Program

AFCEA GLOBAL INTELLIGENCE FORUM (BRUSSELS)

September 20-21, 2012

Le Plaza Hotel

Brussels, Belgium

FORUM OVERVIEW

The years since 9/11 have been a sobering, exciting and highly demanding period for nations and societies around the world.  Governments, industry and the public have been called upon to combat multiple threats, both traditional and non-traditional, in diverse theatres; to learn innovative ways of doing business; to rethink and adapt to new ways of thinking about sharing vs. security; and to conduct relationships with entirely new partners.  This has had a significant effect on all Intelligence Services (and the industry that supports them), including how they think of, and use, intelligence, and the changing nature of the tools needed to deal with the varying role of intelligence.  Indeed, one of the main takeaways of the last decade is the critical importance of incorporating lessons learned and combining that with the ability to adapt and transform quickly, often in real time. 

 

As the first-of-its-kind unclassified event sponsored by AFCEA Intelligence outside the U.S., this two-day forum offers intelligence and national security professionals, from both the private and public sectors, an opportunity to explore both the lessons we have learned and those we have not; and to do this across a gamut of intelligence-related issues including: terrorism; cyber; support to joint operations; adopting and adapting new technologies, including new collection platforms and social media.

THURSDAY, 20 SEPTEMBER 2012

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.   

Registration

DAY ONE THEME

THE CHALLENGES FACING INTELLIGENCE SERVICES TODAY

DAY ONE OVERVIEW

Few Intelligence Services (or governments, much less industry or the public) were prepared for the events of 9/11 and what followed.   Since then we have witnessed both a dramatic change in requirements and a shift in priorities for Intelligence Services that, consequently have led to major changes in the way intelligence is perceived and used. This, in turn, has an effect on how governments and industry work together to keep the public secure without sacrificing basic human rights. Going forward, it is important to understand the lessons that have resulted, and whether they have all been learned.  Day One focuses on the broader, more over-arching issues that Intelligence Services and the industry that supports them now face.  A key point is that these issues include opportunities as well as threats, actions as well as reactions.  The first day of the conference will establish a baseline for governments, industry, and the public of where we are, the identification of the root causes of the situations we face, some sense of where we need to go, and the inhibitors to getting there.

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.   

AFCEA WELCOME AND ADMINISTRATIVE REMARKS

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

United States

 

8:45 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.      

DAY ONE WELCOME AND KEYNOTE INTRODUCTION

Dr. Mark M. Lowenthal

President and CEO

The Intelligence & Security Academy

United States

Dr. Lowenthal served in the U.S. Intelligence Community as a Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence; staff director of the House Intelligence Committee, 104th Congress; and Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis & Production.  He is the author of the standard college textbook on intelligence:  “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy.”

 

9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

FEATURED SPEAKER

INTELLIGENCE LESSONS LEARNED SINCE 9/11

 

The Right Honourable Lord (George) Robertson of Port Ellen KT GCMG Hon FRSE, PC

United Kingdom

Former Secretary General of NATO (1999-2003) and UK Secretary of State for Defence (1997-1999)

Overview

Intelligence has always been a critical element of national and alliance security. Yet the events of 9/11 came for most as a strategic as well as a tactical surprise, leaving many lessons about national preparedness to be learnt anew.  In the years that followed, the NATO Alliance, and its member and partner nations, have had to adapt quickly to new threats and new missions in diverse theatres, and exploit the many possibilities of new information technology to support the military and law enforcement.  Huge changes have taken place in the way information is available and handled in this interconnected world - given the global threat of terrorism no longer is it possible to continue with traditional ways of thinking of intelligence in separate overseas or domestic terms.  Allied military and intelligence services and their industry partners have therefore been called upon to learn new ways of doing business together; to rethink and adapt to new ways of thinking about sharing vs. security; and to conduct liaison relationships with entirely new partners.  This has had a significant effect on the Intelligence Services of all concerned, and on how the public thinks of the gathering and use of intelligence.  Indeed, one of the main takeaways of the last decade is the critical importance of public confidence that lessons are being learned and applied by government institutions that have the ability to adapt and transform quickly, often in real time.

 

No one is better able to set the stage for this conference than our keynote speaker, who, first as the U.K. Minister of Defence and then as Secretary General of NATO and Chairman of the North Atlantic Council, was in a key leadership position as the critical events unfolded. Drawing on his experience during those critical early years as well as his work since, Lord Robertson will provide the overall context for the conference program by identifying some of the major lessons we should have learned that need to be understood and addressed by societies, governments and industry everywhere.

