SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS

Mr. Judson Barnes

Director, Office of Technical Collection Affairs

Bureau of Intelligence and Research

US Department of State

Mr. Barnes is responsible for technical intelligence policy, coordination with the technical collection organizations of the intelligence community, operational liaison for sensitive, covert, and advanced collection systems, and staff support to State Department principals on programmatic, architectural, and other collection issues.   He has been engaged in intelligence collection coordination issues for almost 30 years, including acting as the primary action officer responsible for representing the Department's interests in covert and advanced collection systems.

Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland  

Dr. Nolte is the former director of education and training in the office of the Director of National Intelligence and chancellor of the National Intelligence University. He is a former Deputy Assistant Director of Central Intelligence, Central Intelligence Agency. He was Director of Training, Chief of Legislative Affairs and Senior Intelligence Advisor at the National Security Agency. He also served as Deputy National Intelligence Officer for the Near East and South Asia during the Gulf War. He has taught at several Washington area universities, is on the board of CIA's Studies in Intelligence, and directed the Intelligence Fellows Program.

Ms. Michele Weslander Quaid

Chief Technology Officer (Federal)

Innovation Evangelist
Google, Inc.

Prior to joining Google, Ms. Weslander Quaid's work experience included nearly 20 years in the national security community, to include over a decade in industry, before being asked to join the United States Government in 2002 in various transformational roles. During her time as a senior executive in the US government, she served in some “first ever” roles to include: Deputy Technical Executive for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA); Intelligence Community Deputy Chief Information Officer for the Director of National Intelligence (DNI); Chief Technology Officer for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO); and, the DNI’s senior representative to the Secretary of Defense’s Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Task Force leading information sharing and collaboration initiatives in support of coalition stability operations.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2013

7:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST & EXHIBITS

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

AFCEA WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS’ WELCOME

Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland  

 

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

INTELLIGENCE FOR THE WORLD OF 2030


Speaker

Dr. Christopher Kojm

Chairman

National Intelligence Council

The National Intelligence Council supports the Director of National Intelligence in his role as head of the Intelligence Community (IC) and is the IC’s center for long-term strategic analysis.  Since its establishment in 1979, the NIC has served as a bridge between the intelligence and policy communities, a source of deep substantive expertise on intelligence issues, and a facilitator of Intelligence Community collaboration and outreach.  The NIC’s National Intelligence Officers — drawn from government, academia, and the private sector—are the Intelligence Community’s senior experts on a range of regional and functional issues.

Overview

The National Intelligence Council is the Intelligence Community’s senior analytic component.  In addition to serving as the lead analysts in their areas of responsibility (often serving concurrently as National Intelligence Managers), The National Intelligence Officers direct the National Estimates process and the preparation of the Global Trends studies of long-term outlooks for the future intelligence environment.

 

Focus Questions 

  • What are the key factors driving the intelligence environment over the next fifteen years?
  • Which of our traditional processes and structures will continue to succeed over the long term? Which will require major revision or replacement?
  • How can industry help in a period marked both by rapid environmental change and, probably, tight budgets?

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

ADVANCED RESEARCH FOR DECISION ADVANTAGE


Speaker

Dr. Arati Prabhakar

Director

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Dr. Prabhakar has spent her career investing in world-class engineers and scientists to create new technologies and businesses.  In recent years she has served on the National Academies’ Science Technology and Economic Policy Board, the College of Engineering Advisory Board at the University of California, Berkeley, and the red team of DARPA’s Defense Sciences Research Council. In addition, she chaired the Efficiency and Renewables Advisory Committee for the U.S. Department of Energy. Dr. Prabhakar is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a Texas Tech Distinguished Engineer, and a Caltech Distinguished Alumna.

 

Overview

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is one of the truly significant public institutions of the last half century.  The research agenda of the next 50 years looks no less promising but also no less challenging.  DARPA is the agency leading the effort to prepare for the future.    

 

Focus Questions

  • Is it possible to determine which technologies, among a list of “dual edged” technologies, offer the greatest potential gains and the greatest potential risks?
  • How is the U.S. doing in developing the pipeline of a workforce capable of leading the country to a successful outcome in the merging technical environment?
  • Is the current administrative and regulatory structure contributing to or inhibiting public/private partnerships in research?

