LLC

Mr. Ron Brooks
Founder and Partner
Brooks and Bawden, LLC

Ron Brooks is Founder and Principal at Brooks Bawden, LLC. He is a thirty-eight year law enforcement veteran with executive, investigative, and criminal intelligence expertise. As a law enforcement and homeland security policy leader, he has guided national efforts to coordinate policy development on criminal intelligence and information sharing, investigative technology, and drug enforcement.

Brooks retired in 2012 as Director of the Northern California Regional Intelligence Center (NCRIC), the designated fusion center for the San Francisco Bay Area and Silicon Valley. He was responsible for coordinating with state, local, federal, and private sector critical infrastructure partners on terrorist threat information and assessments as well as intelligence support for special events throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. Prior to being assigned as NCRIC Director, Brooks retired in 2003 from California Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement (BNE) as an Assistant Chief.

Brooks served as the Chair of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council (CICC) and Global Intelligence Working Group (GIWG), a designated Federal Advisory Committee (FACA) advising the Attorney General of the United States. The CICC developed or consulted on most criminal intelligence and information sharing policies currently in use in the U.S. including the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan, Fusion Center Guidelines, Fusion Center Baseline Capabilities, Privacy and Civil Liberties Guidelines for Fusion Centers, and Privacy Guidelines for Law Enforcement Use of Social Media. Brooks was appointed by DHS as the law enforcement representative to the White House Interagency Policy Committee on Information Sharing and Access (IPC-ISA) and contributed to development of the 2012 National Strategy for Information Sharing and Safeguarding.

Brooks served for four years as the chair of the State and Local Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Partners Board for three successive Directors of National Intelligence (DNI). He was awarded the National Intelligence Distinguished Public Service Medal in 2012 by Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

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Mr. Rich Davis

Managing Director Security

United Airlines


Mr. Michael Howell

Deputy Program Manager

Office of the Program Manager, Information Sharing Environment
Office of the Director of National Intelligence


Mr. Andy McCabe

Executive Assistant Director

National Security Branch

Federal Bureau of Investigation


Mr. Andy McCabe
Executive Assistant Director
National Security Branch
Federal Bureau of Investigation

Mr. McCabe began his career as a special agent with the FBI with the New York Division in 1996. In 2003, he became the supervisory special agent of the Eurasian Organized Crime Task Force, a joint operation with the New York City Police Department. In 2008, Mr. McCabe was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of the Washington Field Office’s Counterterrorism Division, where he managed several programs, including the division’s National Capital Response Squad, Rapid Deployment Team, Domestic Terrorism Squad, Cyber-CT Targeting Squad, and the Extraterritorial Investigations Squads. In September 2009, Mr. McCabe was selected to serve as the first director of the High-Value Interrogation Group. In May 2011, he returned to the Counterterrorism Division at FBI Headquarters as deputy assistant director to oversee the international and terrorism investigation program.

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Mr. Frank Taylor

Under Secretary, Office of Intelligence and Analysis

Department of Homeland Security


Mr. Frank Taylor
Under Secretary, Office of Intelligence and Analysis
Department of Homeland Security

Mr. Taylor became the Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis, Department of Homeland Security, on April 14, 2014. Immediately prior to this assignment, Mr. Taylor was Vice President and Chief Security Officer for the General Electric Company in Fairfield, Conn. Before GE, Mr. Taylor had a distinguished 35-year career in government service. Most recently, he served as the Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security and Director of the Office of Foreign Missions, with the rank of Ambassador. Ambassador Taylor also served as the U.S. Ambassador at Large and Coordinator for Counterterrorism for the Department of State from July 2001 to November 2002. During his 31 years of military service, Ambassador Taylor served with distinction in numerous command and staff positions, rising to the rank of Brigadier General in September 1996. In his final active duty assignment, Brigadier General Taylor was the Commander, Air Force Office of Special Investigations.

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Focus Questions

  • How do the concepts of strategic and tactical warning apply to the homeland mission? Which, if either, of these are being done well? What hampers both from being done effectively?
  • How can the U.S. Intelligence Community best be an effective partner in homeland security given the rapidly changing social and technological fabric of both society and the threats it faces?
  • What role should the private sector play in improving the warning system within the homeland security enterprise? Is the role the government currently is playing in warning the private sector adequate? If not, what needs to be enhanced and how?

IC ITE AND ITS ROLE IN ENABLING INTELLIGENCE EFFECTIVENESS, TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY

1 GIAC CPE**

Overview

Effective intelligence operations require information technologies that provide intelligence professionals, wherever they are, the ability to discover, access and exploit information efficiently. The Intelligence Community Information Technology Enterprise (IC ITE) is that enabling technology foundation for intelligence missions from the White House to the foxhole. This session will explore IC ITE strategies for delivering integrated enterprise information services that both enable broad information access and protect against unauthorized access and use in a constrained fiscal and volatile operational environment.

Moderator

Mr. Al Tarasiuk

IC Chief Information Officer

Office of the Director of National Intelligence


Mr. Al Tarasiuk
Chief Information Officer
Office of the Director of National Intelligence

President Barack Obama appointed Tarasiuk as Intelligence Community Chief Information Officer on February 17, 2011. In January 2011, he received the prestigious National Intelligence Reform Medal from the Director of National Intelligence for significant accomplishments leading to the transformation and integration of the U.S. Intelligence Community. From 2005 to 2010, he served as Chief Information Officer at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), where he was responsible for leading Enterprise Information Technology and Information Management. Prior to that, he was Director of CIA's Information Services Center, where he was responsible for the execution of Enterprise IT services in support of CIA's global mission. He has served in other senior executive, technical and program management roles throughout his distinguished career.

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Panelists

Mr. Lonny Anderson

Director, Technology Directorate

National Security Agency

Mr. Jerry Pender

Chief Information Officer

Federal Bureau of Investigation


Mr. Jerry Pender
Chief Information Officer
Federal Bureau of Investigation

In August 2012, Mr. Jerome Pender was named as executive assistant director of the FBI’s Information and Technology Branch. Mr. Pender joined the FBI in 2003 as the deputy assistant director of the Information Services Branch of the Criminal Justice Information Services Division. In this role, he was responsible for the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System, the National Crime Information Center 2000, the National Instant Criminal Background Check System and the Law Enforcement Online service. Before joining the FBI, Mr. Pender was employed for 13 years with UBS, a worldwide financial services company, rising to the position of executive director for information technology. Mr. Pender graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy and has a master’s degree in computer science from Johns Hopkins University.

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Ms. Annie Redmond

Chief Information Officer

Department of the Army (Intelligence)


Ms. Annie Redmond
Chief Information Officer
Department of the Army (Intelligence)

In October 2013, Ms. Redmond was appointed as the Director, Army Intelligence Community Information Management for the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, G-2. She provides operational and technical advice and oversight of infrastructure and Intelligence Community information management/information technology endeavors. Prior to this assignment, Ms. Redmond was the Special Advisor for Enterprise Intelligence Operations as a Defense Intelligence Senior Level for the Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). Ms. Redmond joined the Civil Service in 2005 and served as the Joint Staff J2’s Director for Enterprise Integration and Information Sharing. Ms. Redmond previously served in the U.S. Army, 1984 – 2005, retiring following 21 years of experience and progressive leadership as an Army Military Intelligence Officer.

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Mr. David White

Chief Information Officer

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Focus Questions

  • How can technology and the IC ITE architecture be leveraged to balance the natural paranoia of protecting methods and sources with information sharing?
  • It is one thing to give analysts the data they request, but can the IC ITE take it to the next level by allowing analysts to have unfettered access to data for discovery?
  • Can the IC ITE be leveraged to achieve the accountability and transparency requirements of new oversight and policy regimes?

TEN YEARS OF INTELLIGENCE REFORM: IS THE IC BETTER PREPARED FOR CHALLENGING ENVIRONMENTS?


Overview

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the passage of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act (IRTPA). The law introduced structural changes in the Intelligence as well as the National and Homeland Security Communities to ensure the effectiveness, transparency and accountability. During this past decade, debate has shifted from the wisdom of the structural changes it introduced to the complex threat, fiscal, policy and legal environment in which the intelligence service must conduct its vital mission. This session will examine IRTPA’s contribution to preparing the Intelligence Community for complex operating environments, what has worked well and where work remains to be done.

Moderator

Mr. Michael Allen

Founder/Managing Director

Beacon Global Strategies


Mr. Michael Allen
Managing Director
Beacon Global Strategies

Mr. Allen is a founder and managing director of Beacon Global Strategies and author of Blinking Red: Crisis and Compromise in American Intelligence After 9/11. From 2011 – 2013, Mr. Allen served as the Majority Staff Director of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI). Prior to joining the HPSCI, he was director for the Bipartisan Policy Center’s successor to the 9/11 Commission, the National Security Preparedness Group. Previously, Mr. Allen served in the White House for seven years in a variety of national security policy and legislative roles, including Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Counter-proliferation Strategy at the National Security Council (NSC), Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Legislative Affairs at the NSC, and Special Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs in the White House’s Homeland Security Council.