Focus Questions

  • How have the operating context and demands on Intelligence Services changed?
  • What have been some of the key tipping points in this change?  Are we prepared to deal with “Black Swans” in the future?How does global, regional and national economic security affect Intelligence Services?
  • Has there been a convergence, or divergence, of interests among governments, industry and the general public?

 

9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.  

NETWORKING BREAK (Exhibit Area)

Sponsored by

   
 

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

SESSION ONE: UNDERSTANDING THE NEW MISSIONS OF INTELLIGENCE

In the aftermath of the Cold War, much was written and said about the need to shift, or broaden, the intelligence focus to transnational and non-state actors.  Although these issues clearly have grown in importance, state-based issues -- e.g., Iran, North Korea, China, or the Middle East – nonetheless remain crucial.  In other words, one agenda has not replaced the other – the total agenda has become longer and more complex.  The two target sets offer different requirements and challenges.  Speakers in this session will provide a framework to understand and discuss the tensions involved in balancing these oft-competing requirements, and the implications for governments and industry that support them.

 

Focus Questions

  • What are the key challenges posed to national Intelligence Services by the state and non-state threats?
  • How well are we doing at responding to both?
  • What is needed from industry to help address the threats?
  • What are the key inhibitors to success?

Session Chair

Major General Klaus-Peter Treche, (Ret.)

General Manager AFCEA Europe

Germany

Maj. Gen. Treche, GEAF (Ret.), currently the General Manager of AFCEA Europe, is a graduate of Aachen University in Germany. He has held top leadership roles under a variety of commands throughout his career. During the last 10 years, he served as Deputy Director, integrated reform management, Federal Ministry of Defence; Director, business development and projects development, acquisition and operation company, and Deputy Commander, Joint Support Command.

Speakers

Lieutenant General Chavdar Chervenkov, (Ret.) (Bulgarian Armed Forces)

Director

European Program

Center for the Study of Democracy

Bulgaria

(Presentation in Bulgarian with translation by Mr. Konstantin Zografov)

Gen Chervenkov is a career military officer.  He was Deputy Chief of the Bulgarian General Staff and headed the Intelligence Directorate.  For a six-year period he served as the Bulgarian Ambassador to Tunisia.  He also held the position of Minister of the Interior in the then caretaker government and was the Chief of the Political Cabinet of the Minister of Defence.

RADM Edward Deets, USN (Ret.)

Deputy Director, Defense Cyber Solutions

Software Engineering Institute

Carnegie Mellon

United States

Admiral Deets manages the development and execution of CERT activities related principally to national defense. He joins the SEI after retiring from more than 30 years in the Navy. Most recently, he was Commander of Naval Network Warfare Command, where he oversaw the conduct of Navy network, communications, space, signals intelligence and cyber operations.

Sir Kevin Tebbit

Chairman of Finmeccanica UK

United Kingdom

Sir Kevin was Permanent Secretary at the UK Ministry of Defence , and previously the Director of the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the UK’s signals intelligence agency. He spent the middle part of his career in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), including as Deputy Secretary for Defence and Intelligence, as Under Secretary in charge of FCO resources, and as Head of the FCO’s Economic Relations Department.

11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

NETWORKING LUNCH (Exhibit Area)

 

1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.   

SESSION TWO: INTELLIGENCE AND IT IN A DIGITAL WORLD

We live in an increasingly digital world, and whilst information is the lifeblood of intelligence, Information Technology (IT) has become a two-edged sword.  IT facilitates the management of large data streams and the sharing of information, but it also complicates these same activities and raises concerns about the right information going to the right people (sharing vs. security). This is a challenge that industry has been working with governments and Intelligence Services for some time, but the task becomes more serious with each passing year.  The increasing role of social media adds another layer of complexity; just witness the events since the beginning of 2011, especially throughout North Africa and the Middle East. Governments, industry and the public are increasingly vulnerable to state, or non-state, attack. Cyber stands at the juncture of these trends and represents an entirely new threat environment, as well as a collection and operational opportunity.  This panel’s speakers will frame the broad lessons learned regarding information opportunities and challenges that define the new world in which Intelligence Services must operate.

 

Focus Questions

  • What lessons have we learned regarding how Intelligence Services must access, process and share information in today’s digital world?
  • What is the role of intelligence in the cyber domain?
  • Given the explosion of sources of information, how can analysts keep up?
  • How are Intelligence Services to address the increasing role of social media?  
  • What can, and should, we expect of industry?

Session Chair

Sir David Omand

Visiting Professor

Department of War Studies, King's College, London

United Kingdom

Sir David was Security and Intelligence Coordinator for Prime Minister Tony Blair and was previously Director of the Government Communications Headquarters and Permanent Secretary of the Home Office.