 

10:00 a.m. 10:45 a.m.

BREAK & EXHIBITS

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 noon

SESSION ONE: BRAVE OR NOT, IT WILL BE A NEW WORLD: KEY CHANGES COMING


Session Co-Chairs

Mr. Paul Kozemchak

Special Assistant to the Director

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Mr. Kozemchak is DARPA's liaison with the US Intelligence Community. He is a member of the Expert Advisory Group to the DNI's Scientific and Technical Intelligence Committee; the DNI's Intelligence Community Strategic Studies Group; and an advisor to the National Intelligence University and the Defense Science Board.  He works with the National Intelligence Council on Global Trends 2030.  He has served as a government advisor on several Defense Science Boards including: DOD 21st Century R&D Strategy; Countering Proliferation (Executive Secretary); Transnational Threats; Desert Storm Lessons Learned; and the Discriminate Use of Force. 

 

Maj Gen Robert Latiff, Ph.D, USAF (Ret.)

Director, Intelligence and Security Research Center
George Mason University

Dr. Latiff is a private consultant, providing advice on advanced technology to corporate and government clients. He is a Research Professor at George Mason University, where his interests are in weapon system acquisition and big data and advanced analytics. Dr. Latiff is also a Visiting Scholar and Adjunct Faculty Member at the University of Notre Dame where he is focused on ethics in science and technology. He is a member of the Air Force Studies Board of the National Academies. Major General Latiff served as the Director, Advanced Systems and Technology and Deputy Director for Systems Engineering at the National Reconnaissance prior to his retirement. 

 

Session Speakers

Dr. David Bray, Ph.D, MSPH

Executive Director

National Commission for the Review of the Research and

Development Programs of the U.S. Intelligence Community

Dr. Bray oversees a team of interagency assignees working with twelve Congressionally appointed bipartisan Commissioners.  He previously served as Executive for Innovation, Integration, and Interoperability, Office of the Program Manager, Information Sharing Environment.  He also deployed to Afghanistan as a Special Advisor to STRATEGIC EFFECTS for NATO's International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces Afghanistan, with the task of helping to "think differently" on critical strategic efforts.   He served as IT Chief for the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he led the technology aspects of the bioterrorism program's response to 9/11, anthrax in 2001, SARS, and other outbreaks.

Dr. Peter Highnam

Director

Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity

Dr. Highnam joined IARPA in February 2009 as the Office Director for Incisive Analysis. Prior to IARPA, he was a senior advisor in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and then in the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA). From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Highnam was a DARPA program manager with programs in electronic warfare and airborne communications. Before joining DARPA, he worked for more than a decade in applied research in industry.



Dr. William Schneider, Jr.

President

International Planning Services, Inc

Dr. Schneider was formerly Under Secretary of State for Security Assistance, Science and Technology (1982-1986).  He served as Associate Director for National Security and International Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget (1981-2) prior to being nominated as Under Secretary by the President.  In addition, Dr. Schneider serves as an advisor to the U.S. government in several capacities.  He currently serves on the Department of State's Defense Trade Advisory Group, and is a Member of its Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Advisory Board.  He previously served as Chairman of the President's General Advisory Committee on Arms Control and Disarmament from 1987 to 1993, and has served on the Defense Science Board since 2001.

Overview

Looking into the future, any scenario of relevance includes the continued development, and likely proliferation of disruptive technologies.  While the U.S. enjoys a technological lead, other countries and groups are amazingly adept at adopting new technologies, mostly, but not always, for good purposes.  The technical intelligence and technology assessment functions of the IC atrophied over a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan while the U.S. placed extraordinary efforts on counterterrorism and counterinsurgency. While the U.S. rebalances its strategic focus to include the Pacific, it also will need to strengthen and reenergize its abilities to rapidly assess foreign technology developments and to counter game-changing technical threats from others, while maintaining its long standing advantage in preventing strategic technology surprise.  A key focus of this session will be to identify where the IC and DoD maintain unassailable technological superiority, where they are in danger of losing their edge, and what they need to do to prevent others from appropriating these technologies for malevolent purposes.

