I


Program

FORUM CO-CHAIRS

Ms. Kristina Ardelyanu

Head of Threat Research & Security Intelligence PR Group

Kaspersky Lab

Ms. Ardelyanu is a corporate communications professional who began her career in journalism, working for IT and business magazines. In her current role, she develops company positioning strategy for Threat Research and drives communications for high-value outbreaks and incident response. Before assuming her current position, she served as Deputy Chief of Staff and was responsible for Kaspersky Lab’s Government Relations programs in Europe and the CEO Press Office. Previously she was the Senior Corporate Communications Manager running global public relations and working on conferences in Europe, the Middle East and North America.

Mr. Gregory Funaro

Head of Strategic Communications

Kaspersky Lab

Mr. Funaro is a strategic communications professional. He began his career with Fleishman-Hillard, a leading, global strategic communications agency.  In his current position, he is responsible for developing content and activities for both internal and external audiences that integrate Kaspersky Lab’s strategic vision with its corporate objectives, security intelligence, research expertise and technology solutions. Before assuming his current responsibilities, he was Kaspersky Lab’s Senior Manager for Threat Research PR and drove the media relations program for the company’s security experts and cyber-threat research.

 

Dr. Mark M. Lowenthal

President and CEO

The Intelligence & Security Academy

Dr. Lowenthal served in the U.S. Intelligence Community as a Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence; staff director of the House Intelligence Committee, 104th Congress; and Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis & Production.  He is the author of the standard college textbook on intelligence: “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy.”

 

Mr. Joel Maloney

Director of National Intelligence Liaison Officer to NATO and Director for Defense Intelligence, US Mission to NATO

Mr. Maloney is career intelligence professional.  He has served as a naval intelligence officer; Director, Military Operations Group, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Analysis and Production Directorate; and Chief of Staff, Office of the Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Intelligence Integration.  In his current position he is responsible for managing the defense and national intelligence portfolio for the US NATO Mission and for the development of policy, strategy, planning, programming, and requirements for the US intelligence effort at NATO.

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting

Mr. Rixse, a Chairman Emeritus of AFCEA’s Intelligence Committee, has over 45 years’ experience in national security matters. A former naval officer, he has also served on the National Security Council Staff; as The Special Assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense;  Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs;  Executive Secretary, CIA; and as Chairman of an Intelligence Community space policy committee.  He currently provides executive consulting services in the national security arena.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2013

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

DAY ONE THEME:

THE CURRENT CHALLENGES TO EUROPEAN SECURITY & THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE

DAY ONE OVERVIEW

Significant changes continue to take place in the way information is developed and handled in the interconnected digital world. The internet and new applications such as social media have introduced new sources of information and new vulnerabilities. There is a recognized need for greater integration of operational and intelligence efforts among security agencies (military, civilian intelligence, law enforcement, etc.) as a result of the growing transnational aspect of various threats. Within and across Europe, efforts are being undertaken by individuals, organizations, companies and both by individual nations and collectively within the NATO Alliance and the EU to develop capabilities to deal with the rapidly changing security environment. Day One of the conference focuses on the broader, over-arching issues that Europe and its close partners face and how intelligence and the private sector can be leveraged to meet national and collective requirements for improved security.

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

DAY ONE WELCOME AND KEYNOTE INTRODUCTION

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting

 

Mr. Joel Maloney

Director of National Intelligence Liaison Officer to NATO and Director for Defense Intelligence,

US Mission to NATO

8:45 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

THE SECURITY THREAT TO EUROPE TODAY AND WHAT WE EXPECT FROM INTELLIGENCE 

Speaker

Ambassador Maciej Popowski

Deputy Secretary General for the European External Action Service

Ambassador Popowski has enjoyed a distinguished diplomatic career since he entered into the Polish diplomatic service in 1991. Currently, he oversees those elements in the EEAS responsible for Security Policy and Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) Structures. Prior to assuming his current responsibilities with the creation of EEAS, he served in a variety of posts within the EU and EC as a member of Poland’s diplomatic service, including: Head of Cabinet of the President of the European Parliament Jerzy Buzek; Director, DG Development, European Commission; Ambassador, Representative of Poland to the Political and Security Committee of the EU; Minister Plenipotentiary, Deputy Head of the Mission to the EU; Director of the Department of the European Union, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Warsaw.

