WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

7:00 a.m. - 7:50 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

Sponsored by

7:50 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.

WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Ms. Terry Roberts

Executive Director

Interagency and Cyber

SEI Carnegie Mellon University

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

WELCOME

VADM Jack Dorsett, USN

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance (N2/N6)

Focus Questions

  • How will the Office of the CNO for Information Dominance (N2N6) achieve information dominance into the 21st Century?
  • What are the top five challenges to achieving Information Dominance?
  • How does the Information Dominance Community learn what is occurring in the private sector?

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. 

DECISION SUPERIORITY ROADMAP AND FLEET BATTLE MANAGEMENT

Navy Information Dominance will enable an end-to-end ballistic missile defense (BMD) capability fully integrated with global, regional, theater and tactical architectures.  This information capability will effectively penetrate adversary decision-making networks, enable rapid command and control, fully support interceptor and kill vehicle requirements, and provide new non-kinetic means synchronized with kinetic effects  to influence, dissuade, deter, and deny adversary ballistic missile operations.

Focus Questions

  • What does the Navy foresee as the most challenging issues in future BMD?
  • In what ways is the Navy currently engaged in addressing the means to accomplish its part of the European-based Phased Adaptive Approach mission?
  • How is Navy currently relying on C3I in BMD and how will this process be improved?

Speaker

Mr. Mark Andress, SES

Director of Knowledge Dominance of Information Dominance

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

ELECTRONIC WARFARE ROADMAP

The Navy is called to operate in a number of challenging environments.  Peer competitors are developing sophisticated threats to deny the U.S. Navy access and the ability to operate unfettered around the world.  Modernized electronic warfare (EW) with synchronized non-kinetic options and a well-trained workforce are essential to undetected arrival, maintaining freedom of maneuver, and increasing survivability for the conduct of Joint Task Force missions and operations.  OPNAV needs assistance from industry partners in helping prepare and equip maritime forces for the myriad of EW challenges posed by peer competitors, asymmetric maritime threats, and emerging adversaries and complex environments.

Focus Questions

  • How would advancements in radio frequency processing power and bandwidth technology impact EW?
  • How is EW addressing the increasing threat of sophisticated sensors and decoys?
  • What role does modeling and simulation play in EW?

Speaker

RDML Sean Filipowski, USN

Director of Cyber, Sensors, and Electronic Warfare for Information Dominance

10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK

Sponsored by

10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.  

MARITIME OPERATION CENTERS AND MDA ROADMAP

The core of the Navy Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) concept is the collection, fusion, and analysis of information and intelligence to provide naval commanders effective understanding of the tactical, operational, and strategic operating environment. Today, Navy's MDA efforts are focused predominantly on achieving decision superiority at the operational level of warfare through our Maritime Operation Centers (MOCs). Interoperable MOCs will achieve this through the use of fully integrated command and control and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems that process raw data into useful information.

Focus Questions

  • How will the MOCs interoperate to provide greater effectiveness and utility?
  • How will naval personnel be trained to fully engage the MOCs to their greatest potential and create an Information Dominant-aware operational culture?
  • What are the greatest challenges to MOC interoperability?

Speaker

Mr. Mark Andress, SES

Director of Knowledge Dominance for Information Dominance

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 

ASSURED COMMUNICATIONS ROADMAP

As the Navy operationalizes its networks into a warfighting platform, the vulnerability of cyberspace becomes increasing evident. With the current state of rapidly-developing technology, threats to satellite communication environments continue to escalate. The warfighter must have an assured ability to operate in degraded environments and quickly overcome denied environments. As naval networks and communications seek to fully integrate as a weapon under Information Dominance, they must have the ability to continually maintain a seamless flow of information in the face of mounting hostile threats.

Focus Questions

  • How will the Navy operate in a denied or degraded communications environment?
  • What is being done to gain the lead in assured communications?
  • How does the Navy take advantage of industry driven network technology advancements while minimizing operational impacts and investment costs?

Speaker

RADM Kendall Card, USN

Director of Concepts, Strategies and Integration for Information Dominance

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

LUNCH AND NETWORKING

Sponsored by

1:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: THE ROLE OF INFORMATION DOMINANCE IN THE U.S. NAVY MARITIME STRATEGY

Mr. Robert Martinage

Deputy Under Secretary of the Navy

For Plans, Policy, Oversight and Integration

1:45 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

UNMANNED CAPABILITIES ROADMAP

The U.S. Navy seeks to create a maritime architecture that delivers essential warfighting information through a continuum of networked manned and unmanned capabilities. The integration of unmanned systems across all maritime domains will utilize evolutionary capabilities to deliver information to the warfighter via tools that aid human decision-making. Anti-tamper controls and information assurance are necessary in the development of reliable and trustworthy networks. Flexible open architectures are envisioned as vital in developing both common control systems and “plug and play” payloads. OPNAV will look to industry for help with the challenges of unmanned system maritization, weaponization, energy, communication, and autonomy.

Focus Question

  • What are the current methods of achieving command and control across multiple maritime venues and how can they be improved?
  • What are the challenges facing the development timelines of Unmanned Vehicles?
  • Are there new challenges that Information Assurance experts must consider when developing technology for unmanned systems?
  • What energy solutions exist now or in the near term to propel unmanned systems into long-term missions “untethered” from frequent energy replenishment?

Speaker

RDML Matthew Klunder, USN

Director of ISR Capabilities for Information Dominance

2:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

NETWORKING BREAK

Sponsored by

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

INFORMATION DOMINANCE PANEL

During this session, the panel members will respond to questions from the audience.

Moderator

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Panelists:

RADM Kendall Card, USN

Director of Concepts, Strategies and Integration for Information Dominance

 

VADM Jack Dorsett, USN

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance

RADM William Leigher, USN

Deputy Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet

Mr. David Weddel

Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for

Information Dominance

4:15 p.m.

CONFERENCE WRAP-UP

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Ms. Terry Roberts

Executive Director

Interagency and Cyber

SEI Carnegie Mellon University