 

Focus Questions

  • In addition to those highlighted in Global Trends 2030, what are the key game changing technologies with which the U.S. should be concerned, and over what time frames?
  • Where does the U.S. lead in relation to the technological capabilities of foreign entities?
  • How big a challenge is the proliferation of technologies and can the proliferation be stopped – or managed?

12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m.

LUNCH, EXHIBITS, & ENGAGEMENT THEATER
Sponsored by

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

SESSION TWO: DEALING WITH BIG DATA

Session Co-Chairs

RADM Alexander Miller, USN (Ret.)

Director

Deloitte Consulting LLP

Rear Admiral Miller joined Deloitte Consulting in July 2012. He is responsible for supporting Deloitte’s Intelligence (IC) and DOD practices. Prior to joining Deloitte, Alex held leadership positions as the Vice President and Senior Client Executive at Berico Technologies, and as a Senior Vice President and General Manager at L-3  STRATIS.   While on active duty, he served as Chief of Staff of the National Security Agency and held command positions in Misawa, Japan and Athens, Greece.  He also served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence US Pacific Command, and Space and Electronic Warfare Officer, US Sixth Fleet, and in ships, submarines, and reconnaissance aircraft operating in the Atlantic, Pacific and Mediterranean Seas and the Indian Ocean.

Mr. Lewis Shepherd

Director, Microsoft Institute

Microsoft Corporation

The Microsoft Institute for Advanced Technology in Governments (MSI) is an international arm of Microsoft pursuing strategic and technical efforts with advanced technologies to solve significant public-sector challenges, from major enterprise-wide problems of national governments, to state and local efforts in e-government, health care, and education.

Mr. Shepherd joined Microsoft in December 2007 from the Defense Intelligence Agency, where he served in the Senior Executive Service. He spent two decades working in and around Silicon Valley, but after the 9/11 attacks he focused on technologies to support the Intelligence Community and in 2003 accepted an offer to become Chief of Requirements & Research (or R2) at DIA, where he spent nearly five years helping lead a period of intelligence innovation and reform. His organization investigated, approved, and architected all new hardware/software systems and acquisitions for the Global Defense Intelligence IT Enterprise.

 

Session Speakers

Dr. Patrick Dowd

Chief Technology Officer and Chief Architect

National Security Agency

Dr. Dowd is the NSA lead for the IC ITE Cloud effort leveraging his deep experience in data, utility, and storage Clouds. He previously served as Deputy Director of Mission Capabilities within the Technology Directorate of the National Security Agency.  Dr. Dowd joined the Research Directorate of NSA in 1996, and is co-founder of the Laboratory for Telecommunications Science (R4).  He moved from Research to the SIGINT Directorate in 2004, where he directed projects to unify Computer Network Operations (CNO) and developed technical strategies to integrate CNO, SIGINT, and Defense.

 

Mr. Geoffrey Fowler

Director, Xperience (X)

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Mr. Fowler is responsible for enhancing the user’s experience through online, on-demand GEOINT services that provide access to content, expertise and applications.  He began his professional career in 1987 as a career trainee at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) where he served in a variety of analytic, managerial, and staff assignments. He specialized in the emerging humanitarian crisis in Bosnia and ultimately became the chief of the analytic team working the issue. In 1995 he established and led the Humanitarian Security Issues Team, a unit devoted to assessing humanitarian emergencies around the globe.  In 1998 Mr. Fowler served as CIA’s Liaison to Congress. In 2002 he was assigned to the White House’s new Office of Homeland Security as the first Director of the Threat Monitoring Center. He also served as the Director for Intelligence and Threat on the Homeland Security Council (HSC).  Following this assignment, Mr. Fowler returned to CIA and was the Executive Assistant in the Office of the Director for Intelligence (DI) and DI lead for the Executive Director’s strategic planning effort. He then served as the principal architect and driving force behind the World Intelligence Review (WIRe), CIA’s premier daily intelligence publication.

