Innovation Theater

The Engagement Theaters on the exhibit floor offer a professional development opportunity for government and industry to present their challenges and solutions.  One hour sessions include educational seminars, demonstrations and panel discussions. Sessions pre-approved for Continuing Education Units (CEUs) will be designated with a **.

The Innovation Theater is located in the Exhibit Hall, end of aisle #1000



Innovation Theater Schedule:

Tuesday, May 14

9:40 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.

Maritime Security in the Evolving Littoral and Fiscal Environments –  The Enduring Coastal Cutter Model

CAPT D. "Scott" Bauby, USCG (confirmed)

Chief of Operational Forces

Coast Guard Atlantic Area

National security interests continue to converge in coastal waters around the globe.  Moving forward into uncertain security environments and austere fiscal constraints, the USCG is challenged to explore innovative ways of achieving maritime security.  The multi-mission Cutter endures as an efficient and persistent maritime security instrument.  Enduring fundamentals are even more relevant in this austere and littoral environment -- independent patrolling, self-sustaining logistics, open ocean sea keeping, shoal depth access, and C4I nodal links across agencies and services to Municipal Dispatchers and National Command Authorities. Attend this session to better understand the "risk math" for maintaining an effective presence in the face of persistent threats.


 

Tuesday, May 14

10:50 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Coast Guard Enhanced Mission C4IT Capabilities (EMC2)

CAPT Michael J. Johnston, USCG (confirmed)

Commanding Officer

Command, Control & Communications Engineering Center(C3CEN)

The Coast Guard's Enhanced Mission C4IT Capabilities (EMC2) initiative aims to seize that opportunity.  EMC2 is not a product or system but rather a strategy that involves a common architecture and framework. Leveraging things like the Ozone Widget Framework (DISAs JC2 environment) and other innovations, we will utilize an application-based approach, much like a smart phone, to deliver existing capabilities without redundant supporting infrastructure in a way that allows them to better work together while allowing for future growth and rapid integration of emerging technologies.   Ultimately it will allow all operational Coast Guard forces to interact with each other in a seamless and reliable manner.  Bottom line, it's increased performance but at reduced costs that will poise the Coast Guard to meet future challenge both afloat and on shore.

 


 

Tuesday, May 14

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Air-Sea Battle Implementation-- In the Non-Permissive Environment

Maj Gen Charles W. Lyon, USAF (confirmed)

Director of Operations

Air Combat Command

PRESENTATION

This new construct provides significant ways & means to achieve the ends of our emerging and enduring national security objectives. Air Combat Command, as the lead Air Force command for the combat air forces, is implementing Air-Sea  Battle by training our current force to conduct cross-domain operations in the non-permissive environment.


 

Tuesday, May 14

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Sea Change in Watchstanding

CAPT John Cordle, USN (confirmed)

Chief of Staff

Surface Forces Atlantic

Author of "Sea Change in Standing Watch"

PRESENTATION

Watches on Navy ships are normally stood in a rotating fashion with little regard for the human circadian rhythm. This results in reduced sleep and irregular sleeping patterns and fatigue. In safety studies, fatigue is often cited as a major causal factor in many mishaps. It is also a significant factor in shipboard stress, and can result in significant lost productivity or even personnel loss.  Attendees will learn about a different watch rotation concept which considers human circadian rhythm, and can produce significant savings in terms of personnel productivity and safety in dangerous shipboard evolutions.  The discussion will include an overview of data from the Safety Center, the 3/9 rotation, and how this concept was proven on USS SAN JACINTO and is ready to be  implemented throughout the fleet.


 

Wednesday, May 15

9:40 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.

Defense Support of Civil Authorities

CAPT Steve Hamer, CEC, USN (confirmed)

Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations

Navy Expeditionary Combat Command

PRESENTATION

In cooperation with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) the Department of Defense (DoD) has identified Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA) as a priority mission. When directed the DoD provides assistance to all domestic civil authorities in the event of natural or manmade disasters. Although DoD is always in a support role to civilian authorities for disaster response, the capacity, capabilities, training and professionalism the DoD provides to the response effort saves lives, alleviates suffering and protects property. Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) provides specialized maritime forces in the form of adaptive force packages to support DSCA missions. The forces available include Naval Construction Forces (SEABEES), Mobile Diving and Salvage Units (MDSU), Navy Expeditionary Logistics Units (NAVELSG), and Coastal Riverine Forces (CRF). NECC serves as the single functional command and force provider for expeditionary forces. During a DSCA event, NECC becomes CTF-86 and is responsible for command & control (C2) of designated forces conducting DSCA operations ashore.