Overview

Over the past several years, both the EU and NATO have begun new intelligence initiatives in recognition of the rapidly changing nature of the threats to European security. This has been reflected in changes to security strategy policies and various implementing activities. It is important to understand what has been done, what more is planned and how the different collective entities can work together to achieve a common objective: European Security. 

We are fortunate to have as our keynote speaker someone who is responsible for dealing with these very challenges from a collective European perspective, brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in matters of European Security and can speak to the importance of good and timely intelligence.

Focus Questions

  • What is the nature of the current threat(s) to Europe’s security, what is new (and old) about the nature of the threat(s), and what are the main three/five threats?
  • Is there a convergence, or divergence, of interests among governments, industry and the general public? How are critical infrastructure and individual privacy protected?
  • What is the proper role of intelligence, does it need to provide more timely information in today’s digital era, and is intelligence being shared effectively?    

 

9:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.     

NETWORKING BREAK AND EXHIBITS           

10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

SESSION ONE: NATO INITIATIVES AND THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE

Overview

At the May 2012 Chicago Summit, NATO Heads of State and Government re-stated their commitment to the ambitious program of reforming NATO’s command structure, headquarters, and agencies.  Among new initiatives underway are: NATO’s ongoing process of intelligence transformation and development of organic alliance Joint Intelligence Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (JISR) capabilities; and its Connected Forces Initiative and Smart Defence program. A prominent component of this effort has been the reform of the Alliance’s intelligence enterprise. NATO’s headquarters intelligence functions are more robust and integrated than ever, with special emphasis on the regular production of timely and relevant so-called “non-agreed intelligence” products. This session will look at the situation from the NATO perspective and explore what more needs to be done.

Focus Questions

  • What lessons have we learned regarding intelligence requirements and sharing from operational and exercise activity and how are they being applied to the new initiatives?
  • What more do we expect industry to be able to deliver over the next few years by way of enabling more effective military intelligence to meet these requirements?
  • What are the legal and ethical impediments to sharing key intelligence information in a timely manner under Smart Defence and CFI?

Session Chair

Mr. Joel Maloney

Director of National Intelligence Liaison Officer to NATO and Director for Defense Intelligence,

US Mission to NATO

Session Speakers

Professor Philip H. J. Davies

Director

Brunel University Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS

Professor Davies is a leading British academic expert on national and defence intelligence issues. A founding member of the Brunel University Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS) in 2003, he took on its Directorship in 2008. In 2013 he led BCISS' initial delivery of a basic training package for intelligence analysts at the European Union's Intelligence Centre (INTCEN). During 2010-11 he headed a BCISS team that contributed to the production of both the latest UK Joint Intelligence Doctrine and an entirely new doctrine on understanding for operational commanders. A political sociologist specialising in the organisation and management of intelligence institutions, he has published on the Secret Intelligence Service, Government Communications Headquarters, the Joint Air Reconnaissance Intelligence Centre, Defence Intelligence, the Joint Intelligence Organisation and the US national intelligence apparatus. His most recent publications include Intelligence and Government in Britain and the United States: a Comparative Approach (Praeger, 2012),  ‘Defence Intelligence in the UK after the Mountbatten Reforms’ Public Policy and Administration  22:2 (2013) and ‘The Intelligence Cycle is Dead; Long Live the Intelligence Cycle’ in Understanding the Intelligence Cycle (Routlege, 2013).   Professor Davies is also a regular commentator on intelligence affairs for the BBC and other news media.

Mr. Patrick Heck

Chairman of NATO Civilian Intelligence Committee and Director, Service de Renseignements de l'Etat (SRE)  

Mr. Heck has had a distinguished career dealing with national and European security issues. Prior to assuming his current positions as Chairman of NATO Civilian Intelligence Committee Director of SRE Luxembourg he headed the intelligence branch of SRE. Previously he served in various posts in Luxembourg and NATO, including: Legal Advisor; Private Office of General Manager ; NAMSA/NATO; Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Representation of Luxembourg to NATO; Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Luxembourg, Directorate of Political Affairs, desk officer Asia/Oceania and EU Common Security of Defense Policy.