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Panelists

The Honorable Dennis Blair

Former Director of National Intelligence


The Honorable John Negroponte

Former Director of National Intelligence

INSA Chairman of the Board


The Honorable John Negroponte
Former Director of National Intelligence
Ambassador John D. Negroponte became the Chairman of the Intelligence and National Security Alliance on January 1, 2013. As Chairman, he works with the INSA Board and staff to further develop and implement INSA’s strategic vision and programs. Before coming to INSA he became Vice Chairman of McLarty Associates and began a position at Yale University as a distinguished senior research fellow in 2009. Prior to this, his recent positions in government have been Director of National Intelligence under President Bush and Deputy Secretary of State. While in industry from 1997 to 2001, he was executive vice president of the McGraw-Hill Companies. He has held many government positions over the past 50 years; serving as Ambassador to Honduras, Mexico, the Philippines, the United Nations, and Iraq; also serving on the National Security Council staff as Director for Vietnam under President Nixon and Deputy National Security Advisor under President Reagan. He has received numerous awards: twice receiving the State Department’s Distinguished Service Medal, the highest award conferred by the Secretary; and the National Security Medal for his contributions to national security by President Bush.

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Mr. David Shedd

Acting Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

Focus Questions

  • Is the nation a safer place as a result of the IRTPA’s reforms and their implementation?
  • What has been the most significant success of the reforms and what has not worked as envisioned?
  • Are there new reforms that need to be put in place?
  • How have the reforms impacted data sharing and collaboration?
11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
PLENARY SESSION TWO: WHAT SHOULD THE NATION EXPECT FROM ITS INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY?

Overview

The Intelligence Community celebrates success in private and suffers failure in public. Since the turn of the century, the Intelligence Community’s mixed performance record coupled with disclosures about intelligence sources and methods that some find questionable have caused a breakdown in public confidence. This session will explore what the citizenry should expect from the Intelligence Community given the threats the nation faces, and what trade-offs, if any, the country willing to make for this capability.


Moderator

Ms. Kimberly Dozier

Contributing Writer
The Daily Beast & Bradley Chair

U.S. Army War College


Ms. Kimberly Dozier
Correspondent
The Daily Beast

Ms. Dozier covers special operations and counter-terrorism for The Daily Beast, after four years on the intelligence beat for The Associated Press, making several trips to cover the war in Afghanistan and terrorism in neighbouring Pakistan. She covered national security for CBS News in Washington from 2007 to 2010. In a fourteen-year-career overseas, she covered the Middle East and Europe as a CBS News TV correspondent, covering conflict zones including Iraq, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Kosovo and Northern Ireland. Earlier, she worked for The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle and the BBC World Service.

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Panelists

Mr. John Brennan

Director

Central Intelligence Agency

Ms. Letitia Long

Director

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency


Letitia Long
Director
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Ms. Long is the Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the first female head of a major U.S. intelligence agency. Prior to her appointment at NGA, she served as the Deputy Director of DIA from 2006 to 2010. Ms. Long also served as the Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence and as the first Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence (Policy, Requirements and Resources). Prior to those positions, she was assigned as the Executive Director for Intelligence Community Affairs for the Director of Central Intelligence, responsible for community-wide policy formulation, resource planning, and program assessment and evaluation. From 1994 to 1998, Ms. Long held a number of positions at the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) including serving as DIA’s first chief information officer. In 1988, Ms. Long joined the Office of the Director of Naval Intelligence, where she managed intelligence research and development programs. Her civilian federal career in the Department of Defense and Intelligence Community began with the U.S. Navy at the David Taylor Research Center in 1982.

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ADM Michael Rogers

Commander, US Cyber Command

Director, National Security Agency/CSS


ADM Michael Rogers
Commander, U.S. Cyber Command
Director, National Security Agency/CSS

Admiral Rogers assumed his present duties as Commander, U.S. Cyber Command and Director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service in April 2014. Since becoming a flag officer in 2007, Rogers has also served as the director for Intelligence for both the Joint Chiefs of Staff and U.S. Pacific Command, and most recently as Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. TENTH Fleet. Rogers' joint service both afloat and ashore has been extensive and, prior to becoming a flag officer, he served at U.S. Atlantic Command, CJTF 120 Operation Support Democracy (Haiti), Joint Force Maritime Component Commander, Europe, and the Joint Staff. His Joint Staff duties (2003-2007) included leadership of the J3 Computer Network Attack/Defense and IO Operations shops, EA to the J3, EA to two Directors of the Joint Staff, special assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, director of the Chairman's Action Group, and a leader of the JCS Joint Strategic Working Group.

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Mr. David Shedd

Acting Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

 

Focus Questions

  • Intelligence officials often say their successes cannot be publicized. Accepting that at face value, there are a number of instances in which the U.S. appears to have been caught off guard, for example, the Arab Spring, Benghazi, Syria, Ukraine, and Iraq’s WMD capabilities. How do you see the Intelligence Community’s performance in these instances?
  • Revelations in the press about NSA activities have generated an important public debate, and the Administration and Congress have each proposed changes to better balance national security and privacy. What do you think about these changes?
  • What does a successful Intelligence Community look like? Can success be measured in any meaningful way? How that might be communicated to the public?
2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
TRACK BREAKOUT SESSIONS

MAINTAINING THE CYBER R&D EDGE

Overview

Historically, U.S. government R&D investments have led to significant inventions that ultimately transitioned to the commercial sector for scaling and commercialization. Since 1980, commercial R&D spending has far surpassed that of the government, with more than $250 billion invested in commercial R&D in 2014 alone. Some cyber R&D takes place in government agencies and more in academia. However, the vast majority is in the private sector, which owns the network and the data as well as the profits they create. This session will explore the need for a new cyber R&D partnership across government, academia and the private sector to ensure the strategic advantage in cyber operations for the United States and its allies.

 

Moderator

Mr. Chris Inglis

Former Deputy Director

National Security Agency


Mr. Chris Inglis
Former Deputy Director
National Security Agency

Mr. Inglis served for over seven years as the Deputy Director and senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency. Mr. Inglis acted as the Agency's chief operating officer, responsible for guiding and directing strategies, operations, and policy. Mr. Inglis began his career at NSA as a computer scientist within the National Computer Security Center. His NSA assignments include service across information assurance, policy, time-sensitive operations, and signals intelligence organizations. Promoted to NSA's Senior Executive Service in 1997, he subsequently served in a variety of senior leadership assignments culminating in his selection as the NSA Deputy Director. He twice served away from NSA Headquarters, first as a visiting professor of computer science at the U.S. Military Academy (1991 – 1992) and later as the U.S. Special Liaison to the United Kingdom (2003 – 2006).

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Panelists

Dr. Pradeep Khosla

Chancellor

University of California, San Diego



Dr. Pradeep Khosla
Chancellor
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Khosla, an internationally renowned electrical and computer engineer, began his tenure as UC San Diego’s eighth Chancellor on August 1, 2012. Dr. Khosla previously served as Dean of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. There, he set the strategic direction for undergraduate and graduate education and research, and was elected University Professor, the highest distinction a faculty member could achieve. Chancellor Khosla is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Society for Engineering Education. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Association for Advancement of Science, the American Association of Artificial Intelligence and the Indian Academy of Engineering. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Indian Academy of Science.

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RADM Matthew L. Klunder, USN

Chief of Naval Research

Director, Innovation, Technology Requirements, and Test & Evaluation
Office of Naval Research

Mr. Steve Orrin

Chief Technologist, Intel Federal LLC

Intel Corporation


Mr. Steve Orrin
Chief Technologist, Intel Federal LLC
Intel Corporation

Steve Orrin Chief Technologist for Intel Corp’s Intel Federal Division and is responsible for Cyber Security and Cloud Strategy, Architecture and Engagements. Steve has held architectural leadership positions at Intel where he has led strategy and projects on Identity, Cloud and Virtualization Security, Anti-malware, and HTML5 Security. Steve joined Intel as part of the acquisition of Sarvega, Inc. where he was their CSO. Steve was previously CTO of Sanctum, a pioneer in Web application security testing and firewall software. Prior to joining Sanctum, Steve was CTO and co-founder of LockStar, Inc. LockStar provided enterprises with the means to secure and XML/Web Service enable legacy mainframe and enterprise applications for e-business. Steve joined LockStar from SynData Technologies, Inc. where he was CTO and chief architect of their desktop e-mail and file security product. Steve is a recognized expert and frequent lecturer on enterprise security and was named one of InfoWorld's Top 25 CTO's of 2004 and, in 2009, was named a fellow at the Center for Advanced Defense Studies. Steve is a member of AFCEA, ISACA, IACR and is a co-Founder and Officer of WASC (Web Application Security Consortium).