 

Speakers

Dr. Rumen Gyurov

Chief ExpertState Commission on Information SecurityBulgarian National Security Authority (NSA) Bulgaria

Dr. Gyurov is representing Mrs.Tsveta Markova, the Chairperson of the State Commission on Information Security. This is the government authority which conducts the classified information protection policy of the Republic of Bulgaria. The Commission works in close collaboration with the authorities of the Ministry of Defence, Ministry of Interior, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and with the security and public order services. It advises the Prime Minister of any unauthorized access to Top Secret information. In his intelligence career, Dr. Gyurov has been Chief of both the Counterintelligence and Intelligence Analysis and Current Intelligence and Early Warning Divisions. Before joining the Intelligence Service, he was an editor, journalist, reporter and anchorman for Bulgarian National Television (BNT).

Mr. James Quinault

Director of UK Cybersecurity & Information Assurance

Cabinet Office

United Kingdom

Following roles in the Treasury on environment issues, 'green' taxes and public expenditure planning and control, Mr. Quinault has worked in a number of other departments in Whitehall, including assignments in the Economic and Domestic Secretariat in the Cabinet Office; as private secretary to the Head of the Civil Service; and on secondment to the Home Office working on the overhaul of policy on criminal justice and immigration issues. His most recent post was as head of the Treasury team looking after defence and security spending.  He was appointed CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2011.

Mr. Volker Wagner

Head of Group Business Security

German Telekom, T Systems

Germany

As the German Telekom Chief Security Officer, Mr. Wagner deals internationally with the group’s security and Business Continuity Management and is responsible for business security in over 50 countries.  He also is the chairman of the German Association for Security in Industry and Commerce and a board member of the Association for Security in Industry and Commerce in North Rhine-Westphalia and the Committee for Security of the Federation of German Industry.

 

2:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.   

NETWORKING BREAK (Exhibit Area)

 

2:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.    

SESSION THREE: STRENGTHENING AN INTERNATIONAL APPROACH TO INTELLIGENCE

 

There are longstanding precedents for bilateral and multilateral intelligence sharing and cooperation both within NATO, separately among its members, and even with others not in a formal alliance such as the cooperation in Libya.  The reality since 9/11 has led to new forms of cooperation with new partners.  However, each country has different legal and political realities that can complicate matters. There is also the reality of the European Union superimposed upon the political and legal systems of its members and whether that helps or complicates intelligence activities/cooperation.  Intelligence Services tend to approach this new landscape from a national framework that often imposes constraints not necessarily applicable to others.  Where there used to be clear distinctions between the military, law enforcement, and intelligence, there now are blurred lines, including the new domain of ‘homeland security” that overlaps traditional military/intelligence/law enforcement distinctions.  This session will identify the sometimes critical differences that national and regional legal and political realities can have on Intelligence Services and the lessons learned that may improve both national and collective effectiveness.

 

Focus Questions

  • What are the key lessons that we have learned about impediments to Intelligence Services based on national and regional legal and political constraints?
  • What are the realities facing industry both within the EU and between the EU and the US, that support or inhibit a way forward?
  • Given these differences, is there a way for Intelligence Services to have the capability and agility to deal with the ever-changing nature of the threat?

Session Chair

Dr. Mark Lowenthal

President and CEO

The Intelligence & Security Academy

United States

Dr. Lowenthal served in the U.S. Intelligence Community as a Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence; staff director of the House Intelligence Committee, 104th Congress; and Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis & Production.  He is the author of the standard college textbook on intelligence:  Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy.

Speakers

Mr. Robert G. Bell

Secretary of Defense

Representative, Europe, and Defense Advisor to USNATO

United States Missions to North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NATO

Mr. Bell is the Senior Civilian Representative of the Secretary of Defense in Europe (SECDEFREPEUR) and the Defense Advisor (DEFAD) to the U.S. Ambassador to NATO.  As SECDEFREPEUR, Mr. Bell is responsible for planning, recommending, coordinating, and monitoring Department of Defense (DoD) policies, programs, and initiatives throughout Europe.  As the U.S. Mission to NATO DEFAD, he is responsible for the formulation, coordination, and presentation of DoD policies to the U.S. Ambassador to NATO.  Before assuming his current position, Mr. Bell was the Senior Vice President of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). 

Lt. Gen. P.J.M. (Jo) Godderij, NDLAF (ret)  

Vice President Government Affairs EMEA

ATOS Global Public Sector

Netherlands

At Atos, a leading international IT services company, General Godderij draws on his unique background to foster government-industry collaboration and bring the capabilities of the private sector to governments seeking a ‘new’ extended (vice ‘go-it-alone’) defense and security approach based on agility and collaboration. Prior to joining Atos, General Godderij, a fighter pilot, served as Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Netherlands Air Force (1999-2001), Vice Chief of the Defence Staff (2001-04), Permanent Netherlands Military Representative to the Military Committees of NATO and the EU (2004-07) and Director International Military Staff of NATO (2007-10).