Dr. Phil Ritcheson

Director, Intelligence Division

International Military Staff 

NATO

Dr. Ritcheson currently serves as Director for Intelligence on the International Military Staff at NATO HQ in Brussels. In this capacity he also serves as the Director, NATO Intelligence Warning System and Chairman, Military Intelligence Committee.  Professionally, he has served on the National Security Council Staff, in the Intelligence Community, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and as a naval officer.  He has helped transform U.S. strategic and operational intelligence, provided intelligence support to forward deployed forces in Iraq, and written national policies and strategies. He was selected to serve in the Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service in 2007. 

11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.   

NETWORKING LUNCH

12:45 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

SESSION TWO: EU SECURITY INITIATIVES AND THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE

Overview

The EU has undertaken many initiatives over the past three years to improve European security. Among these new initiatives are: the EU’s new Internal Security Strategy; a Digital Agenda; and new Cybersecurity Strategy. Counter-terrorism, infrastructure protection and cyber have been particular concerns, as has been the desire to ensure that there is coherence and complementarity between the internal and external aspects of EU security policies. This session will describe the progress of these various activities from an EU perspective, discuss how they share, rather than duplicate, effort, and what more is required.

Focus Questions

  • What are the key EU intelligence initiatives and how do EC Directorates (EEAS, Home Affairs, and Digital Agenda) coordinate on these comprehensive European security matters?
  • What is the role of industry in making these initiatives work and what efforts exist to develop an EU (or EU agency)-Industry Team approach?
  • What, if any, coordination exists between the EU and NATO initiatives in areas of common concern (e.g., terrorism, cyber, etc.)?

Session Chair

Mr. Gregory Funaro

Head of Strategic Communications

Kaspersky Lab

Session Speakers

Mr. Robert Hayes

Senior Fellow

Microsoft Institute for Advanced Technology in Governments

Mr. Hayes is an acknowledged expert in strategic risk who has advised major private and public sector organisations on risk and security strategy; he is also an international authority on issues between government and industry in the internet, communications and computing sectors. In his current position he provides high level support and advice to governments on the threats and opportunities posed by emerging technologies. Prior to joining Microsoft, he worked for the UK Government in senior positions in the law enforcement, security and intelligence community; he also served as a hostage negotiator for ten years. Mr. Hayes holds a B.Sc. in Psychology, is a Fellow of the British Computer Society and a Freeman of The City of London.

Ms. Joëlle Jenny

Director for Conflict Prevention and Security Policy

European External Action Service

Ms Jenny reports directly to the EEAS Deputy Secretary General Popowski and oversees a Directorate responsible for three key EU security portfolios: weapons of mass destruction, conventional weapons, and space; conflict prevention, peace-building, an mediation instruments; and security policy and sanctions. Prior to assuming her current responsibilities in 2011, she served in a wide variety of diplomatic assignments, including: as a Swiss and a British official, covering issues of international security, conflict prevention and peace building; as a diplomat she was posted twice in New York to cover UN affairs; as Deputy Head of the Conflict, Humanitarian Affairs and Security Department at the UK’s Department for International Development. She has also worked extensively in Iraq, Yemen and the Palestinian Territories, and for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), including as Head of Office, in Angola, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Rwanda and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

Mr. Steve Purser

Head, Core Operations Department

European Network and Information Agency (ENISA)

Mr. Purser is currently responsible for all operational activities of ENISA. He is a member of the Steering Board of the CERT EU and the Programme Board of the EU Cyber Crime Centre. In the area of standards, he is the ENISA representative on the ISO SC 27 working group. Prior to joining ENISA in 2008, he occupied the role of Information Security Manager for a number of companies in the financial sector. He was a co-founder of the 'Club de Securité des Systèmes Informatiques au Luxembourg' (CLUSSIL) and is also the author of “A Practical Guide to Managing Information Security” (Artech House, 2004). 