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Focus Questions

  • How would you characterize the state of cyber R&D and the balance between investments in future capabilities and in countering current threats?
  • How is trust built between all sectors to enable the open exchange of cyber R&D information while protecting proprietary information, particularly given the multinational character of many leading cyber companies?
  • Should the private sector be allowed to gain access to high-end capabilities born in the government and academia to advance the commercial cyber R&D effort?

ASIA PACIFIC IMPERATIVES AND EFFECTIVE NATIONAL ASSESSMENTS

 

Overview

The state of the U.S. strategic assessment and indications and warning (I&W) capability has drawn criticism for not maintaining its ability to support both strategic and tactical intelligence needs of decision makers. The rebalanced national focus on Asia and the Pacific has increased the urgency for the Intelligence Community to revitalize its traditional assessment tradecraft and incorporate new techniques and methods to better leverage the global socioeconomic and technological environment. This session will examine the value of traditional I&W and explore opportunities for building upon its foundation with new approaches to produce meaningful strategic and tactical assessments for decision makers.

 

Moderator

Ambassador Robert Joseph

Senior Scholar

National Institute for Public Policy




Ambassador Robert Joseph
Senior Scholar
National Institute for Public Policy

Robert Joseph is Senior Scholar at the National Institute for Public Policy. Prior to July 2007, Ambassador Joseph served as U.S. Special Envoy for Nuclear Nonproliferation. From May 2005 until March 2007, he was Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security. In this capacity, he reported directly to the Secretary of State as the principal State Department officer for non-and counterproliferation matters, arms control, arms transfers, regional security and defense relations, and security assistance. His management responsibilities included oversight of three major bureaus headed by Assistant Secretaries of State: International Security and Nonproliferation; Political and Military Affairs; and Verification, Compliance and Implementation.

Previously, from January 2001 through November 2004, Dr. Joseph served in the National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Proliferation Strategy, Counterproliferation and Homeland Defense. He was responsible, under the supervision of the National Security Advisor, for developing and coordinating U.S. policies and strategies for preventing, deterring and defending against threats to the United States from weapons of mass destruction.

From 1992 until 2001, Dr. Joseph was Professor of National Security Studies and Director/Founder of the Center for Counterproliferation Research at the National Defense University. Earlier, he was U.S. Commissioner to the Standing Consultative Commission and Ambassador to the U.S.-Russian Commission on Nuclear Testing, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear Forces and Arms Control Policy, Nuclear Policy/Planning Officer at U.S. Mission to NATO, and Assistant Professor of International Relations/Strategic Studies at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tulane University, and Carleton College.

Dr. Joseph received his BA from Saint Louis University; his MA from the University of Chicago; and his PhD from Columbia University. His awards include the National Defense University President's Award for Individual Achievement and the National Nuclear Security Administration Gold Medal for Distinguished Service. He also received the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Civilian Service (and Bronze Palm), multiple Senior Executive Service Meritorious Achievements citations, and was the recipient of the annual Ronald Reagan award for his contributions to U.S. missile defense.

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Panelists

RADM Paul Becker, USN

Director for Intelligence

Joint Chiefs of Staff



RADM Paul Becker, USN
Director for Intelligence
Joint Chiefs of Staff

Rear Adm. Becker has been the Director for Intelligence (J2) on the Joint Chiefs of Staff since September 2013. Previous flag assignments include Director for Intelligence with United States Pacific Command in Hawaii, Vice Director of Intelligence for the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Washington, D.C., and Director of Intelligence for the International Security Assistance Force Joint Command in Afghanistan. In addition to service in Afghanistan from 2009 to 2010, his duty with U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) since 9/11 includes: Commanding Officer of CENTCOM’s Joint Intelligence Center in Tampa, Fla., from 2007 to 2009; Director of Intelligence (N2) for U.S. Naval Forces Central Command in Bahrain from 2005 to 2007; Intelligence Watch Officer in the Combined Air Operations Center at Prince Sultan Air Base in Saudi Arabia in 2003 during early Iraqi Freedom operations; and, N2 for the U.S. Navy’s Task Force 50 in the Northern Arabian Sea from 2001 to 2002 during early Enduring Freedom operations.

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Mr. Scott Bray

National Intelligence Manager, Far East



Ms. Catherine Johnston

Director for Analysis
Defense Intelligence Agency

Dr. Roger Mason, Jr.

Senior Vice President, National Security and Intelligence

Noblis


Dr. Roger Mason, Jr.
Senior Vice President, National Security and Intelligence
Noblis

Dr. Mason serves as senior vice president and corporate officer responsible for the overall direction of Noblis’ national security missions including intelligence, defense, homeland security, and law enforcement. In this role, Dr. Mason is also responsible for overseeing Noblis’ two wholly owned subsidiaries, Noblis ESI, LLC and Noblis NSP, LLC. Both organizations are dedicated to supporting the Intelligence Community (IC). He returns to Noblis after five years of service in the Intelligence Community (IC) as the first Assistant Director of National Intelligence for Systems and Resource Analyses (ADNI/SRA). In this capacity, Dr. Mason served as the DNI’s principal intelligence officer and trusted advisor on all matters dealing with intelligence capabilities, resources, requirements, systems analysis, program evaluation, and cost analysis. He led the establishment of this new capability that combined operations research, decision sciences, and business analytics to aid the DNI and senior intelligence agency leaders in making difficult decisions on complex issues that spanned every aspect of intelligence from overhead space technologies to counterterrorism. In recognition of his service, Dr. Mason was awarded the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal—the IC’s highest award. In addition, he received medallions of excellence from intelligence agency directors and led SRA to four National Intelligence Meritorious Unit Commendations.

Prior to federal service, Dr. Mason served in a number of senior executive positions in the national security sector including Vice President at Noblis, Director at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and General Manager of the Advanced Systems Group at General Dynamics (formerly Veridian). Earlier in his career, he led a number of advanced programs combining technology development, system integration, and field operations for military and intelligence missions.

He is a nationally recognized expert in intelligence capabilities, weapons of mass destruction (WMD) technology, operations research, systems integration, and change leadership. He has published over 35 papers in peer-reviewed journals and symposia and holds two U.S. patents dealing with advanced materials and collection devices.

Dr. Mason earned his doctorate and master’s degrees in engineering physics (nuclear) from the University of Virginia, a master’s degree in business administration from Northwestern University (Kellogg School), and a bachelor’s degree in physics from The George Washington University.

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Focus Questions

  • With the stated rebalance to Asia and the Pacific, how has the need for more traditional forms of indications and warning analysis changed? Can today’s strategic assessment framework meet the intelligence needs associated with this region?
  • Can the Intelligence Community maintain effective assessment capabilities against both state and non-state threats?
  • What other forms of analytical assessments might serve as a means to provide adequate insight into an adversary’s intentions? Is the Intelligence Community positioned to leverage these techniques effectively?

THE INTERNET OF THINGS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENCE

1 GIAC CPE, 1 CompTIA CEU for A+, Network+, and Security+**

Overview

If the charge for intelligence professionals is to “know something about everything,” then they surely welcome the vision of the Internet of Things (IoT). Eventually, the IoT will provide the ability to equip all objects in the world with minuscule identifying devices or machine-readable unique identifiers and represent them in an Internet-like structure. Corporations are today investing heavily in research and early deployment of robust IoT systems. They successfully are marrying technology and process improvement to achieve advances in fields as diverse as waste management, urban planning, environmental sensing, social interaction, health care, emergency response, intelligent shopping, smart meters and home automation. The National Intelligence Council (NIC) featured the IoT in its “Disruptive Technologies Global Trends 2025” report, noting that IoT brings rich new sources of data that present both challenges and opportunities to the National Security Community. This session will explore the implications of the unbridled IoT revolution for intelligence.

 

Moderators

Dr. Rhonda Anderson, PhD

Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Science & Technology

Office of the Director of National Intelligence
National Intelligence Council

Mr. Lewis Shepherd

Director and General Manager

Microsoft Institute
Microsoft Corporation

Panelists

Mr. Robert Gourley

Partner

Cognitio Corporation

Dr. Chris Reed

Program Manager, Office of Smart Collection

Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA)

Mr. Mark White

Principal and CTO, Global Consulting Technology

Deloitte Consulting LLP

 

Focus Questions

  • As sensors and smart devices become ubiquitous, is it realistic for the Intelligence Community to pursue a “collect everything” mission? What are the criteria for prioritizing and discriminating among classes, categories and scales of discrete or aggregated sensor data?
  • Does the IC ITE model and infrastructure offer the flexibility and scale required for exploitation of the IoT in an efficient and effective manner?
  • Will the National Security Community be capable of offering security protection, including security advice, for massive commercially or privately owned networks of sensors and remotely controllable devices? Should it be?