Mr. Kevin Magee

Deputy Chief Technology Officer

Central Intelligence Agency

The office of the Chief Technology Officer  is responsible for setting the strategic technology direction to enable CIA’s missions.  They have been entrusted by ODNI with spearheading the creation of the IC’s Commercial Cloud Services infrastructure

 

Hays "Skip" McCormick

Data Scientist

Central Intelligence Agency

Mr. McCormick is one of the leading Data Science practitioners in the U.S. Intelligence Community, and over the past decade has pioneered analytic and mission use of Big Data in counter-terrorism and other domains at the Central Intelligence Agency, which he joined after working on large-scale IC systems as part of MITRE’s Senior Technical Staff. He is a U.S. Naval Academy graduate and has lectured at George Mason University on “Leadership in Big Data Intelligence.”

 

ADM John Poindexter

Private Consultant

Dr. John Poindexter served as National Security Advisor for President Reagan and more recently as Director of the Information Awareness Office (IAO) at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), where he developed and demonstrated groundbreaking Big Data information technologies and systems to counter asymmetric threats by achieving total information awareness useful for preemption, national security warning and national security decision-making. He continues to serve on corporate boards for innovative technology firms. Dr. Poindexter served 29 years active duty in the U.S. Navy, rising to the rank of Vice Admiral

Overview

Earlier this year the Central Intelligence Agency’s Chief Technology Officer noted in a public speech that most current approaches and tools for Big Data are being built only for the speed of Map/Reduce, a programming model for processing large data sets, and the scale of human or social-media content.  He stated, "We're at high noon in the information age... The sensor world is unbounded, promiscuous, indiscriminate, and when we go to the Internet of Things, everything becomes connected, and the volume of this just explodes. So what humans are able to do in response pales in comparison to what is going to emerge in the sensor-connected world. That's the Really Big Data Challenge of the future."  As a result, while the current impact of the Big Data phenomenon on the IC is well understood; the future scale and impact of Big Data is intimidatingly unknown. Even more daunting is that the IC does not currently have a well understood path to technologies and analytic methodologies to handle the "more is always better" ambition of intelligence.

 

Focus Questions

  • What are the scientific and mathematic challenges facing the IC’s Big Data ambitions, and what are the most viable options for the IC to tackle the Big Data problem?
  • As currently organized and funded, is the IC actually capable of building the kind of peta-scale in-memory architectures required to enable complex distributed analytics for multi-INT and all-source analysis? Should industry take a leading or a partnering role in that type of project?
  • Some say it is unrealistic for the IC to attempt to match and surpass the data-collection strategies and holdings of all the world's commercial Big Data platforms. Is it, and if so are there alternative paths to exploiting that data?

3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS

3:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

PRESENTATION OF THE 2013 CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED INTELLIGENCE SERVICE


Ms. Maureen Baginski

Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee

3:45 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

THE CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD RECIPIENT ADDRESS


Mr. David Shedd

Deputy Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

Mr. David Shedd was named Deputy Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency in August 2010. In this capacity, he assists the Director’s management of a workforce of more than 16,500 military and civilian employees worldwide and his leadership of the Defense Intelligence Enterprise—Defense Intelligence Community organizations within the Department of Defense with an intelligence mission and/or function, plus all their stakeholders involved in creating, sustaining and enhancing mission capacity.

 

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

NETWORKING RECEPTION
Sponsored by

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST & EXHIBITS

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ANNOUNCEMENTS


Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

 

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

WELCOME

Ms. Michele Weslander Quaid

Chief Technology Officer (Federal)

Innovation Evangelist
Google, Inc.

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

LESSONS FROM IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN

Speaker

General Stanley McChrystal, USA (Ret.)

Co-Founder
The McChrystal Group

From his time as a commanding general, General McChrystal revolutionized key leadership principles such as transparency and inclusion; leveraging the power of teams through shared ownership; and sharing a clear vision for winning with an extended team. He also serves as a senior fellow at Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, and is an advisor or board member to several companies and non-profits, to include the White House’s Joining Forces Initiative.

Overview 

As the U.S. concludes two long and difficult military engagements, the military services must deal with rapidly evolving, challenging operational environments.  And they must do so, for the foreseeable future on tight budgets.  Defining the strategies to deal with these concurrent circumstances will represent major tests of Congress, executive leadership, and the services.

 

Focus Questions

  • What are the key lessons from Iraq and Afghanistan that can support changes in defense over the next decade?
  • What should be the key considerations in deciding on appropriate tradeoffs between ISR capabilities and conventional kinetic capabilities?
  • What role should the IC play in the U.S. defense strategy evolves – a leadership role or a supporting role?