Mr. Ilkka Salmi

Director

European Union Intelligence Analysis Centre (EU INTCEN)

EEAS

Mr. Salmi became Director of the EU Intelligence Centre (INTCEN), which was formally known as the EU SITCEN, in February 2011 from his position as Director of the Finnish Security Intelligence Service, a post he held from 2007. The EU INTCEN is the hub of the European intelligence community and a unique intelligence gateway to EU leadership and institutions. EU INTCEN's mission is to provide intelligence analyses, early warning and situational awareness to the High Representative Catherine Ashton and to the European External Action Service, to the various EU decision making bodies in the fields of the Common Security and Foreign Policy and the Common Security and Defence Policy and Counter-Terrorism, as well as to the EU Member States. EU INTCEN does this by monitoring and assessing international events 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, focusing particularly on sensitive geographical areas, terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and other global threats. Mr. Salmi reports directly to the top management of the European External Action Service and High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy.

2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.     

NETWORKING BREAK AND EXHIBITS 

2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

SESSION THREE: MEETING THE COLLABORATIVE CHALLENGE: SUCCESSES AND FAILURES OF INTELLIGENCE

Overview

A successful threat most often exploits gaps in any defense rather than using a frontal assault. The EU, in its 2008 Security Strategy update, noted that “…The EU and NATO must deepen their strategic partnership for better co-operation in crisis management….” It is clear that the importance of transparency and collaboration are recognized as being important, if not critical, to success. This session will address the key lessons learned by NATO, the EU and the private sector in dealing with current and emerging threats. It is important to identify critical gaps in the existing efforts to implement a successful internal security policy and what needs to be done to address those shortfalls.

Focus Questions

  • What, if any, coordination exists between NATO and EU initiatives in areas of common concern (e.g., terrorism, cyber, etc.)? Where are the gaps, both within the EU and between the EU and NATO, and areas of potential overlap/institutional conflict?
  • Who has the responsibility for ensuring the integrity of critical infrastructure (industry? Individual nations? A collective organization?)
  • How can industry help both prevent and react to a threat and is there sufficient and timely “forensic” analysis capability to support an active response to a threat? What tools are needed that are not now available?

Session Chair

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting

Session Speakers

Commodore Georgij Alafuzoff

Intelligence Director

European Union Military Staff

European External Action Service

Commodore Alafuzoff is currently responsible for providing intelligence input both to EUMS planning and to crisis response planning and assessment for operations and exercises. Before being selected for his current position (April 2013), he was served as the Chief of Finland’s Military Intelligence (2007-2013). A graduate of Finland’s Military Academy, he has held top leadership roles in a variety of commands throughout his distinguished military and intelligence career both in Finland and in various EU and international assignments, including: Senior Staff Officer, Intelligence Division of the Finnish Defence Staff; as a Military Attaché; Chief, Joint Implementation Commission, KFOR, Kosovo; Liaison Office, US CENTCOM, Tampa, Florida; and Assistant Chief of Staff, J2, EUFOR RD Congo.

Mr. Ludwig Decamps

Director

Armament and Aerospace Capabilities Defence Investment Division NATO HQ

International Staff

Mr. Decamps is responsible for the promotion of NATO armaments cooperation and programmes that include: integrated air and missile defence, airspace management, joint intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (JISR), and a broad range of cooperative programmes in the land, aerospace, and maritime domain, including projects launched under NATO’s Smart Defence initiative. Prior to assuming his current position in June 2012, he led a Joint Civil Military Team in support of the Secretary General’s Smart Defence initiative. His earlier NATO portfolios included Ballistic Missile Defence, the Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS) programme, and NATO’s Defence Against Terrorism Programme. A graduate of Belgium’s Royal Military Academy, he had a distinguished army career, including as Head of the Belgian National Intelligence Cell in Kosovo, before a series of assignments at NATO.

Mr. Tim Harp

Director of Armaments

US NATO Mission

Mr. Harp provides direction and oversight regarding US participation in the development of armaments, communications, and electronics activities for NATO; represents US and Alliance acquisition and development programs; and provides assistance to US industry in pursuing NATO business opportunities. As Chairman of the Agency Supervisory Board (ASB), he is responsible for directing, administering, and controlling the NATO Communications and Information Agency - NATO’s principal Consultation, Command, and Control capability deliverer and Communications and Information Systems service provider. Prior to joining NATO he served for over 20 years in acquisition, logistics, and financial positions at all echelons of the U.S. Navy and the Department of Defense.