Mr. Gilles de Kerchove

European Union Counter-Terrorism Coordinator

European Union Council Secretariat

Belgium

Mr. de Kerchove coordinates the work of the Council of the European Union (EU) in the field of counter-terrorism, maintains an overview of all the instruments at the Union's disposal, closely monitors the implementation of the EU counter-terrorism strategy, fostering better communication between the EU and third countries and ensures that the Union plays an active role in the fight against terrorism.  Previously  Mr. de Kerchove held positions as the Director for Justice and Home Affairs at the EU Council Secretariat and as Deputy Secretary of the Convention which drafted the Charter of the fundamental rights of the European Union.

Mr. Ilkka Salmi

Director European Union Intelligence Analysis Centre (EU INTCEN)

Finland

The EU Intelligence Analysis Centre, which is today part of the new European External Action Service which deals with European foreign and security policy, began operations in 2001 with William Shapcott as its first Director. Mr. Salmi was recruited 2011 as the second Director of EU INTCEN from his position as Director of the Finnish Security Intelligence Service, a post he held from 2007. The EU INTCEN is the hub of the European intelligence community and a unique intelligence gateway to EU leadership and institutions. It monitors the international security situation and assesses terrorist threats to the EU. It also has close connections with national security authorities. Mr. Salmi reports directly to the top management of the European External Action Service and High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy .

AN INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE

4:00 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.

FEATURED SPEAKER

INTELLIGENCE AND THE CYBER DOMAIN

Mr. Eugene Kaspersky

CEO

Kaspersky Lab

Russia

Mr. Kaspersky is an expert in the information security field, graduated from the Institute of Cryptography, Telecommunications and Computer Science in Moscow. He began studying computer viruses in October 1989. Today his company’s database of malicious programs and disinfection modules for them includes millions of entries and is one of the most complete antivirus databases in the world. Kaspersky Lab is now one of the world’s top-four leading vendors of computer security software, and the world’s largest privately held vendor of software security products. The company has been named a "Leader" in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Endpoint Protection Platforms. 

Overview

Mr. Kaspersky will provide a context and framework for understanding the cyber domain and the unique challenges and opportunities it poses for governments, industry and the general public based on the lessons we have learned over the past decade. He will provide his view on what sort of cooperation and collaboration is required among different constituencies both within and across national boundaries. He will also provide his view on whether a new government-industry partnership can address this issue given that the driving technologies are increasingly found in the private sector.                         

 

Focus Questions

  • Will the realities of the cyber domain fundamentally change how security is provided and maintained?
  • How can we deal with the evolving nature of the threat be best dealt with in a timely manner?
  • Given that the private sector is the incubator of the technologies driving the rapid change in the cyber domain, what should be the role of industry in supporting governments to provide cyber security?
  • What is the appropriate role for Intelligence Services? 

4:35 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

INDUSTRY ROUNDTABLE

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

Roundtable Moderator

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting

United States

Mr. Rixse, a Chairman Emeritus of AFCEA’s Intelligence Committee, has over 45 years’ experience in national security matters. A former naval officer, he has also served on the National Security Council Staff; as The Special Assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense;  Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs;  Executive Secretary, CIA; and as Chairman of an Intelligence Community space policy committee.  He currently provides executive consulting services in the national security arena.

Participants

Mr. Ilias Chantzos

Senior Director, Government Affairs

Europe, Middle East & Africa, Asia Pacific and Japan

Symantec Corporation

Greece

Based in Brussels, Mr. Chantzos is frequently asked to speak to government bodies, national authorities and international organizations on public policy issues with regard to IT security and data risk management. His expertise runs the gamut from issues dealing with privacy, critical information infrastructure protection, cybersecurity, cybercrime. Prior to joining Symantec, Mr. Chantzos worked as a legal and policy officer in the Directorate General Information Society of the European Commission focusing on information security policy.

Rear Admiral Tony Cothron, USN (Ret.)

Vice President, Customer Requirements, Intelligence Solutions Division

General Dynamics Information Technology

United States

Admiral Cothron leads the team that develops customer insights that provide the focus for the development of solutions for all customers within the Intelligence Community. Prior to joining GD-IT in 2009, RADM Cothron had a distinguished 30-year career as an intelligence officer. He has served as the Director of Naval Intelligence, Executive Assistant to the Director of National Intelligence and National Security Agency Deputy Director for Customer Requirements and had multiple tours working with NATO in Europe including duty as N2 for COMSIXTHFLT and as Commander of the USEUCOM Joint Analysis Center. 