9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

SESSION THREE: RELEVANCY OF INTELLIGENCE IN THE INFORMATION AGE

Session Co-Chairs

Mr. Charles Allen

Principal Chertoff Group

The Chertoff Group, a global security advisory firm that provides consulting, business development and merger and acquisition (M&A) advisory services for clients in the security, defense and government services industries. Mr. Allen was the Under Secretary for Intelligence Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security from 2007 to 2009.  He worked at the CIA for over forty years, and became the Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Collection in 1998. He also served as CIA’s National Intelligence Officer for Warning, Director of the National Warning Staff, National Intelligence Officer for Counterterrorism, Deputy Chief for Intelligence of CIA’s Counterterrorism Center and the Director of the DCI Hostage Location Task Force from 1985 to 1987.

CAPT Rick Myllenbeck, USN

Chief, Intelligence Strategy & Integration

Office of the Under Secretary of Defense/OUSD-I

CAPT Myllenbeck, USN, APR; is in his 37th year of service with the U.S. Navy and Navy Reserve (Information Dominance Corps), and is a veteran of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.  He has more than 25 years of experience in the Silicon Valley, having directed marketing, public relations and executive communications programs for Apple, Novell, Creative Labs, Sybase and IBM.

 

Session Speakers

Mr. Gilman Louie

Partner

Alsop Louie Partners

Mr. Louie co-founded Alsop Louie Partners.  He previously served as the Chief Creative Officer of Online Division at Hasbro Inc. and was an Investment Partner at NewSchools Venture Fund.  He also was the Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer of In-Q-Tel, where he focused on identifying and delivering exciting new technologies for the CIA and the Intelligence Community.

Ms. Carmen Medina

Specialist Leader

Deloitte Consulting LLP

Ms. Medina joined Deloitte Consulting LLP after retiring from an almost 32 years-career at the Central Intelligence Agency. Since joining Deloitte, she has continued to support the Intelligence Community on issues such as social networking and future trends, and is also working closely with Deloitte’s Center for Federal Innovation. Her areas of interest include developing rigor in analytics, navigating the emergence of new global norms in the 21st century, developing the transparent and collaborative future culture of work, and supporting diversity.  Her last assignment at CIA was as Director of the Center for the Study of Intelligence (CSI) from January 2007-December 2009.

Mr. Len Moodispaw

President and CEO

KEYW Corp.

Mr. Moodispaw has served as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), President & Chairman of the board of directors of KEYW since it began operations on August 4, 2008. Prior to the founding of KEYW, Mr. Moodispaw was President and Chief Executive Officer for Essex Corporation, or Essex, from 2000 until January 2007, and Chairman of the board of directors of Essex from 2005 to January 2007. Essex provided advanced signal, image, information processing, information assurance and cybersecurity solutions, primarily for U.S. Government intelligence and defense customers, as well as for commercial customers.

 

Dr. Jennifer Sims

Senior Fellow

Chicago Council on Global Affairs

Dr. Sims, formerly visiting professor and director of intelligence studies at Georgetown University, joined The Chicago Council on Global Affairs full time in 2012 as its senior fellow on national intelligence. A longstanding advisor to the ODNI, she currently serves as a member of the DNI's senior advisory group.  Dr. Sims previously served as deputy assistant secretary of state for intelligence coordination, receiving the Intelligence Community's Distinguished Service Medal for developing and implementing the concept of Support to Diplomatic Operations (SDO). Later she served as the senior intelligence advisor to the under secretary for management and as department-wide coordinator for intelligence resources and planning at the U.S. Department of State.  Author of numerous publications on intelligence, she is currently writing a book that develops her theory of Decision Advantage by examining case studies of intelligence in international politics from the 16th Century to the present.