Ambassador Gábor Iklódy

Former Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges

NATO 

Ambassador Iklódy most recently was the NATO Secretary General’s primary advisor on emerging security challenges and their potential implications for the security of the Alliance and a member of the Secretary General’s senior management team.  The Division, which he directed and managed, provides a coordinated approach by the Alliance to the challenges of the 21st Century.  These include terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction proliferation, cyber threats, as well as energy security challenges, including those posed by environmental changes.

 

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

NETWORKING RECEPTION  ______________________________________________________________

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2013 

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

DAY TWO THEME:

CAN INTELLIGENCE AND TECHNOLOGY HELP MEET EUROPE’S SECURITY CHALLENGES? UNDERSTANDING THE REALITIES OF THE CYBER THREAT AS AN EXAMPLE

DAY TWO OVERVIEW

For intelligence to be relevant, it must adapt to, and live in, the omnipresent digital environment. Doing so, however, raises concerns about the right information going to the right people (sharing vs. security) and State intrusion into personal privacy. The nature of the threat is constantly changing, sometimes more rapidly than anticipated. Cyber epitomizes this and brings together disparate groups, all of which use cyber for their own ends. Achieving security in Europe today must start with successful intelligence that can react with the speed of the internet. This means bringing all the best intelligence and technology to bear. Cyber stands at the juncture of these trends and represents an entirely new threat environment, as well as a collection and operational opportunity.

Day One addressed actions that Europe (both the Alliance and EU institutions) are putting in place to deal with the new security threat reality. Day Two, using the cyber domain as an example, focuses on what intelligence needs to do, the shortfalls and challenges ahead, and the ways to meet these challenges through a better use of intelligence and technology.

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

DAY TWO WELCOME AND FEATURED SPEAKER INTRODUCTION

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting

 

8:15 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

THE TRUE NATURE OF THE CYBER THREAT TO EUROPEAN SECURITY 

Speaker

Mr. Eugene Kaspersky

Chief Executive Officer and Chairman

Kaspersky Lab

Eugene Kaspersky is an IT Security expert and the CEO and co-founder of Kaspersky Lab – an international company with regional offices in 30 countries and employing over 2,500 specialists. His mission is to ensure that Kaspersky Lab understands the cyber threat environment inside out – enabling it to develop competitive products and services to mitigate if not defeat the threats. And his is a unique perspective on whether or not legal and business environments are ‘cybersecurity friendly’, and also on how effective government agencies can be in providing for a nation’s cybersecurity.

Overview

Cyber is the latest domain, much like sea, land, air and space, where governments, industry and the public operate. Regardless, whether taken as a threat or an enabler of technological progress, it is omnipresent. A consequence of this new reality is that threats – to nations, industry, the public – exist in the cyber domain just as they did (and do) in other domains. Mr. Kaspersky, a leading expert in the nature of the cyber threat to individuals, nations and societies, will provide a context and framework for understanding the cyber domain and the nature of the current, and evolving, cyber threat to Europe (its governments, industry and the general public). He will provide his view on what sort of cooperation and collaboration is required among different constituencies both within and across national boundaries. He will also provide his view on whether a new government-industry partnership can address this issue given that the driving technologies are increasingly found in the private sector.

Focus Questions

  • Will the realities of the cyber domain fundamentally change how security is provided and maintained? Which objects are under attack or threatened? Are there new targets?
  • What should be done to establish a framework for global information sharing and joint efforts against cyber-crime?
  • Given that the private sector is the incubator of the technologies driving the rapid change in the cyber domain, what should be the role of industry in supporting governments to provide security from the cyber threats to European security?

 9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.  

SESSION FOUR: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE IN RESPONSES BY NATO AND THE EU TO THREATS IN THE CYBER DOMAIN 

Overview

In a 27 February 2013 interview in The Wall Street Journal, RSA Executive Chairman Art Coviello saidCriminals used to just do criminal stuff, and nation states just used to do nation-state stuff…. Now they are starting to collaborate.” Targeted and high profile cyberattacks on critical organizations and infrastructure may soon come to represent the permanent condition many countries will have to face. A key question is whether targets of such attacks will share such information, regardless of the purpose of the attack. This session will discuss the role of intelligence in new approaches that will be needed to deal with the ever-changing cyber threat to European security.

