PROGRAM

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

Sponsored by

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

 

Lt Gen Bruce Wright, USAF (Ret.)

Vice President, C4ISR

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Conference Co-Chair

Brig Gen Neal T. Robinson, USAF (Ret.)

Director, Business Development

Oracle Corporation (National Security Group)

Conference Co-Chair and Member of the AFCEA Intelligence Committee

8:15 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

GLOBAL SITUATIONAL AWARENESS AND THE STATE OF USAF ISR

The Air Force continues to rapidly increase its ISR capability and capacity to support all military operations and provide global situational awareness.  The requirement to provide timely, fused, and actionable intelligence to the joint force from forward-deployed locations and distributed processing centers around the world will continue to stimulate the private sector to focus on new technologies and rapid, affordable, and fielded ISR capabilities.  The Air Force will be expected to fill this role across the spectrum of airspace environments from permissive to denied, and the range of operation types from humanitarian aid to irregular or conventional warfare and must make use of all available platforms.

 

Focus Questions

  • How will the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance respond to the growing demands for global situational awareness and precise targeting information in the 21st century?
  • What are the Air Force, Joint, and National Intelligence Communities doing to prepare for the increasing Intelligence Mission Data (IMD) requirements supporting current and future Acquisition programs?

  • What are the top five ISR challenges to supporting decision-maker requirements at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels of operations?
  • What does the ISR community need most from the private sector across the air, space and cyber realms?

Speaker

Lt Gen Larry James, USAF

Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance

Headquarters USAF, Washington, DC

 

9:00 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.

AIR FORCE DISTRIBUTED COMMON GROUND SYSTEM

Air Force Distributed Common Ground System (AF DCGS) capabilities continue to evolve to meet the challenges of tomorrow’s threats which range across the full spectrum of military operations. In this environment the AF DCGS must leverage new technologies to transition from a platform-centric to a network-centric enterprise capable of simultaneously providing data and information about the battlefield environment to analysts, decision makers, planners, and troops in combat. The future weapon system must also transition from analyst-centric to a warfighter-centric model.

 

Focus Questions

  • How can industry solutions reduce analyst workload while maintaining or improving situational awareness?
  • What can innovations in cloud computing, automated PED (including fusion and machine-to-machine processes), and on-board processing bring to the fight?
  • How will non-proprietary, open-architecture systems enhance DCGS mission flexibility?
  • What impact will the implementation of the DI2E guidelines have on current and future AF DCGS systems?
  • How will the AF DCGS weapon system transition toward a sensor agnostic, capabilities based exploitation environment capable of accepting data (Space, National, HUMINT, etc.) regardless of the source of collection?

Speaker

Maj Gen Robert Otto, USAF

Commander, Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Agency

Lackland Air Force Base, Texas

9:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK

Sponsored by

 

10:15 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

ISR AND THE CYBER FIGHT

Intelligence demands to effectively accomplish surveillance of the net, assess and identify threats, and conduct responsive full spectrum operations remain daunting.  24th Air Force will continue to advance in its capabilities to be an effective component of US CYBER COMMAND with the necessary cyber situational awareness to support worldwide combatant commander mission requirements across the spectrum of military operations including peacetime surveillance and deterrence, counterterrorism, and joint combat operations."

 

Focus Questions

  • What are near-term and future mission demands to better assess and attribute cyber threats to Air Force and joint operations?
  • Is the sustainment of effective combatant command and Service component C2 a mission focus for 24th AF and USCYBERCOMMAND?
  • What are the technology, systems capability, and training challenges for Air Force and joint cyber operations?