SECURITY CLEARANCE REFORM

 

Overview

Technology advances, new public-private partnerships, societal changes, cost and security breaches are compelling the government to rethink the personnel security clearance system and how it gauges trust in the work force charged with maintaining national security. Getting it right depends on the government’s ability to articulate and implement processes that leverage technologies and information and delineate boundaries to protect individual privacy rights. Strategies and solutions are being proposed from a variety of perspectives, including a Presidential commission, the Director of National Intelligence, the Department of Defense, Congress and INSA. This session will assess the strategies, prospects, challenges and opportunities for personnel security reform.

 

Moderator

Ms. Katherine Hibbs Pherson

Chief Executive Officer

Pherson Associates, LLC

 

Panelists

Mr. Dustin Brown

Deputy Associate Director for Performance and Personnel Management

Office of Management and Budget


Mr. Dustin Brown
Deputy Associate Director for Performance and Personnel Management
Office of Management and Budget

Dustin Brown is the Deputy Associate Director for Performance and Personnel Management at the Office of Management and Budget. He is the career head of the Office of Performance and Personnel Management which leads government-wide efforts to improve program performance and works with the Office of Personnel Management to advance Federal human capital issues. He also helps lead the inter-agency Performance Improvement Council, which coordinates the government’s performance management policies and requirements.

Dustin joined OMB’s Housing Branch in August, 2001, has worked in OMB’s International Affairs Division, and as the OMB Director’s Special Assistant for Policy. He has a Masters in Public Administration from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University and has a bachelor's degree from Manchester College in Indiana. Dustin also received a Fulbright Scholarship to study in Quito, Ecuador.

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Mr. Stephen Lewis

Security Policy & Oversight Division

Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Intelligence)


Mr. Stephen Lewis
Security Policy & Oversight Division
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Intelligence)

Mr. Lewis is the Deputy Director for Personnel, Industrial and Physical Security Policy in the OUSD(I) Security Policy & Oversight Division. After receiving a Master of Arts degree in Political Science from Tufts University, Mr. Lewis worked in the mutual funds industry. In 1981, he began his employment with the Defense Security Service (DSS) which was then known as Defense Investigative Service. In addition to various assignments in the New England Region, Mr. Lewis also worked in the Capital Region and the Office of Industrial Security International in Brussels, Belgium. From 1987 until 1990, Mr. Lewis was Chief of the San Diego Industrial Security Field Office, and then served as the Director of Industrial Security for the Southeast Region of DSS. In 1995, Mr. Lewis was reassigned to DSS Headquarters where he worked on Foreign Ownership and Industrial Security Clearance Policy. In 1999, he was promoted to the position of Policy Staff Director and subsequently served as the Acting Director for Operations, Assistant Chief of Staff and as the Director of the Industrial Base Clearance Requirements Office. In 2002, he was reassigned to the position of Deputy Director for Industrial Security Policy. In 2008, Mr. Lewis transferred to the Security Directorate in the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Intelligence & Security). In March, 2009, Mr. Lewis was promoted to Defense Intelligence Senior Leader.

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Ms. Lisa Loss

Assistant Director, External Affairs

Federal Investigative Services
US Office of Personnel Management

Mr. Kirk McConnell

Professional Staff Member

Senate Armed Services Committee

Mr. Brian Prioletti

Assistant Director, Special Security Directorate

Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive
Office of the Director National Intelligence

Ms. Carrie Wibben

Director Program Management Office

Performance Accountability Council
Office of Personnel Management

 

Focus Questions

  • What is the government’s plan and timeline for reforming the personnel security process? What are the major challenges and obstacles to making it work?
  • What is the best way to use technology to accelerate reform for a process that has changed little in 60 years?
  • How will the success of the reforms be measured in both initial vetting and continuous monitoring of cleared individuals?  How will the investigators, adjudicators and decision makers be prepared to weigh ambiguous and contradictory data while ensuring that individual privacy rights are protected?
4:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
PLENARY SESSION THREE: WHAT LEVEL OF TRANSPARENCY IS ACCEPTABLE FOR INTELLIGENCE?

 

Overview

The Intelligence Community is charged with protecting US national security in a complex and volatile world. Within this turbulent environment, unanticipated events—often characterized as intelligence failures—and unauthorized disclosures—often characterized as whistleblowing—have led the public to question the competence, and even the relevance, of the Intelligence Community and why its structures and processes are not more transparent. This session will explore the dynamics of this debate and the degree to which the Intelligence Community can function more openly.

 

Moderator

Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland


Dr. William Nolte
Research Professor
Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education
School of Public Policy
University of Maryland

Dr. Nolte is professor and director of the Center for Intelligence Research and Education at the School of Public Policy, University of Maryland. He was the director of education and training in the office of the Director of National Intelligence and chancellor of the National Intelligence University. He is a former Deputy Assistant Director of Central Intelligence, Central Intelligence Agency. He was Director of Training, Chief of Legislative Affairs and Senior Intelligence Advisor at the National Security Agency. He also served as Deputy National Intelligence Officer for the Near East and South Asia during the Gulf War. He has taught at several Washington area universities, is on the board of CIA's Studies in Intelligence, and directed the Intelligence Fellows Program.

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Panelists

Mr. Marvin Kalb

Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice, Emeritus

Harvard Kennedy School


Mr. Marvin Kalb
Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice, Emeritus
Harvard Kennedy School

Mr. Kalb is the Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and Senior Fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy. He was the Shorenstein Center's founding Director and Edward R. Murrow Professor of Press and Public Policy from 1987 to 1999. Mr. Kalb is also a visiting scholar at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. His distinguished journalism career encompasses 30 years of award-winning reporting for CBS and NBC News as Chief Diplomatic Correspondent, Moscow bureau chief and anchor of "Meet The Press." Kalb has authored or co-authored 12 non-fiction books and two best-selling novels. Mr. Kalb also hosts The Kalb Report, a program about media ethics and responsibility at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. He is, in addition, a regular contributor to NPR radio and television programs.

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The Honorable I. Charles McCullough III

Intelligence Community Inspector General

Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Mr. David Medine

Chairman

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board



Mr. David Medine
Chairman
Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board

Mr. Medine started full-time as Chairman of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board on May 27, 2013. Previously, Mr. Medine was an Attorney Fellow for the Security and Exchange Commission and a Special Counsel at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. From 2002 to 2012, he was a partner in the law firm WilmerHale where his practice focused on privacy and data security, having previously served as a Senior Advisor to the White House National Economic Council from 2000 to 2001. From 1992 to 2000, Mr. Medine was the Associate Director for Financial Practices at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) where, in addition to enforcing financial privacy laws, he took the lead on internet privacy, chaired a federal advisory committee on privacy issues, and was part of the team that negotiated a privacy safe harbor agreement with the European Union. Before joining the FTC, Mr. Medine taught at the Indiana University (Bloomington) School of Law and the George Washington University School of Law.

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Mr. Michael Woods

Vice President and Associate General Counsel
National Security and Public Safety

Verizon Communications



Mr. Michael Woods
Vice President and Associate General Counsel
National Security and Public Safety
Verizon

Michael J. Woods is a Vice President and Associate General Counsel at Verizon. He leads Verizon’s national security and public safety policy teams, and provides legal advice to Verizon components engaged in these areas. He also provides assistance on legislation, regulatory issues, and policy relating to cybersecurity and information sharing. He manages Verizon’s participation in a number of public-private partnerships with the U.S. government.

Woods is a national security lawyer with specific expertise in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), the USA PATRIOT Act and other legal authorities relating to intelligence and counterintelligence operations.

Prior to his role in Verizon, Woods served as counsel in Office of Law & Policy of the National Security Division at the Justice Department; as chief of the National Security Law Unit at the FBI; as counsel to the National Counterintelligence Executive; and as a Department of Justice environmental crimes prosecutor. In private practice, he served as the chief operating officer and general counsel of a company that supplied professional services to the defense and intelligence communities.

Woods has published law review articles on national security law issues, including articles relating to Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act. He has taught national security law at the FBI Academy, the DoD Joint Counterintelligence Training Academy, and George Mason University School of Law. Woods is a graduate of the Harvard Law School (1992) and Oxford University (1987). He is based at the company’s offices in Washington, D.C.