Focus Questions

  • What is the role of intelligence in the cyber domain? What ‘requirements’ are being levied on intelligence services and agencies? How are Intelligence Services to address the increasing role of social media?  Given the explosion of sources of information, how can analysts keep up?
  • What actions are being taken to mitigate threats? What coordination exists among EU institutions and between the EU and NATO to and between both and industry to share intelligence and information?
  • Is consideration being given to establishing a framework for global information sharing and joint efforts against cyber-threats? What can, and should, we expect of industry?

Session Chair

Mr. Joel Maloney

Director of National Intelligence Liaison Officer to NATO and Director for Defense Intelligence,

US Mission to NATO

Speakers

Mr. Suleyman Anil

Head, Cyber Defence Section, Emerging Security Challenges Division

NATO

Mr. Anil is responsible for  developing NATO’s cyber defence policy, action plans and concept of operations, as well as cyber defence cooperation and liaison with nations and international organizations. He also oversees coordination of capability deployments, integration of cyber defence into defence planning, the planning of cyber defence exercises and conducting cyber threat assessments and post-incident analyses. Previous posts at NATO included: policy development, and coordination of NATO-wide cyber defence issues including incidents, intelligence aspects and international liaison in the Office of Security; and the development and management of NATO’s operational Cyber Defence services (later on called NCIRC) from SHAPE. Before joining NATO in 1989, Mr. Anil worked for ITT/ALCATEL groups for 10 years on various ICT Projects in US, Africa and Europe.

Mr. Frank Asbeck

Principal Adviser for Space and Security Policy

European External Action Service (EEAS)

Mr. Asbeck is an acknowledged expert on cyber security and space policy. He has performed his advisory responsibilities since January 2010, first in the Commission (Directorate General RELEX), and now in the European External Action Service. He started his professional career at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, dealing with military usage of space and arms control. He then joined the German public service to deal with arms control, CBRN proliferation and East-West technology transfer. Following his assignment to the German Embassy in Brussels, he became Deputy Director of the Western European Union Satellite Center in Torrejón, Spain. From 2001 onwards, Mr. Asbeck worked at the European Commission as Head and Director of the newly created Security Directorate.

Mr. Benoit Godart

Head of Outreach

European Cybercrime Centre

 

Mr. Noboru Nakatani

Executive Director

INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation (IGCI)

Mr. Nakatani is the head of the IGCI, a research and development facility for the identification of crimes and criminals that provides innovative training and operational support for law enforcement across the globe. He previously held the post of Director of Information Systems and Technology at INTERPOL’s General Secretariat, overseeing the development of innovative IT services for the global law enforcement community. He also served as Assistant Director of INTERPOL’s Financial and High Tech Crime unit where he specialized in cybercrime and cyber security issues.  Mr. Nakatani holds the rank of Commissioner at the National Police Agency (NPA) of Japan and previously held the posts of Senior Assistant Director for cybercrime, Executive Officer to the Minister of State, Chairperson of the National Public Safety Commission, and Director of the Transnational Organized Crime Office.

 

10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK EXHIBITS

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 noon            

SESSION FIVE: CHALLENGES FOR INTELLIGENCE IN SUPPORTING EFFORTS TO COUNTER THREATS IN THE CYBER DOMAIN

Overview

Today intelligence agencies must operate in the cyber as well as the sea, land, air and space domains. This means that the traditional intelligence cycle must be equally relevant in each. This brings new challenges for collection, analysis, dissemination, sharing, etc. Operating in the cyber domain also raises additional legal, privacy and ethical issues. When it comes to sharing intelligence for internal security purposes, each country has different legal and political realities, in addition to the question of the role of a free press in this environment that can complicate matters. The emergence of social media as a vehicle for communication, commerce, crime and espionage must be addressed. Further, there now are blurred lines where security requirements overlap traditional military/intelligence/law enforcement and public privacy vs. their right-to-know distinctions. This session will identify some of the challenges that intelligence must address given the growing importance of the cyber domain to personal, corporate, national and collective security.