 

Overview

The IC is challenged to remain relevant in the global world of information that is moving at petabyte scale and at wire speed.  Traditional intelligence will remain vital but increasingly U.S. decision-makers, accustomed to performing their own analysis through technical media, will expect the IC to bring together all forms of data and information, including the broad range of social and new media, to provide assessments and warning of threats to U.S. national interests globally.  It is far from clear, however, whether the IC fully understands this paradigm shift and is changing with sufficient speed to accommodate the new information world.  What is becoming clearer, however, is that the IC will become ineffective unless it assimilates new and dynamic information technologies, capabilities, processes, and finds new means of conveying this knowledge to policy makers.  In this non-traditional era, it also is clear that the U.S. needs to ensure that laws and practices keep pace with technological change and intelligence activities if the privacy and civil liberties of U.S. citizens are to be protected and a "surveillance society" avoided. 

 

Focus Questions

  • What changes in the IC's current structure, leadership, and strategic planning are needed to meet the expectations of decision makers of the future when it comes to incorporating non-traditional information (aka “OSINT” or "omni-source" or "omin-int")?
  • How can the IC bring together social media  information and data with the traditional forms of intelligence collection and analysis to ensure that it is effective in providing strategic assessment and warning where much of the information may come from totally non-nation states sources?
  • Where and how can the IC initiate the rethinking of the business of intelligence and effective utilization and deployment of all resources, to include intelligence analysis to prepare it for the dynamic environment that is already unfolding?  In other words, how does the IC develop intelligence expertise for the 21st Century?

10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

BREAK & EXHIBITS


11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

REBALANCING INTELLIGENCE

Speaker

Dr. J.D. Crouch II

Chief Executive Officer

QinetiQ North America

Prior to this appointment in April 2013, Dr. Crouch served as President of QinetiQ North America’s Technology Solutions Group and as the Executive Vice President for Strategic Development at QinetiQ North America’s regional headquarters.  Until July 2007, he served as Assistant to the President of the United States and as Deputy National Security Advisor.  Dr. Crouch was a senior advisor to the President on national security matters, chaired the sub-cabinet Deputies Committee, and was second in command at the National Security Council.  He served as U.S. Ambassador to Romania from 2004 to 2005.

Overview

As the US Intelligence Community shifts from twelve years of providing timely tactical intelligence to warfighters in Iraq and Afghanistan to a more strategic global focus, US policymakers will require more strategic assessments and warning intelligence in order to make informed decisions in a complex world.  The Administration in its National Security Strategy has spoken of “a rebalance” of resources, including intelligence, to meet broader and longer-range threats to US national security.  In this changed environment, new and rapidly evolving streams of information and knowledge are inundating the policy level in addition to traditional classified intelligence.  While it is acknowledged that secret intelligence will always be a critical element in decision making, the policymakers of the future will likely turn to the new streams of open source information as they develop national security strategies and deal with difficult threats and policy decisions in the future. 

Focus Questions

  • The challenges of rebalancing US national security resources -- including intelligence with a focus on tactical decision masking,--  seems almost insurmountable given the successive crises in the Middle East and South Asia.  What must be done at the policy level to ensure that national resources, including intelligence, are realigned?
  • How can the policy level engage with the IC better to understand the relative roles of open source and traditional intelligence in meeting policymaker requirements?
  • Given the insatiable demand for information and the pervasive intelligence collection capabilities of the IC, what is the policy maker’s responsibility to ensure that America does not become “a surveillance society?”  What more can an Administration, working with the legislative and judicial branches of government, do to protect privacy and civil liberty rights?

11:45 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

LUNCH, EXHIBITS & ENGAGEMENT THEATER
Sponsored by

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

SESSION FOUR: PUBLIC–PRIVATE RELATIONSHIPS FOR THE NEW INTELLIGENCE ENVIRONMENT 

Session Co-Chairs

Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland  

Ms. Michele Weslander Quaid
Chief Technology Officer (Federal)

Innovation Evangelist
Google, Inc.

  

Session Speakers
Dr. Ruth David, PhD

President & Chief Executive Officer

Analytic Services Inc.

In October 1998, Dr. David was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of Analytic Services, Inc, and in 1999, she initiated the corporation’s Homeland Defense Strategic Thrust to address the growing national concern of multidimensional, asymmetric threats from rogue nations, substate terrorist groups, and domestic terrorism; formally creating the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security in May 2001 to enhance public awareness and contribute to the dialogue on national, state, and local level. In 2004, the corporation was selected by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to establish the legislatively-mandated Homeland Security Institute, later renamed the Homeland Security Studies & Analysis Institute (HSSAI).