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Focus Questions

  • Do the disclosures of classified information that Edward Snowden supplied to the media advance or damage the national interest?
  • What steps must the Intelligence Community take to assure the public that its activities are consistent with U.S. law and values and are effectively overseen?
  • What does the Intelligence Community need to do to strike a balance between effectiveness and transparency that legislative and executive branch authorities and the public will accept?
  • Do the provisions of 18 US Code, Section 798, providing criminal penalties for publishing or otherwise disclosing cryptologic or communications intelligence information apply to all citizens? Are the media exempt?
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

SEPTEMBER 19, 2014

7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m.
7:45 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
WELCOME, SUMMARY OF DAY ONE AND DAY TWO PREVIEW

Ms. Maureen Baginski

Chair

AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Intelligence and National Security Summit Co-Chair

Ambassador Joe DeTrani

President

Intelligence and National Security Alliance

Intelligence and National Security Summit Co-Chair

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Congressman Mike Rogers

Chairman

House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

8:30 a.m. – 8:50 a.m.
KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger

Ranking Member

House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

8:50 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
PLENARY SESSION FOUR: WHAT IS APPROPRIATE INTELLIGENCE OVERSIGHT?

 

Overview

The Intelligence Community operates in a necessarily opaque universe molded around an array of complex authorities and limitations that both enable intelligence operations and ensure that fundamental democratic values are maintained. Although secrecy is necessary for effective intelligence operations, three imperatives must be met both by the Intelligence Community itself and the external authorities that oversee it: protection of classified information; stewardship of taxpayer dollars; and compliance with laws in the conduct of intelligence operations. This session will examine these imperatives and explore if they and the oversight mechanisms designed to ensure they are sufficient.

 

Moderator

Mr. J.J. Green

National Security Correspondent
WTOP News Radio

 

Panelists

The Honorable Eleanor Hill

Partner

King & Spalding

Former DoD IG; Staff Director on Joint Congressional Inquiry of 9/11 Attacks


The Honorable Eleanor Hill
Partner
King & Spalding

Ms. Hill is a partner in King and Spalding’s Government Advocacy and Public Policy Practice Group, where she focuses on Congressional and other government investigations, corporate internal investigations, legislative and policy issues, compliance matters, and issues pertaining to homeland security and intelligence. She also leads the firm’s Homeland Security practice team. Ms. Hill has over 33 years of experience handling investigations in both the executive and legislative branches of government and in the private sector. Recognized for her investigative expertise, in 2002 the House and Senate Intelligence Committees asked her to lead the historic, bipartisan, and bicameral Joint Congressional Inquiry on the September 11 attacks. Ms. Hill has also served as Inspector General to the Department of Defense, has led numerous domestic and international Congressional investigations on behalf of the United States Senate’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, and served as the Subcommittee’s Chief Counsel and Staff Director.

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Mr. Len Moodispaw

Founder, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer

The KEYW Holding Company




Mr. Len Moodispaw
Founder, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer
The KEYW Holding Company

Mr. Moodispaw has served as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), President & Chairman of the board of directors of KEYW since it began operations on August 4, 2008. Prior to the founding of KEYW, Mr. Moodispaw was President and CEO for Essex Corporation, or Essex, from 2000 until January 2007, and Chairman of the board of directors of Essex from 2005 to January 2007. Essex provided advanced signal, image, information processing, information assurance and cybersecurity solutions, primarily for U.S. Government intelligence and defense customers, as well as for commercial customers. In 2007, Northrop Grumman acquired Essex, where he served as a Vice President, responsible for managing Essex as a subsidiary within Northrop Grumman Mission Systems from January 2007 to July 2008. From 1965 to 1978, Mr. Moodispaw was a senior manager in the National Security Agency (NSA) and later engaged in the private practice of law. Mr. Moodispaw is the founder of the Security Affairs Support Association, the predecessor to the Intelligence and National Security Alliance.

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Mr. Kenneth Wainstein

Partner and Chair White Collar Defense and Investigations Group

Cadwalder, Wickersham & Taft LLP



Mr. Kenneth Wainstein
Partner and Chair White Collar Defense and Investigations Group
Cadwalder, Wickersham & Taft LLP

Kenneth Wainstein is Chair of the white-collar group at Cadwalader, where he focuses his practice on corporate internal investigations and civil and criminal enforcement proceedings. Ken spent over 20 years in a variety of law enforcement and national security positions in the government. Between 1989 and 2001, Ken served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in both the Southern District of New York and the District of Columbia, where he handled criminal prosecutions ranging from public corruption to gang prosecution cases and held a variety of supervisory positions, including Acting United States Attorney. In 2001, he was appointed Director of the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys, where he provided oversight and support to the 94 U.S. Attorneys’ Offices. Between 2002 and 2004, Ken served as General Counsel of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and then as Chief of Staff to Director Robert S. Mueller III. In 2004, Ken was appointed and then confirmed as United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, where he had the privilege to lead the largest United States Attorney’s Office in the country. In 2006, the U.S. Senate confirmed Ken as the first Assistant Attorney General for National Security. In that position, Ken established and led the new National Security Division, which consolidated DOJ’s law enforcement and intelligence activities on counterterrorism and counterintelligence matters. In 2008, after 19 years at the Justice Department, Ken was named Homeland Security Advisor by President George W. Bush. In this capacity, he coordinated the nation’s counterterrorism, homeland security, infrastructure protection, and disaster response and recovery efforts. He advised the President, convened and chaired meetings of the Cabinet Officers on the Homeland Security Council, and oversaw the inter-agency coordination process for homeland security and counterterrorism programs.

Close

 

Focus Questions

  • How does Congress perform its oversight function of intelligence functions with respect to legal compliance and fiscal responsibility?
  • On the judicial side of the government, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court plays a critical role in balancing the government’s need to perform intelligence functions and the people’s right of reasonable expectation of privacy. What actions can the Court take to enforce accountability in this regard?
  • In the world of intelligence, keeping up with advancing technologies creates challenges and opportunities for oversight. As technology evolves, how do existing internal and external oversight mechanisms keep pace?
10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
10:45 a.m. – Noon
TRACK BREAKOUT SESSIONS

DATA BREACHES – WHO CAN YOU TRUST?

1 GIAC CPE, 1 CompTIA CEU for Security+**

Overview

Data breaches have become such a regular occurrence that the public risks becoming numb to them. Whether they occur at the hands of a digitally enabled insider or outsider, their impact may not be fully realized until well after the event has taken place. This session will explore the social, economic, and political consequences of data breaches, as well as new mitigation and prevention strategies.

 

Moderators

Ms. Dawn Cappelli, CISSP

Director, Insider Risk Management

Rockwell Automation



Ms. Dawn Cappelli, CISSP
Director, Insider Risk Management
Rockwell Automation

Ms. Cappelli, CISSP is Director, Insider Risk Management at Rockwell Automation. She is responsible for design and execution of Rockwell’s insider risk management program to deter, detect, and respond to malicious insider activity across the global enterprise while protecting privacy and civil liberties of employees. Ms. Cappelli joined Rockwell from Carnegie Mellon University where she was Founder and Director of the CERT Insider Threat Center. She is recognized as one of the world's leaders in insider threat mitigation, and has worked with government and industry leaders on national strategy issues. She has worked on the insider threat problem since 2001 in partnership with the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Secret Service, other federal agencies, the intelligence community, private industry, and academia. Prior to her work at CMU, Dawn worked at Westinghouse developing software for nuclear power plants. Dawn co-authored the book "The CERT Guide to Insider Threats: How to Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Information Technology Crimes (Theft, Sabotage, Fraud)."

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Mr. Dean Hall

Associate Executive Assistant Director/

Deputy Chief Information Officer

Federal Bureau of Investigation

 

Panelists

Ms. Arlette Hart

Chief Information Security Officer

Federal Bureau of Investigation


Ms. Arlette Hart
Chief Information Officer
Federal Bureau of Investigation

As the FBI’s Chief Information Security Officer, Ms. Hart is responsible for enabling the FBI to accomplish its core missions securely. Ms. Hart joined the FBI in 2010, directing the Bureau’s computer network defense, compliance, and Insider Threat functions. Ms. Hart serves as the executive for the Bureau’s operational security program. The program includes computer network defense, advanced persistent threats, and the technical discovery, investigation, and mitigation of malicious insiders. Ms. Hart brings technology management and deployment skills to bear on the security arena, driving the Bureaus’ security architecture from networks to mobile devices, and from the perimeter to host-based protections.

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Dr. Peng Ning

Vice President, Enterprise Security

Samsung Research America



Dr. Peng Ning
Vice President, Enterprise Security
Samsung Research America

Dr. Peng Ning is Vice President, Enterprise Security at Samsung Research America, leading the Samsung KNOX R&D team in Santa Clara, CA. His team has successfully developed and/or commercialized multiple mobile security features for Android, including TIMA real-time kernel protection, trusted boot, attestation, TrustZone based key store and client certificate management, smart card support, SE for Android, application container, VPN framework, and universal MDM support. Peng is currently on leave from North Carolina State University, where he is Professor in the Department of Computer Science in College of Engineering. He joined NC State University in August 2001 after he graduated from George Mason University with a PhD degree in Information Technology.