Focus Questions

  • What lessons should NATO and the EU have learned regarding how Intelligence Services must access, process and share information in today’s digital world? Can NATO and the EU support a common intelligence approach? If so, how?
  • Are there new, and unique, intelligence collection and analysis requirements to deal with the cyber threat? What is the role and responsibility of a free press in this environment?
  • How can the balance between security and issues of privacy and data protection be maintained given the growing cyber threat to both? What can, and should, we expect of industry?

Session Chair

Mr. Gregory Funaro

Head of Strategic Communications

Kaspersky Lab

Speakers

Mr. Jamie Bartlett

Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media Analysis (CASM)

Head of the Violence and Extremism Programme

Demos

Mr. Bartlett is a recognized expert in matters involving security in today’s digital world, especially on the ways in which social media and modern communications and technology are changing political and social movements, and has written extensively on the use of social media by terrorist and radical political movements. In 2012 he co-authored a paper in Intelligence and National Security with Sir David Omand and Carl Miller called “Introducing Social Media Intelligence (SOCMINT)” about how police and intelligence agencies should collect and use social media intelligence. He currently runs a research group that specialises in social media analytics for the purposes of public policy and research, with special focus on machine learning.

Mr. Raphael Satter

Cybersecurity Writer – London

Associated Press

Mr. Satter has been with The Associated Press for more than six years, reporting from Britain, France, Ireland, and Iceland. He currently covers cybersecurity and freedom of information issues out of London - including WikiLeaks, Britain's tabloid phone hacking scandal, and the rise of Anonymous. His work has often involved scanning reams of leaked documents for leads; one recent project required a custom-built search engine to parse more than 2 million emails taken from a set of Syrian servers. His analysis of the emails stolen from the University of East Anglia was part of an award-winning series of articles recognized by the Society of Environmental Journalists in 2010.

Mr. Peter Zinn

Senior Cybercrime Advisor

Dutch National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU)

Mr. Zinn is a strong believer in transparency and the sharing of information in tackling cybercrime. He serves as the liaison between law enforcement and the private sector. He developed strategy and tactical program for the NHTCU, thus translating his expertise into a high tech crime policy for the Dutch police. He is a member of several public-private information sharing centres concerning national and European vital infrastructures, including the financial sector. He has authored two books on the current state of trends in cybercrime.

12:00 noon – 1:15 p.m.

NETWORKING LUNCH

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

SESSION SIX:  STRENGTHENING THE GOVERNMENT--INDUSTRY INTELLIGENCE PARTNERSHIP FOR COLLECTIVE SECURITY

Overview

Today, in answer to the growing non-traditional threats to national and collective European security – of which cyber is a growing component - governments are proposing new initiatives to mitigate risks; for example, freer exchange of information on threats and vulnerabilities as they are identified. Unlike in the past, industry has been subject to many of the same security threats and issues facing governments. In fact, it is in the private sector that much of the work to enhance and protect the digital domain is being done.  This session will explore how the public and private sectors can better partner to enhance European security. Of particular interest will be the lessons learned over the past decade in dealing with security threats and what steps both governments and industry have taken, and need to take, to deal with the new realities.

Focus Questions

  • What should be the nature of future partnerships and cooperation between governments and industry? How can increased data sharing between government and the private sector be encouraged and additional trust and cooperation within industry be created?
  • Is there a business case for industry to support the IT and cybersecurity needs of governments rather than focusing solely on the private sector? How is industry constrained given the twin realities of the openness of the internet era and growing concerns for individual privacy and national security?
  • How can intelligence support for internal security be improved through technology?  What is the respective role/responsibility of government and industry if critical infrastructure is the target? What sectors of the European economy should be involved in the first place?

Session Chair

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting 

Speakers

Mr. Joel Maloney

Director of National Intelligence Liaison Officer to NATO and Director for Defense Intelligence, US Mission to NATO

Mr. Maloney is career intelligence professional.  He has served as a naval intelligence officer; Director, Military Operations Group, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Analysis and Production Directorate; and Chief of Staff, Office of the Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Intelligence Integration.  In his current position he is responsible for managing the defense and national intelligence portfolio for the US NATO Mission and for the development of policy, strategy, planning, programming, and requirements for the US intelligence effort at NATO.