Mr. Eugene Kaspersky

CEO

Kaspersky Lab

Russia

Mr. Kaspersky is an expert in the information security field, graduated from the Institute of Cryptography, Telecommunications and Computer Science in Moscow. He began studying computer viruses in October 1989. Today his company’s database of malicious programs and disinfection modules for them includes millions of entries and is one of the most complete antivirus databases in the world. Kaspersky Lab is now one of the world’s top-four leading vendors of computer security software, and the world’s largest privately held vendor of software security products. The company has been named a "Leader" in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Endpoint Protection Platforms. 

Mr. Lewis Shepherd

Director

The Microsoft Institute for Advance Technologies in Governments

United States

Mr. Shepherd has a twenty-five-year career dealing with the role of technology in governments and business. He has been with Microsoft since 2007, where his Microsoft Institute leads international efforts to use advanced research to solve major enterprise-wide problems of national, state and local governments in areas of  national security, counterterrorism, e-government, and education. Prior to Microsoft he served from 2003-2007 as Senior Technology Officer at the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, using his Silicon Valley background to evaluate DIA and DoD intelligence needs, evaluate technology investments across the community, and manage high-impact special projects for the Director of National Intelligence on key issues of information sharing and improved analysis.

Mr. Lee Vorthman

Chief Information Security Officer

NetApp U.S. Public Sector

United States

Mr. Vorthman leads a business unit focused on developing cyber security solutions and strategic alliances for the U.S. Public Sector. His team's recent efforts have been focused on developing solutions for the high speed ingest and analysis of exabytes of unstructured data in the context of cyber security.  His industry experience includes supporting research and development, defending enterprise networks and conducting offensive cyber operations. Before entering the private sector, he served in the U.S. Navy as an Intelligence Analyst where he served in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. He is also a founding member and serves on the advisory board of both the Washington, D.C. Cyber Roundtable and Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) Roundtable.

 

Overview

Industry, as well as governments, have been subject to many of the same issues as have intelligence agencies: terrorism; cyber threats; the requirement to support joint operations; adopting and adapting new technologies, the risks vs. benefits of social media, etc. In this special Roundtable, representatives from industry will provide their perspectives on the lessons industry has learned over the past decade and what steps they have had to take to deal with the new reality. They will provide insights regarding the challenges and opportunities of being a partner with individual and collective government agencies.

 

Focus Questions

  • What does industry perceive as the new challenges and opportunities to support national security and intelligence requirements, both within the EU and between the EU and the US?
  • What should be the nature of future partnerships and cooperation between governments and  industry?
  • Is there a business case for industry to support the IT and cybersecurity needs of governments rather than focusing solely on the private sector?
  • How is industry constrained given the twin realities of the openness of the internet era and growing concerns for individual privacy and national security?

6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

NETWORKING RECEPTION (Exhibit Area)


Sponsored by

______________________________________________________________

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

 

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.     

Registration

 

DAY TWO THEME

APPLYING THE INTELLIGENCE LESSONS WE HAVE LEARNED

DAY TWO OVERVIEW

The nature of the threat is constantly changing, sometimes more rapidly than one expects. Successful intelligence, therefore, requires constant transformation, which in turn depends on recognition of the true nature of the threat, political commitment, and adequate resources.  Day One addressed the over-arching lessons learned since 9/11 regarding the significant changed nature of the challenges that Intelligence Services, and the industry that supports them, face. Day Two focuses on the most urgent transformational requirements and the possibilities of meeting these requirements in highly constrained budget environments in almost all nations. It looks at three specific areas where cooperation is critical to determine whether we can, and are, applying the lessons learned successfully: 1) support to national and coalition requirements; 2) support to non-traditional requirements; and, perhaps a more existential question, 3) can intelligence, as we’ve known it, exist in an open, connected world?

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.    

ADMINISTRATIVE REMARKS

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

United States

 

DAY TWO WELCOME

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting

United States

Mr. Rixse, a Chairman Emeritus of AFCEA’s Intelligence Committee, has over 45 years’ experience in national security matters. A former naval officer, he has also served on the National Security Council Staff; as The Special Assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense;  Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs;  Executive Secretary, CIA; and as Chairman of an Intelligence Community space policy committee.  He currently provides executive consulting services in the national security arena.