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Mr. John Stafford

Program and Consulting Director of Insider Threat Management and Strategic Threat Intelligence

Caterpillar Inc.


Mr. John Stafford
Program and Consulting Director of Insider Threat Management and Strategic Threat Intelligence
Caterpillar Inc.

John H. Stafford is the Program and Consulting Director of Insider Threat Management and Strategic Threat Intelligence for Caterpillar’s Enterprise Security Risk Management team. He has been with Caterpillar’s security program since 2010. His principal focus is on the protection of Caterpillar’s technical trade secrets and on the development of “over-the-horizon” intelligence that informs the enterprise about non-traditional business risks.

Mr. Stafford began his career with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1985 as a Special Agent, where he led investigations under the Criminal, Counter Terrorism, and Counter Intelligence Programs over a span of 25 years. He held investigative and leadership positions in the Sacramento, Springfield, and Washington, D.C. field offices, as well as FBI Headquarters and Quantico. In 2010, together with an exceptional team of investigators, he received the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service.

Mr. Stafford holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Illinois College and a Law Degree from Southern Illinois University.

Close

Mr. Randy Trzeciak

Senior Manager, CERT Program

Software Engineering Institute

Carnegie Mellon University

 

Focus Questions

  • The unauthorized disclosures by Pvt. Bradley Manning, USA, were the catalyst for Executive Order 13587–Structural Reforms to Improve the Security of Classified Networks and the Responsible Sharing and Safeguarding of Classified Information. Since then, other significant breaches have occurred. What additional countermeasures are necessary to improve the protection of data?
  • Nearly all highly visible breaches focus on the loss of data, whether it is personal, intellectual, economic, intelligence or political. Has the public become complacent; ignoring the concerns that vital infrastructure is at risk of being compromised?
  • There has been an erosion of public confidence in companies that have acknowledged the loss of personal data through theft. In some cases, this has led to a rapid decline in market share. Sharing the lessons learned from these breaches is important, but how can it be done without causing irreparable harm to the businesses?

EFFECTIVE STRATEGIC WARNING

 

Overview

Historically, strategic warning has included subsets of information and insight such as leadership intentions and military readiness. While the global environment has not reduced the need for this insight, issues surrounding privacy, transparency and accountability have affected the way in which the Intelligence Community considers data collection and analysis. This session will assess the resulting implications for maintaining an acceptable level of strategic warning, including the currency of analytic tradecraft and counterintelligence posture relative to the intelligence threat posed by adversaries.

 

Moderator

Mr. Charles Allen

Principal

Chertoff Group

Panelists

Mr. Andrew Hallman

Deputy Director for Intelligence for Strategic Programs

Central Intelligence Agency



Ms. Carmen Medina

Specialist Leader

Deloitte





Ms. Carmen Medina
Associate Deputy Director for Strategic Assessment
Central Intelligence Agency

Carmen Medina writes and speaks on innovation in government, being an effective change agent and developing new intelligence practices for the 21st century. She joined Deloitte Consulting in January 2011 as a Specialist Leader after retiring from an almost 32 year-career at the Central Intelligence Agency. Since joining Deloitte she has helped assess the implications of Arab Spring for the Intelligence Community, identified emerging issues for the National Intelligence Council Global Trends 2030 project, and advised on how to incorporate data analytics into intelligence analysis. Her last assignment at CIA was as Director of the Center for the Study of Intelligence (CSI), from January 2007 - December 2009. As the CSI Director she developed and managed CIA’s first Agency-wide Lessons Learned Program. Her record as a visionary analytic thinker and a dedicated, caring leader made her known - inside CIA and beyond - as an articulate, passionate voice for excellence in intelligence. Most recently, she was a member of INSA’s Task Force on Expectations for Intelligence in the Information Age.

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Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland


Dr. William Nolte
Research Professor
Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education
School of Public Policy
University of Maryland

Dr. Nolte is professor and director of the Center for Intelligence Research and Education at the School of Public Policy, University of Maryland. He was the director of education and training in the office of the Director of National Intelligence and chancellor of the National Intelligence University. He is a former Deputy Assistant Director of Central Intelligence, Central Intelligence Agency. He was Director of Training, Chief of Legislative Affairs and Senior Intelligence Advisor at the National Security Agency. He also served as Deputy National Intelligence Officer for the Near East and South Asia during the Gulf War. He has taught at several Washington area universities, is on the board of CIA's Studies in Intelligence, and directed the Intelligence Fellows Program.

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Dr. Jennifer Sims

Senior Fellow

Chicago Council on Global Affairs




Dr. Jennifer Sims
Senior Fellow
Chicago Council on Global Affairs

Dr. Sims joined The Chicago Council on Global Affairs in December 2009 as a senior fellow on national intelligence. Dr. Sims also serves as professor and the director of intelligence studies at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. Dr. Sims was previously deputy assistant secretary of state for intelligence coordination and later served as an intelligence advisor to the under secretary for management and coordinator for intelligence resources and planning at the U.S. Department of State. She also served as a professional staff member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and as a legislative assistant to Senator John Danforth on foreign and defense policy. She has written many publications on defense technology and arms control and her current research addresses intelligence support to counter-terrorism, counter proliferation, and homeland security.

Close

 

Focus Questions

  • Can the Intelligence Community provide adequate warning in a more transparent environment? Are proposed changes to the U.S. collection and analysis posture a setback or an opportunity?
  • What are the implications for effective warning given counterintelligence operations in today’s world? Should the Intelligence Community assume future “data losses” and focus on developing other methods of detection and prevention?
  • Is the Intelligence Community developing tradecraft that evaluates and meaningfully incorporates unclassified information, social media and other non-traditional sources in support of warning? What is the role of the private sector in this environment?

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY TRENDS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENCE INVESTMENT

 

Overview

Current studies conclude that while the U.S. leadership in science and technology has been maintained, there has been a gradual erosion of that position with respect to the rest of the world in many areas. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence has identified high-priority technology need areas where fundamental science, innovation and discovery will benefit intelligence effectiveness, accountability and transparency in communications and sharing; human intelligence collection and operations; intelligence analysis; protection of the Intelligence Community enterprise; and technical collection. This session will look at the overall landscape of trends, needs and investments in these areas, focusing on how industry, academia and the private sector can partner to achieve outcomes for the nation that both enhance national security and ensure technology leadership.

 

Moderator

Dr. Roger Mason, Jr.

Senior Vice President, National Security and Intelligence

Noblis


Panelists

Dr. Deborah Frincke

Director of Research

National Security Agency



Dr. Deborah Frincke
Director of Research
National Security Agency

Dr. Deborah Frincke currently leads the Research Directorate of the National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS), the only “in-house” research organization in the U.S. Intelligence Community to create breakthroughs in mathematics, science, and engineering that support and enable the NSA/CSS. Under her guidance, the Research Directorate recruits personnel and maintains faculties that are world-class in fields as diverse as mathematics, computer science, cybersecurity/trustworthy computing, engineering, physics, neuroscience, cognitive psychology and linguistics. The Research Directorate engages with leading industries, universities, and national laboratories to both advance core competencies and to leverage work in overlapping disciplines. Dr. Frincke recently transitioned to the Research Directorate after leading global education and training for the NSA/CSS as Associate Director for Education and Training (ADET). While leading ADET, Dr. Frincke also served as Commandant of the National Cryptologic School and as the NSA/CSS Training Director.

Prior to joining NSA/CSS, Dr. Frincke had a threefold career encompassing academia, the Department of Energy National Laboratory system, and private industry. A nationally-recognized expert and well-cited author, she has published over 100 articles and technical reports, and she continues to speak nationally on topics from leadership to cybersecurity. She also co-leads the Basic Training Board for IEEE Security and Privacy magazine. Past professional service includes leadership and participation on numerous scientific program committees and editorial boards, such as the Journal of Computer Security, and organizational boards, including the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Program and National Intelligence Science and Technology Committee. She is a Senior Member of IEEE and an affiliate Full Professor with the Information School at the University of Washington.

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Dr. Peter Highnam

Director

Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA)


Dr. Peter Highnam
Director
Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA)

Dr. Highnam was named IARPA Director on August 30, 2012. Dr. Highnam joined IARPA in February 2009 as the Office Director for Incisive Analysis. Prior to IARPA, he was a senior advisor in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and then in the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA). From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Highnam was a DARPA program manager with programs in electronic warfare and airborne communications. Before joining DARPA, he worked for more than a decade in applied research in industry. He is a co‐inventor on three patents in commercial seismic exploration and holds a doctorate in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Dr. David Honey

Director, Science and Technology

Office of the Director of National Intelligence



Dr. David Honey
Director, Science and Technology
Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Dr. Honey serves as the Director, Science and Technology, and as the Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology. He is responsible for the development of effective strategies, policies, and programs that lead to the successful integration of science and technology capabilities into operational systems. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Honey served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering). Dr. Honey has served as the Defense Sector General Manager and a Senior Vice President in a small business pursuing innovations in the fields of advanced sensors, communications, UAVs and undersea warfare technology. Dr. Honey also served on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and was the Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Strategic Technology Office (STO).