Speaker

Brig Gen Burke "Ed" Wilson, USAF

Director, Air Component Coordination Element

Air Forces Cyber

 

11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

ISR ACQUISITION FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW

Air Force ISR capabilities have increased dramatically since 9/11.  Much of this growth has focused on rapid fielding of airborne ISR collection systems (i.e., platforms, sensors, and associated process, exploitation, and dissemination) to meet Joint and Urgent Operational Needs (JUONs and UONs).  In addressing this ISR demand, the Air Force acquisition community increased the use of quick-reaction acquisition organizations such as BIG SAFARI, as well as created the Rapid Capabilities Office to ensure prompt system development and fielding.  As the Air Force evaluates current ISR capabilities against assigned missions and continually evolving threats (both asymmetric and near-peer), it will be increasingly important to employ a more deliberate and coordinated planning and acquisition process.  This will ensure that AF ISR capability investments are optimized for the future range of military operations, especially in a fiscally constrained environment.

Focus Questions

  • What insights regarding future Air Force ISR requirements can you present from the Air Force Acquisition perspective?
  • What is your perspective on ISR acquisition issues, such as the role of ISR developmental planning?
  • What is your view on the rapid acquisition of ISR capabilities vs. long-term ISR capabilities development?
  • What are the priority areas for Air Force S&T and R&D?
  • Where would you spend scarce research & development dollars?

Speaker

Mr. Randall Walden

Director for Information Dominance Programs

Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition

11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: AIR FORCE GLOBAL ISR

General Philip M. Breedlove, USAF

Vice Chief of Staff

12:45 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

LUNCH AND NETWORKING

Sponsored by

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

ISR RESEARCH

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio executes the Air Force's $2.2 billion Science and Technology (S&T) research program. Consisting of a global workforce of approximately 10,200 S&T professionals, AFRL personnel are assigned to nine technology directorates that include the 711th Human Performance Wing and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research as well as 40 other distributed research sites including a presence in Europe, Asia, and South America.  AFRL, the Air Force’s center for Science and Technology, is uniquely organized to integrate all technical disciplines to aggressively develop "C4ISR" S&T solutions for Global Integrated ISR (GIISR) capability gaps spanning the Air, Space, and Cyberspace domains. Since 2003, AFRL spawned multiple quick-reaction ISR capabilities, and has increased future GIISR investments in the FY13-18 budget to address future GIISR challenges created by rapidly evolving air, space, and cyberspace threats. This session will address how AFRL supports the "C4ISR Research Enterprise,” and will give a prelude of S&T technology development efforts which will assure the USAF remains dominant in the ISR arena for decades to come. 

 

Focus Questions

  • What have AFRL's Post 9-11 and CENTCOM focused QRC projects like Blue Devil, TACSAT-3, Speckles, and Sand Dragon taught the GIISR community about Future ISR technology strengths and weaknesses?
  • What does AFRL see as the major GIISR technology challenges, and how will current AFRL S&T efforts lay the groundwork for advancing AF ISR capabilities for anti-access/area denied domains?
  • How does AFRL collaborate with DoD labs, academia, and industry and align future S&T investments to address the highest priority ISR technology needs and gaps?

Speaker

Maj Gen William McCasland, USAF

Commander

Air Force Research Laboratory

Wright-Patterson AFB

 

2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

NETWORKING BREAK

Sponsored by

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

THE CURRENT AND FUTURE STATE OF AIR FORCE ISR

During this session, the panel members will respond to questions from the audience.

Moderator

Lt Gen Bruce Wright, USAF (Ret.)

Vice President, C4ISR

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Conference Chairman

Panelists

Lt Gen Larry James, USAF

Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance

Headquarters USAF, Washington, DC

Maj Gen William McCasland, USAF

Commander

Air Force Research Laboratory

Wright-Patterson AFB

 

Maj Gen Robert Otto, USAF

Commander, Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Agency

Lackland Air Force Base, Texas

 

Mr. Randall Walden

Director for Information Dominance Programs

Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition

 

Brig Gen Burke "Ed" Wilson, USAF

Director, Air Component Coordination Element

Air Forces Cyber

4:00 p.m.

CONFERENCE WRAP-UP

Lt Gen Bruce Wright, USAF (Ret.)

Vice President, C4ISR

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Conference Co-Chair

Brig Gen Neal T. Robinson, USAF (Ret.)

Director, Business Development

Oracle Corporation (National Security Group)

Conference Co-Chair and Member of the AFCEA Intelligence Committee