 

8:10 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

SPEAKER INTRODUCTION

Mr. Kent R. Schneider

President & CEO

AFCEA International

United States

Mr. Schneider assumed his current position as AFCEA’s president and chief executive officer on 1 August 2007. A 26-year veteran of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, he came to AFCEA from Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Information Technology sector, where he served as president of the Defense Group, president of Northrop Grumman Information Technology Global, the International arm, and vice president of business development. He also has been recognized by Federal Computer Week magazine as one of the top 100 executives with the greatest influence on the information systems community.

8:15 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

FEATURED SPEAKER 

MEETING THE NEW INTELLIGENCE CHALLENGES

 

Mr. Julio A. C. Pereira

Secretary General

Portuguese Republic Intelligence System (SIRP)

Portugal

In his capacity as Secretary-General of Sistema de Informações da República Portuguesa  (SIRP), reporting directly to the Prime Minister, Mr. Pereira leads the activities of Portugal’s Intelligence Services. This includes both SIED, which produces intelligence that may contribute to safeguard national independence, national interests and external security of the Portuguese State; and SIS, which produces the intelligence that may contribute to safeguard internal security, and pre-empt sabotage, terrorism, and espionage.

 

Overview

As the individual responsible to the Prime Minister for the Portuguese Intelligence Services, Mr. Pereira is uniquely qualified to provide insights into what, if any, changes have taken place in the way Intelligence Services are organized as a result of the transformations in the nature of foreign and domestic threats we are witnessing.  He will provide his view on what has changed, what new requirements have emerged and what remains the same with respect to cooperation and collaboration both among agencies within his country and across national boundaries. He also will address where he sees the need for industry to support the existing and emerging requirements the organizations for which he is responsible.

Focus Questions

  • How have non-traditional threats changed the nature of what a nation’s Intelligence Services must be?
  • What are the appropriate roles for Intelligence Services given the reality of the threats facing nations today?
  • What must be done to encourage intelligence collaboration among allied nations?
  • How can industry be leveraged to help meet the challenges of today and tomorrow?

9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.  

SESSION FOUR: SUPPORTING NATIONAL AND MULTINATIONAL INTELLIGENCE REQUIREMENTS

 

The years since 9/11 have seen the growth of requirements for Intelligence Services to support not only national requirements, but also new coalition requirements.  Members of NATO experienced this in the 1990s in the first Gulf War and in the Balkans.  In the last decade, we have seen the growth of both national and coalition requirements, often against a non-state threat or a non-military situation; e.g., to deal with terrorist threats within Europe, coalition operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and Libya, humanitarian relief, and economic sanctions.  Speakers in this session will explore the pressures and tensions that exist as Intelligence Services work to meet not only their dramatically changing national requirements, but also the new requirements to support activities that have become the new “normal.”  

Focus Questions

  • What is the nature of the intelligence requirements that must be considered in order to enable individual nations to act both in their own national interest as well as in cooperative activities?
  • How does, can, and should intelligence (in the broadest sense) be engaged (or integrated) into national or coalition efforts, whether military or non-military?
  • How can there be shared capabilities?
  • How can operational security and protection of sources and methods be maintained in the current operational environment?
  • Does industry play a role in a joint effort, or only in support of each national component?

Session Chair

Major General Klaus-Peter Treche, GEA (Ret.)

General Manager AFCEA Europe

Germany

Maj. Gen. Treche, GEAF (Ret.), currently the General Manager of AFCEA Europe, is a graduate of Aachen University in Germany. He has held top leadership roles under a variety of commands throughout his career. During the last 10 years, he served as Deputy Director, integrated reform management, Federal Ministry of Defence; Director, business development and projects development, acquisition and operation company, and Deputy Commander, Joint Support Command.

 

Speakers

Mr. Joel N. Maloney 

Director for Defense Intelligence, US Mission to NATO and Director of National Intelligence Liaison to NATO

United States

Mr. Maloney has served with distinction in a variety of intelligence-related assignments.  Most recently he was the Chief of Staff, Office of the Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Intelligence Integration.  Prior to that, he served as the Director, Military Operations Group, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Analysis and Production Directorate.  Mr. Maloney received a direct commission in the U.S. Naval Reserve and served as a naval reserve intelligence officer in a variety of assignments.

Brigadier General Hartmut Pauland, (Army)

Head of German Armed Forces Staff II &

Defence Intelligence Director

Germany

In a distinguished military career spanning 39 years, General Pauland served in a variety of command and staff assignments ranging from a platoon leader to chief of the Military Attaché Branch in Berlin.  He also has served as the military adviser to the Assistant Director of the SIGINT Division of the Bundesnachrichtendienst – the only foreign intelligence service of the Federal Republic of Germany and as the commanding officer of Signal Battalion 320 and also of the Command and Support Regiment 30.   