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Dr. Allan Sonsteby

Director, Applied Research Labs

Pennsylvania State University


 

Focus Questions

  • Are the ODNI’s identified needs consistent with the trends and areas the private sector and academia are investing in, or are there other focus areas? What is the business case for private sector and academia investment?
  • What is the state of investment and focus on fundamental science, innovation and discovery in these and other key areas?
  • What is the best way to build a U.S. work force capable of contributing to these key technology research and development areas?

OPEN SOURCE INTELLIGENCE AND SOCIAL MEDIA

 

Overview

Open source intelligence fundamentally has been changed by the advent of social media. This now commonplace means by which individuals engage others yields rich information about the sentiments, intentions, capabilities and activities of individuals, groups and populations. Both the public and private sectors use this information to respond to concerns and complaints and plan future initiatives. This session’s discussion will explore how to best integrate classified and open source information to support national security objectives as well as the issues of privacy and transparency the government’s use of social media information raises.

 

Moderator

Dr. Stephen Cambone

Independent Consultant

Former Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence


Panelists

Ms. Judith Grabski

President and CEO
Inali, LLC.


Mr. Jeff Jonas

IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist


Mr. Pat O'Neil

Director for Analysis, Open Source Center

Office of the Director of National Intelligence


Mr. Rand Waltzman

Program Manager

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency


 

Focus Questions

  • How should the integration of social media and open source with classified products and analysis best be achieved?
  • What are the differences between private and government entity exploitation of social media and open source information?
  • Does the rest of the world feel differently than the U.S. about privacy and transparency issues?
  • Does the government have a greater obligation than private industry to be transparent in its use of these data sources?
Noon – 1:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
TRACK BREAKOUT SESSIONS

CYBER SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AMID VIRAL CHANGE

 

Overview

The most powerful tool for successfully navigating the complexities of cyberspace is well-trained and informed people. Approaches in education, training and certification must evolve to develop a capable work force that understands cyber in all its dimensions: technical, policy and legal, and operational. This session’s discussion will focus on strategies for a multi-disciplinary approach to cyber skills development. Specifically, it will highlight strategies that bring together in an ethical environment the technical IT domains of computer science and engineering and the skills of intelligence analysis, counterintelligence, policy and law.

 

Moderator

Dr. David Ellison

President

National Intelligence University

 

Panelists

Dr. Randy Borum

Professor

Coordinator, Strategy & Intelligence Studies

School of Information

University of South Florida


Dr. Randy Borum
Professor
Coordinator, Strategy & Intelligence Studies
School of Information
University of South Florida

Dr. Borum is a Professor and Coordinator for Strategy and Intelligence Studies in the School of Information at the University of South Florida. He has served on the DNI's Intelligence Science Board, the Defense Science Board Task Force on Understanding Human Dynamics, and as a behavioural scientist and Board-Certified Forensic Psychologist researching national and global security issues. He regularly teaches and consults with law enforcement agencies, the Intelligence Community, and Department of Defense, and has authored/ co-authored more than 120 professional publications. He has taught at the FBI Academy, FLETC; JFK Special Warfare Center and School (Ft. Bragg); Joint Special Operations University; CIA; and the US Army Intelligence Center and School (Ft. Huachuca).

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Mr. Steve Chabinsky

Senior Vice President of Legal Affairs and Chief Risk Officer

CrowdStrike



Mr. Steve Chabinsky
Senior Vice President of Legal Affairs and Chief Risk Officer
CrowdStrike

Mr. Chabinsky is General Counsel and Chief Risk Officer for the cybersecurity technology firm CrowdStrike. He is also an adjunct faculty member of George Washington University, and the cyber columnist for Security Magazine. Prior to joining CrowdStrike, he had a distinguished 17-year career with the FBI, culminating in his service as Deputy Assistant Director of the FBI's Cyber Division. Prior to that role, he was the cyber advisor to the Director of National Intelligence, after having organized and led the FBI's Cyber Intelligence program and serving as the FBI's top cyber lawyer.

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Ms. Renee Forney

Executive Director CyberSkills Management

Department of Homeland Security



Mr. Tony Packard

Deputy Chief for the College of Cyber

National Cryptologic School 




Dr. Clay Wilson

Program Director, Cybersecurity Studies

School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

American Public University System



Dr. Clay Wilson
Program Director, Cybersecurity Studies
School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math
American Public University System

Dr. Wilson is the Program Director for Cybersecurity graduate studies at the American Public University. He is past Program Director for Cybersecurity Policy at the University of Maryland University College (UMUC), where he oversaw development of new graduate-level courses. Dr. Wilson is also a former analyst for national defense policy at the Congressional Research Service where he analyzed cyber intelligence reports for the U.S. Congress and NATO committees on net-centric warfare, cybersecurity, nanotechnology, and other vulnerabilities of high-technology military systems and critical infrastructures. Dr. Wilson is a member of the Landau Network Centro Volta, International Working Group, an organization that studies issues for non-proliferation of CBRN and Cyber Weapons.

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Focus Questions

  •  In the U.S. educational system, is there sufficient emphasis on cybersecurity science fundamentals?
  • Are cybersecurity certifications necessary or desirable? Does one size fit all? If not, how many sizes should there be?
  • Beyond just the technical cyber skills, what and how are the non-technical but critically important topics like ethics, policy, culture and leadership passed on?

DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE: RESETTING FOR THE FUTURE

 

Overview

Warning support to the warfighting community continues to evolve to meet a threat that is unconventional at its core and adaptable in its philosophy. Technology-savvy and comfortable operating in an open society, this threat presents a unique challenge to tactical operations as well as strategic warning. This session will examine what has worked as well as areas for improving warning support to the warfighting community. These include the sufficiency of national and defense intelligence integration and the balance between tactical and strategic warning for military decision makers. The session also will explore how gains to date and future needs might be affected by requirements for increased transparency and accountability in intelligence operations.

 

Speaker
The Transformation of Defense Intelligence

Mr. Michael Vickers

Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence



Moderator

Mr. Kevin Baron
Executive Editor, Defense One
Government Executive Media Group

 

Panelists

RADM Paul Becker, USN

Director for Intelligence

Joint Chiefs of Staff


RADM Paul Becker, USN
Director for Intelligence
Joint Chiefs of Staff

Rear Adm. Becker has been the Director for Intelligence (J2) on the Joint Chiefs of Staff since September 2013. Previous flag assignments include Director for Intelligence with United States Pacific Command in Hawaii, Vice Director of Intelligence for the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Washington, D.C., and Director of Intelligence for the International Security Assistance Force Joint Command in Afghanistan. In addition to service in Afghanistan from 2009 to 2010, his duty with U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) since 9/11 includes: Commanding Officer of CENTCOM’s Joint Intelligence Center in Tampa, Fla., from 2007 to 2009; Director of Intelligence (N2) for U.S. Naval Forces Central Command in Bahrain from 2005 to 2007; Intelligence Watch Officer in the Combined Air Operations Center at Prince Sultan Air Base in Saudi Arabia in 2003 during early Iraqi Freedom operations; and, N2 for the U.S. Navy’s Task Force 50 in the Northern Arabian Sea from 2001 to 2002 during early Enduring Freedom operations.

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BGen Michael Groen, USMC
Director of Intelligence
Headquarters, US Marine Corps

LTG Mary Legere, USA

Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence
Headquarters, US Army

Mr. Mark Tapper

Special Adviser to the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance
Headquarters, US Air Force

RADM Christopher Tomney, USCG

Assistant Commandant for Coast Guard Intelligence & Criminal Investigations

Headquarters, US Coast Guard


RADM Christopher Tomney, USCG
Assistant Commandant for Coast Guard Intelligence & Criminal Investigations
Headquarters, United States Coast Guard

Rear Admiral Tomney assumed his current duties as Assistant Commandant for Intelligence and Criminal Investigations in May 2012. He is accountable for the Service's intelligence programs, to include counterintelligence, cyber, criminal investigations and cryptology. He has served as the School Chief for the Coast Guard's Operational Intelligence School, Deputy Director of the Coast Guard's Pacific Area Intelligence Division and briefly served as the Deputy Director of the Coast Guard's Counterintelligence Service. Upon establishment, he served as the first Director of Intelligence Operations for the Maritime Intelligence Fusion Center, Pacific. His national level intelligence experience includes serving as the Chief of the Coast Guard's Intelligence Plans and Policy Office, and he also served as Commanding Officer of the Coast Guard's Intelligence Coordination Center. Most recently, Rear Admiral Tomney served as Director, Joint Interagency Task Force West in the role as the Counter Drug Executive Agent for Commander, United States Pacific Command.