 

Wednesday, May 15

10:50 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Implementing Solutions from Emerging Naval Leaders

LT Diana Beauford (confirmed)

VFA-106

 

LT Jason Chuma (confirmed)

NWDC

LT Ben Kohlmann (confirmed)

NWDC
April 2013 SIGNAL Magazine article authored by LT Kohlmann

The Navy has recently stood up a select group of emerging leaders from across the naval enterprise tasked with developing disruptive technological and tactical solutions that can be rapidly fielded in support of the Fleet. This organization is the CNO's Rapid Development Cell (CRIC) and is sponsored by the Navy Warfare Development Command (NWDC), who provides a safe-haven for those solutions unlikely to receive a voice in the traditional solution development and approval process. As part of their research and recommendations, the CRIC engages with civilian entrepreneurs and academic experts to develop cutting edge ideas.


 

Wednesday, May 15

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Young AFCEANs Take on DoD Acquisition & Emerging Technology Integration Strategy

Young AFCEAns are military, government, academia, and business entrepreneurs under the age of 40 whom are focused on both the evolution and transformation of the technology space globally.  With the various backgrounds and mission priorities represented, their end-goals are the same: Protecting the warfighter, our way of life, and striving for full-spectrum dominance.  Young AFCEAns often think of perceived “hard problems" differently and are known to come up with many innovative ways to address complex issues.  For this session, a small sample of Young AFCEAns will attack the two high-level contemporary problems of DoD Acquisition and Emerging Technology Integration Strategy.  With the speed of technology exponentially increasing, the  need to evaluate, acquire, respond, and evolve poses many challenges. This panel of Young AFCEAns shed new perspectives on these issues and stand ready to engage in dialogue with attendees.


 

Wednesday, May 15

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

The Value of Aircraft Carriers
VADM (Sel.) Ted Branch, USN (confirmed)

Commander

Naval Air Force Atlantic

PRESENTATION

A discussion of the value of the Aircraft Carrier past, present and future.  Topics will include:

  • Inherent advantages of U.S. Navy aircraft carriers
  • Adaptability of carriers
  • Future utilization of carriers

 

Wednesday, May 15

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

A "New Normal": Evolving Global Security Requirements and the U.S. Marine Corps' Role in Meeting Them
Col Stuart L. Dickey, USMC (confirmed)

Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7

U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command

PRESENTATION

Recent global events dictate the U.S. must adapt its approach to protecting U.S. facilities and personnel abroad from a new and increasingly dangerous security atmosphere that has been characterized as the "New Normal."  DoD and DoS believe this calls for an evolved approach.  This new approach emphasizes "proactive measures" that combine early reinforcement of U.S. facilities, new force sharing agreements between combatant commanders, and CONUS-based and forward deployed crisis response options.  These measures offer rapid action during periods of disintegrating security effectiveness.  Actions include new baselines for security at all U.S. facilities, increased importance of USMC Marine Security Guards, and updating MSG mission/tasks codified via DoS and USMC MOA.  Additionally, Geographic Combatant Commanders will update Emergency Action Plans to reflect this 'New Normal' paradigm and identify appropriate proactive measures, sourced from both assigned and allocated forces.  The Marine Corps is developing amphibious and expeditionary crisis/contingency force aggregation models, working with SOCOM towards closer support and integration, developing deployable cyber capabilities, and determining force posture options to best meet regional requirements.  The interagency goal is for DoS and DoD to be better postured to provide enhanced security measures abroad to protect vital U.S. facilities and personnel.


 

Thursday, May 16

9:40 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.

A Return to Our Amphibious Roots: Exercise Bold Alligator 13

Col Marc Riccio, USMC (confirmed)

Director, G3
II Marine Expeditionary Force

PRESENTATION

BOLD ALLIGATOR- 13 was the third in a series of annual amphibious scenario-driven exercise alternating between synthetic and live, designed to improve Naval Amphibious Core Competency through focusing on the Single Naval Battle Concept and refining Expeditionary Strike Group Two (ESG 2), 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade (2d MEB), and Carrier Strike Group Twelve(CSG 12) staffs' ability to plan and execute MEB-sized Amphibious Operations from a Sea-base operating in a medium threat Anti-Access/Area-Denial (A2/AD) environment.

Focus areas of the exercise included:

  • Command & Control (C2) Relationships throughout all phases of Operations
  • Naval Staff Integration
  • Force Apportionment & Employment
  • Examination of current Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Combat Systems & Intelligence (C5I) Capabilities
  • Load Planning & Coordination
  • Assessment of Naval Amphibious Capabilities, Doctrine & Tactics, Techniques & Procedures (TTPs)

 


 

Thursday, May 16

10:50 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command: A Leadership Perspective

Col Steven J Grass, USMC (confirmed)

Col John Del Colliano, USMC (Ret.) (confirmed)

PRESENTATION

This presentation will provide a leadership perspective of MARSOC organizational and operational issues relevant to current day warfighters, staffs and industry partners.  Topics will encompass issues relating to the organization and mission of the Component, operational viewpoints from global operations, and perspectives on future adaptations to meet emerging missions and challenges.  Additionally, lessons learned from Operation Enduring Freedom will be discussed as they relate to C4 for both MARSOC and the General Purpose Force.  "Marines are who we are, Special Operations are what we do."