Dr. Phil Ritcheson

Director, Intelligence Division

International Military Staff

NATO

Philip Ritcheson currently serves as Director for Intelligence on the International Military Staff at NATO HQ in Brussels. In this capacity he also serves as the Director, NATO Intelligence Warning System and Chairman, Military Intelligence Committee.  Professionally, he has served on the National Security Council Staff, in the Intelligence Community, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and as a naval officer.  He has helped transform U.S. strategic and operational intelligence, provided intelligence support to forward deployed forces in Iraq, and written national policies and strategies. He was selected to serve in the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service in 2007. 

10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK (Exhibit Area)

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 noon           

SESSION FIVE: THE INCREASED ROLE OF NON-TRADITIONAL INTELLIGENCE REQUIREMENTS

 

The new reality is that there are potential threats to national (and collective) security that derive from non-traditional situations, and these are new additions to the requirements Intelligence Services must address.  The lawlessness of drug and human trafficking; economic instability and massive unemployment; drought, famine and disease; tribal warfare and ethnic cleansing; failed states; international events such as the World Cup and the Olympic Games as potential targets for terrorists; cyber threats to national infrastructures; all these, and more, have been added to the requirements that Intelligence Services must address.  This session will explore some of the key reasons why such non-traditional requirements are, or are not, legitimate functions of Intelligence Services.

 

Focus Questions

  • Does the variety of non-traditional requirements (not just non-state actors, but non-traditional activities, whether criminal or not) demand a new way of thinking?
  • Are these legitimate requirements for Intelligence Services?
  • Can countries afford to do both?
  • Is the threat such that they cannot afford not to do so?
  • Is there a role for industry?

Session Chair

Dr. Mark M. Lowenthal

President and CEO

The Intelligence & Security Academy

United States

Dr. Lowenthal served in the U.S. Intelligence Community as a Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence; staff director of the House Intelligence Committee, 104th Congress; and Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis & Production.  He is the author of the standard college textbook on intelligence:  “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy.”

Speakers

Ambassador Gábor Iklódy

Assistant Secretary General of the Emerging Security Challenges Division

NATO

Ambassador Iklódy is the NATO Secretary General’s primary advisor on emerging security challenges and their potential implications for the security of the Alliance and a member of the Secretary General’s senior management team.  The Division, which he directs and manages, aims to provide a coordinated approach by the Alliance to the challenges of the 21st Century.  These include terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction proliferation, cyber threats, as well as energy security challenges, including those posed by environmental changes. 

 

Mr. Alan Jenkinson

Science and Technology

Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism

The Home Office

United Kingdom

Mr Jenkinson currently serves as the UK Security Industry’s Representative and Liaison to Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism (OSCT) at The Home Office. In this position, he both represents approximately 2,000 companies( from SMEs to Global Corporations) and provides the UK Security Industry input and knowledge to UK HMG.  His home company is HP, where he is a Global Strategist for Information Management and Analytics, specialising in intelligence and policing. He also sits on the UK Resilience Industry Suppliers Executive Council. 

 

Mr. Jürgen Maurer

Vice President                                                          

Bundeskriminalamt (Federal Criminal Police Office)

Germany       

In over 30 years with the Bundeskriminalamt, Mr. Maurer has served in variety assignments including the section dealing with the suppression of organized crime and as a liaison officer in Washington, DC.  He is the former head of the State Security Division and the head of the division dealing with serious and organized crime.

Mr. Robert Raine CBE

Director of Olympic and Paralympic Security

Office of Security and Counter-terrorism

Home Office

United Kingdom

In 2008 Robert Raine was appointed to the role of Director of Olympic and Paralympic Security for the Home Office. He has worked closely with Ministers in several Government departments on a breadth of subject matters, including identity cards, the eradication of animal rights extremism, and on delivering improvements in the police’s ability to deal with counter terrorism and serious and organised crime.

Commander Sue Wilkinson

Head of the Olympic Intelligence Centre

Metropolitan Police Service

United Kingdom

Commander Wilkinson has held a variety of uniform, detective, policy and strategy roles across London and at New Scotland Yard.  She served in a variety of roles within the Specialist Crime Directorate before leaving for Australia in 2007 to take up a three year contract as the inaugural Executive Director of the Australia New Zealand Policing Advisory Agency.

 

12:00 noon – 1:15 p.m.

NETWORKING LUNCH (Exhibit Area)


Sponsored by

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.    