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Ms. B. Lynn Wright

Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence
Headquarters, US Navy

 

Focus Questions

  • How have the last 12 years influenced aspects of indications and warning for tactical operations? Are shortfalls addressable given the changing transparency and accountability environment?
  • Does the advancing cadre of seasoned military officers have a better appreciation for the value of and challenges to effective warning intelligence?
  • While there have been many short-term changes to tactics, techniques and procedures, are there longer term doctrinal changes that need to be considered?
  • As the drawdown from active theater warfighting operations continues, what is the best way to ensure national and military intelligence integration is accomplished?

THE FUTURE OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS, TECHNOLOGY COORDINATION AND RESPONSE: VIEWS FROM GOVERNMENT, INDUSTRY AND ACADEMIA

 

Overview

The threats our nation faces today require unprecedented coordination between industry and government.  Long gone are the days when US Government (USG) investment alone in technology provided national security advantage; the USG can no longer “buy its way out of” national security technological challenges.  In the globalized information-age, technology is driven by commercial markets measured in the trillions of dollars, and hence, the USG must collaborate (and harness, since it cannot outspend) commercial technical advances to ensure national (including economic) security.  Further complicating matters, recent unauthorized disclosures make clear the need for greater transparency in national security (and specifically cyber-focused) approaches.  Public-private partnerships are the key to advancing national security in a [cyber and information] technology-driven world.  In this breakout session, speakers will provide best practice perspectives and success stories in teaming with the government on technology and innovation.  The panel will explore the needs, benefits, and operational efficacy of public-private coordination of (information) technology and critical assets to address national security incidents.

 

Moderator

Mr. Michael Johnson

Assistant Director for Intelligence Programs and National Security Systems

Office of Science and Technology Policy
Executive Office of the President

Panelists

Mr. Steven Kelly

Director for Cybersecurity Policy

National Security Council Staff

The White House


Mr. Timothy Sample

Independent Consultant

Former President of INSA and Founder of Potomac Institute for Policy Studies

Mr. Peter Tseronis

Chief Technology Officer

Department of Energy (DOE)



Mr. Louis Tucker

President

The Foundation for Innovation and Discovery former Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Staff Director


Mr. Evan Wolff

Partner

Crowell & Moring




 

Focus Questions

  • In what ways is public-private coordination of technology accomplished now?
  • What are the triggers and thresholds for increased technological coordination among industry members and between industry and government to respond to national security incidents?
  • What are potential operational frameworks and methodologies for public-private coordination on technology mobilization and response?
  • What is the likely evolution of big data technology capabilities during the next decade? What are the associated challenges and opportunities for the effectiveness, transparency and accountability of intelligence operations?

INTELLIGENCE AND THE MILLENNIAL PERSPECTIVE

 

Overview

Millennials will soon be the largest segment of the Intelligence Community work force. Growing bodies of research point to generational differences in values and behaviors but offer conflicting perspectives about the extent to which these differences are driven by age or by the attributes of the Digital Age. This session brings together the researchers and the researched to explore the implications of these differences for the future of intelligence.

 

Moderator

Ms. Carmen Medina

Specialist Leader

Deloitte


Ms. Carmen Medina
Associate Deputy Director for Strategic Assessment
Central Intelligence Agency

Carmen Medina writes and speaks on innovation in government, being an effective change agent and developing new intelligence practices for the 21st century. She joined Deloitte Consulting in January 2011 as a Specialist Leader after retiring from an almost 32 year-career at the Central Intelligence Agency. Since joining Deloitte she has helped assess the implications of Arab Spring for the Intelligence Community, identified emerging issues for the National Intelligence Council Global Trends 2030 project, and advised on how to incorporate data analytics into intelligence analysis. Her last assignment at CIA was as Director of the Center for the Study of Intelligence (CSI), from January 2007 - December 2009. As the CSI Director she developed and managed CIA’s first Agency-wide Lessons Learned Program. Her record as a visionary analytic thinker and a dedicated, caring leader made her known - inside CIA and beyond - as an articulate, passionate voice for excellence in intelligence. Most recently, she was a member of INSA’s Task Force on Expectations for Intelligence in the Information Age.

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Speakers

Mr. Michael Bruni

ISR Capture Staffing Manager

Leidos


Mr. Michael Bruni
ISR Capture Staffing Manager
Leidos

Mr. Bruni is currently a Talent Acquisition Manager with the National Security Sector of Leidos and possesses more than 15 years of experience in human resources, recruiting, and staffing. Since joining SAIC (now Leidos) in 2005, he has taken on many roles and has led many initiatives, including talent acquisition management, sourcing, capture staffing, direct recruiting, and veteran outreach. In December 2009, Mr. Bruni was instrumental in standing up a centralized SAIC/Leidos Military Recruiting Program, designed to be a central point to recruit top talent from all branches of the military. He is also the co-facilitator of Project SAVE (Staffing Alliance of Virginia Employers), which caters to recruiters and networking.

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Capt Jesse Burdick, USMC

USMC Intelligence Fellow

Headquarters Marine Corps

Dr. Ronald Sanders

Vice President

Booz Allen Hamilton


Dr. Ronald Sanders
Vice President
Booz Allen Hamilton

A Booz Allen Vice President and the firm’s first Booz Allen Hamilton Fellow, Dr. Ronald Sanders supports the firm’s most strategic clients in the areas of human capital, learning, and organizational transformation. Before coming to Booz Allen, Dr. Sanders served as the US Intelligence Community’s (IC) Associate Director of National Intelligence and first chief human capital officer, where he played a key role in the establishment of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the integration of the IC. He also served as the Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) first Associate Director for Human Resource Policy, with responsibility for all civil service policies and programs for millions of federal employees and retirees. Prior to his OPM appointment, Dr. Sanders served as the first chief human resources officer for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Director of Civilian Personnel for the Department of Defense, founding Director of the Defense Civilian Personnel Service, and Deputy Director of Civilian Personnel for the Department of the Air Force.

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Focus Questions

  • What is the millennial view of security and privacy in the Digital Age?
  • Given the demographics of the IC workforce and the large portions of retirement eligible or near retirement eligible, how equipped are millenials to run the IC in 5, 10, 15 years?  What planning is being done now in terms of training, management experience and succession planning?
  • How does the disparity between IC agencies’ personnel/career policies in terms of rank in person vs. rank in position help or hinder long term planning to transition leadership and management of the IC to millenials?
2:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
PLENARY SESSION FIVE: STRENGTHENING TRUST - THE WAY AHEAD

 

Overview

History has shown that in a democracy it is possible both to have effective intelligence and to protect individual freedoms. In fact, civil liberties are the very foundation of national security. Trust, however, is the critical element of democracy, and it is clear that the public trust essential to effective intelligence has been shaken. As the Summit’s final speaker, Director Comey will provide a critical assessment of the current state of trust and confidence by U.S. citizens in their Intelligence Community. He will discuss possible ways forward to strengthen the trust and mutual respect essential to having an effective Intelligence Community on which the public and its representatives in all branches of government can comfortably rely.

 

Speaker

Mr. James Comey

Director

Federal Bureau of Investigation


Mr. James Comey
Director
Federal Bureau of Investigation

On September 4, 2013, Mr. Comey was sworn in as the seventh Director of the FBI. Prior to his appointment as Director, Mr. Comey joined the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York as an assistant U.S. attorney after graduating Law School. There he took on numerous crimes, most notably organized crime in the case of the United States v. John Gambino, et al. Afterward, Mr. Comey became an assistant U.S. attorney in the Eastern District of Virginia, where he prosecuted the high-profile case that followed the 1996 terrorist attack on the U.S. military’s Khobar Towers in Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Mr. Comey returned to New York after 9/11 to become the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York. At the end of 2003, he was tapped to be the deputy attorney general at the Department of Justice (DOJ) under then U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft. In early 2013, Comey became a Lecturer in Law, a senior research scholar, and Hertog Fellow in National Security Law at Columbia Law School.

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Focus Questions

  • How is effective intelligence today defined?
  • With respect to intelligence activities, what does transparency mean?
  • What lessons have been learned regarding how Intelligence Services must access, process and share information in today’s digital world?
  • How can the Intelligence Community create a culture of positive and collaborative engagement with the press and Congress while protecting sources, methods and its people?
3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
SUMMIT WRAP-UP

Ms. Maureen Baginski

Chair

AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Ambassador Joe DeTrani

President

Intelligence and National Security Alliance