The Honorable Jacques Gansler

Professor and Roger C. Lipitz Chair in Public Policy and Private Enterprise

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland

 In January of 2001, Professor Gansler joined the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Public Affairs, where he holds the Roger C. Lipitz Chair in Public Policy and Private Enterprise. He teaches graduate school courses, and leads the School's Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise, which fosters collaboration among the public, private and non-profit sectors in order to promote mutually beneficial public and private interests. Previously, Dr. Gansler served as the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics from November 1997 until January 2001. In this position, he was responsible for all matters relating to Department of Defense acquisition, research and development, logistics, acquisition reform, advanced technology, international programs, environmental security, nuclear, chemical, and biological programs, and the defense technology and industrial base.

Dr. Eric Rasmussen MD, MDM, FACP

Managing Director

Infinitum Humanitarian Systems

In addition to managing Infinitum Humanitarian Systems (IHS) in the USA, Dr. Rasmussen is also Managing Director of Escudo de Proteccion al Ambiente (EPA) in Mexico. Both IHS and EPA are private sector social businesses on a "profit for purpose" model. He is also appointed Research Professor in Environmental Security and Global Medicine at San Diego State University, and is an instructor in disaster medicine for the EU's Disaster Academy in Bonn, Germany, and the Institute for Disaster Preparedness in Beijing, China. Eric previously spent 25 years on active duty with the US Navy before retiring to accept Google's offer to serve as the founding CEO of their TED Prize NGO called InSTEDD. After three years as CEO, he retired to the InSTEDD Board. He has spent most of 20 years pursuing improved civil-military collaboration, particularly in pre- and post-conflict environments.

Dr. Dave Warner, MD, PhD

Chief Information Officer

MindTel

Dr. Warner is a medical neuroscientist, arch synergist, and leader of the synergy strike force. His extensive experience includes supporting cross-domain information sharing and open communications capabilities in very difficult settings such as refugee camps, disaster areas, and post conflict stability operations. For the past decade, Dr. Warner has been directing an ongoing operational experimentation effort in eastern Afghanistan focused on demonstrating that incentivized information sharing is vital to complex operations.

 

Overview

The private sector has always played a crucial role in the American national security successes.  In the dynamic, complex, and volatile environment of the next 15-20 years, both government and the private sector (including corporate and academic institutions) must build stronger collaborative relationships in order to better adapt to the emerging environments to enable agility and continued mission success.  This panel will discuss both continuing and emerging challenges in the public-private partnership, to include technical, procedural, and cultural issues that must be addressed.

 

Focus Questions 

  • How can the IC utilize the capabilities in the private sector to increase its capabilities and improve its agility?
  • What current procedures and policies inhibit healthy public-private relationships over and how can they be addressed?
  • How best can the public and private sectors work together to confront these problems and address their potential impact to our national security?

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

APPLYING TECHNOLOGY FOR DECISION ADVANTAGE

Speaker

Dr. Linton Wells, III

Director, Center for Technology and National Security Policy

National Defense University

Dr. Wells is also a Distinguished Research Professor and serves as the Transformation Chair. Prior to coming to NDU he served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) from 1991 to 2007, serving last as the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Networks and Information Integration). In addition, he served as the Acting Assistant Secretary and DoD Chief Information Officer for nearly two years. His other OSD positions included Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence-C3I) and Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Policy Support) in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Policy).

Overview 

The information revolution continues. One authority has noted that the most important event of recent decades has been the playing out of Moore’s Law.  The likelihood that this will continue for some time represents real challenges to all of AFCEA’s constituencies, the armed services, industry, and the intelligence services.

Focus Questions

  • What must the intelligence and defense communities do, in this period of budget austerity, to avoid the mistakes of the 1990s?
  • What is the future of defense education (and intelligence education) and training in a period in which training is usually considered one of the first areas to feel spending cuts?
  • How can industry help achieve an outcome to the current austerity that actually enhances efficiency and effectiveness in defense and intelligence?

3:30 p.m.

SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP 

Mr. Judson Barnes

Director, Office of Technical Collection Affairs

Bureau of Intelligence and Research

US Department of State