SESSION SIX: INTELLIGENCE IN TODAY’S OPEN, CONNECTED WORLD

Intelligence is, of necessity, about secrets – secrets sought and secrets kept.  At the same time, Intelligence Services exist in open democracies with free presses.  These two realities, some  argue, cannot coexist without some compromise by one, the other, or both.  We live in a world where the cyber domain is both a boon and a vulnerability.  Further, social media is here to stay, and societies are struggling to cope with the role of the press in this new digital environment. In addition, ‘hacksters’  and “leakers” have introduced a new level of complexity and challenge.  This session will explore what is, perhaps, the most fundamental challenge to the proper role and place of Intelligence Services that began to emerge in the 1990s but accelerated in the post-9/11 era:  Can Intelligence Services exist and be effective in a world where there are fewer and fewer secrets that can be kept?

Focus Questions

  • How do we reconcile the mission of Intelligence Services with the realities of today’s world?
  • How has the role of the media changed?
  • How has the Worldwide Web changed the nature of the shared playing space?
  • Are there new rules of engagement? 
  • Do we need to have some new rules?
  • Can the private sector, which has spawned this new challenge, provide solutions?

Session Chair

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting

United States

Mr. Rixse, a Chairman Emeritus of AFCEA’s Intelligence Committee, has over 45 years’ experience in national security matters. A former naval officer, he has also served on the National Security Council Staff; as The Special Assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense;  Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs;  Executive Secretary, CIA; and as Chairman of an Intelligence Community space policy committee.  He currently provides executive consulting services in the national security arena.

Speakers

Brigadier Günter Eisl

Director  Intelligence Directorate

European Union Military Staff, EEAS

Austria

Brigadier General Eisl worked in the Austrian Foreign Intelligence Service as Head of the Analysis Department and later became the Vice Director of the Service before being assigned to the EU’s European External Action Service in Brussels where he assumed his current duties.

 

Mr. John Palfreyman
Director, Defence, Intelligence & Public Safety

IBM Software Group Europe CTO Team

United Kingdom

Mr.Palfreyman took responsibility for IBM’s Defence, Intelligence & Network Centric Operations global solutions portfolio in March 2007.  He focused on the application of innovative collaborative development to solution building, the importance of open architectures & service orientation in meeting our customer needs. In July 2011, he moved to the Software Group Europe CTO Team where he leads the Defence, Intelligence and Public Safety portfolio with a particular focus on Cyber Security, Social (Media) Business, Open Architectures and Stream Computing for real time defence and intelligence applications.

Mr. Raphael Satter

Cybersecurity Writer – London

Associated Press

Mr. Satter has been with The Associated Press for more than six years, reporting from Britain, France, Ireland, and Iceland. He currently covers cybersecurity and freedom of information issues out of London - including WikiLeaks, Britain's tabloid phone hacking scandal, and the rise of Anonymous. His work has often involved scanning reams of leaked documents for leads; one recent project required a custom-built search engine to parse more than 2 million emails taken from a set of Syrian servers. His analysis of the emails stolen from the University of East Anglia was part of an award-winning series of articles recognized by the Society of Environmental Journalists in 2010.

 

Ms. Michele Weslander Quaid

Chief Technology Officer (Federal) and Innovation Evangelist

Google

USA

Prior to joining Google Ms. Weslander-Quaid had significant private and public sector work experience in the national security community, including key roles in the U.S. Intelligence Community. In her role as CTO for the Federal sector, she draws on her unique experience and works across Google's government customer base, utilizing her knowledge, experience, and expertise to help them innovate and apply modern technology solutions to transform their business processes. Google's mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and usable -- securely, and in a geospatial context. Google's tools and cloud platform enable people to work in the future, today -- any team, any time, any place, any device.

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.  

STRETCH BREAK

 

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.   

FEATURED SPEAKER

THE FUTURE FOR INTELLIGENCE

 

Sir David Omand

Visiting Professor

Department of War Studies, King's College, London

Forum Co-Chair

United Kingdom

Sir David was Security and Intelligence Coordinator for Prime Minister Tony Blair and was previously Director of the Government Communications Headquarters and Permanent Secretary of the Home Office.

 

Overview

The closing speaker will provide a critical assessment of the lessons we should have learned since 9/11,  where we are now, the identification of the root causes of the situation we face, some sense of where we need to go and the inhibitors to getting there.  He will provide his view on just what the nature and role of Intelligence Services should be in the years ahead, including any structural changes that may be required for them to provide the most effective support to national and collective security.

                           

Focus Questions

  • Given the likely future, are Intelligence Services today up to the challenge? 
  • Can we deal with the evolving nature of the threat in a timely manner, or is the nature of the threat just too agile for Intelligence Services as we know them?If so, where do we go from here?
  • What is the nature of future partnerships and cooperation among governments, industry and the public that are required?

3:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.                 

FORUM WRAP-UP