Mr. Costin Raiu

Director, Global Research and Analysis Team

Kaspersky Lab

Mr. Raiu specializes in analyzing advanced persistent threats and high-level malware attacks.  He is leading the Global Research and Analysis Team at Kaspersky that researched the inner workings of Stuxnet, Duqu, Flame, Gauss and more recently, Red October and MiniDuke. Mr. Raiu's work includes analyzing malicious websites, exploits and online banking malware.  He has over 19 years of experience in anti-virus technologies and security research. He is a member of the Virus Bulletin Technical Advisory Board, a member of the Computer AntiVirus Researchers’ Organization (CARO) and a reporter for the Wildlist Organization International. Prior to joining Kaspersky Lab, Mr. Raiu worked for GeCad as Chief Researcher and as a Data Security Expert with the RAV antivirus developers group.

Mr. Lewis Shepherd

Director and General Manager

The Microsoft Institute

Microsoft Corporation

Mr. Shepherd has a twenty-five-year career dealing with the role of technology in governments and business. He has been with Microsoft since 2007, where his Microsoft Institute leads international efforts to use advanced research to solve major enterprise-wide problems of national, state and local governments in areas of  national security, counterterrorism, e-government, and education. Prior to Microsoft he served from 2003-2007 as Senior Technology Officer at the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, using his Silicon Valley background to evaluate DIA and DoD intelligence needs, evaluate technology investments across the community, and manage high-impact special projects for the Director of National Intelligence on key issues of information sharing and improved analysis.

 

Mr. Samuel Visner

Vice President and General Manager, Global Cybersecurity

CSC

Mr. Visner, an experienced national security professional, currently leads CSC’s cyber business, including the development and management of cybersecurity technologies, services, and solutions. He is also an Associate of the National Intelligence Council (NIC), where he supports the Intelligence Community on cyber crime and other matters, and is a member of the Intelligence Community Strategic Studies Group supporting the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Mr. Visner teaches as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, where he presents a course on the effects of information technology on international security. A prolific writer, his most recent article discusses the need for stronger public/private sector information sharing for cybersecurity. Prior to joining CSC he served in senior executive positions at SAIC, Booz Allen, and as Chief of Signals Intelligence programs at the National Security Agency.

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK 

2:45 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

SPEAKER INTRODUCTION

Mr. Joel Maloney

Director of National Intelligence Liaison Officer to NATO and Director for Defense Intelligence,

US Mission to NATO

2:50 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.   

LOOKING FORWARD: WHAT NEW INTELLIGENCE CAPABILITIES AND APPROACHES ARE REQUIRED?  

Speaker

Ambassador Alexander Vershbow

Deputy Secretary General (and Smart Defence Envoy)

NATO

Ambassador Vershbow took up his current position in February 2012.  A distinguished career diplomat, he has served as U.S. Ambassador to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (1998-2001); to the Russian Federation (2001-2005); and to the Republic of Korea (2005-2008). He has held numerous senior positions in Washington, including: Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs just before assuming his current post; Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for European Affairs at the National Security Council; and State Department Director for Soviet Union Affairs. During his long career, he has been centrally involved in strengthening U.S. defense relations with allies in Europe and Asia and in transforming NATO and other European security organizations to meet post-Cold War challenges.

Overview

We are fortunate to have as our closing speaker an individual who is at the nexus of collective security and who is uniquely prepared to provide a critical assessment of the intelligence lessons we should have learned and the root causes of the situation we face. Attention will be paid to the issues of governance; sharing intelligence; how to collaborate more effectively with industry, which is not only a target for hostile activity, but a provider of solutions; and some sense of where intelligence support to European security needs to go as well as the inhibitors to getting there. The speaker will provide a perspective on just what the nature and role of intelligence can and should be in supporting Europe’s internal security policy and strategy, including any structural changes that may be required for them to provide the most effective support to national and collective security.

Focus Questions

  • Given the likely future, are national and collective governments today up to the challenge?
  • Is a new ‘grand bargain’ needed between Parliaments, Governments and their security and intelligence authorities to establish the appropriate balance between the public’s rights to security, to privacy and to the due process of law in the new threat environment? 
  • What is the nature of future partnerships and cooperation among governments, industry and the public that are required?

3:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.                  

FORUM WRAP-UP

Mr. John Rixse

JHR Consulting