PROGRAM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2013

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Ms. Terry Roberts

President

Naval Intelligence Professionals

8:15 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

WELCOME & INFORMATION DOMINANCE OVERVIEW

The global spread of sophisticated information technology is changing the speed at which warfare is conducted.  The U.S. Navy has long enjoyed information superiority over potential adversaries.  However, the Navy's advantage is eroding as more nations, transnational criminal organizations, and non-state actors are acquiring and employing more advanced computing and networked systems.  To meet these challenges, the Navy is aggressively pursuing a multi-faceted approach to warfighting which ensures our information superiority in future conflicts.  The Navy Strategy for Achieving Information Dominance frames the approach and will guide the development of our information capabilities as well as their integration in the fleet.  This opening session provides an overview of the Strategy, which will serve as the context for the conference’s agenda.

Speaker

VADM Kendall Card, USN

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. 

SESSION ONE: PRESIDENT’S BUDGET (PB) FISCAL YEAR-14 OVERVIEW

The constrained fiscal environment poses many new challenges to the development of Navy Information Dominance.  In addition, the belt tightening comes at a time when the Navy’s informational advantage is eroding as more nations, transnational criminal organizations and non-state actors acquire and employ information as a weapon of their own.  This session will provide a PB FY-14 overview identifying growth areas and cuts, and the Navy’s priorities given the threats that the nations faces.

 

Focus Questions

  • What adjustments to the Information Dominance Strategy are being made as a result of the fiscal environment?
  • Which Information Dominance programs are the Navy focusing on and where are the growth areas for Industry?
  • How can Industry partners help Navy Information Dominance meet these fiscal challenges?

 

Speaker

Mr. Mark Andress, SES

Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance

9:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. 

SESSION TWO: ASSURED C2

The Navy must be able to command forces in any environment, coordinate fires in and across all domains, continually assess the effect of these fires, and monitor the status of its forces.  Maritime operations require assured access to space assets, the electromagnetic spectrum, and computer networks.  To succeed in contested environments, particularly in Anti-Access/Areas Denial (A2/AD) scenarios, the Navy must improve the adaptability and security of its information infrastructure by strengthening governance, setting and enforcing Navy-wide standards, and building C2 paths that resist routine faults and cyber and electronic attack.  This session will highlight the challenges and opportunities for industry to assist the Navy in maintaining resilient communications for assured command and control.

 

Focus Questions

  • How does the Navy intend to connect the right user with the information necessary to make decisions?
  • What steps is the Navy taking to ensure access to the electromagnetic spectrum?
  • How can Industry help the Navy build resilient and assured networks?

Speakers

Mr. Matthew H. Swartz 

Director, Communications and Networks

Ms. Janice C. Haith 

Director, Assessments and Compliance Chief Information Officer

  

10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK

10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

SESSION THREE: BATTLESPACE AWARENESS

Understanding and exploiting the maritime and information environments is essential to successful maneuver warfare and sea control.  To win, warfighters must have superior, predictive knowledge of both their physical and virtual battlespace.  They must know ant adversary’s specific disposition, capabilities, and vulnerability in order to successfully acquire and deter or engage targets in a timely manner.  Therefore, persistent, end-to-end theater-focused Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) is crucial.  Moreover, effective coordination with national, joint and coalition partners will expand the Navy’s aggregate maritime domain awareness.  This session will provide insight into the Navy’s requirements to assure a tactical advantage over its adversaries in battlespace awareness.

  

Focus Questions

  • What challenges does the Navy face as it works to understand, monitor, and incorporate data regarding the physical environment into the execution of operations?
  • What is the future of the Navy’s ISR family of systems and how can industry help?

Speakers

RADM Jonathan W. White, USN 

Director, Oceanography, Space & Maritime Domain Awareness Directorate

 

RDML DeWolfe Miller, USN 

Director, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Capabilities Division

RDML(Sel) Bruce Loveless, USN

Director, Intelligence Operations

11:30 p.m. -  12:15 p.m.

SESSION FOUR: INTEGRATED FIRES

The Navy will project power through the network and across the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum, integrating kinetic and non-kinetic fires to maximize lethal and non-lethal effects, and accelerate speed of command.  To this end, the Navy will expand and strengthen its operations within cyberspace and the EM spectrum.  To dominate in these areas, the Navy will further develop its cyber workforce, bolster related research and development, and refine its governance, policy, and tactics, techniques and procedures.  Specifically, it must improve its offensive cyber capability.  Likewise, the Navy must continue to advance its electronic warfare capabilities in order to disrupt, adversary surveillance, targeting, and C2, and effectively counter anti-ship cruise missiles and ballistic missiles alike.  This session will provide insight into the Navy’s plans for strengthening its ability to leverage the use of its electronic warfare capabilities.

 

Focus Questions

  • What are the key challenges in Navy electronic warfare?
  • How can Industry help the Navy develop the tactics, techniques, and procedures required to successfully operate its networks and in the EM spectrum.

Speaker

Ms. Margaret G. Palmieri 

Director, Decision Superiority

CAPT Steve Carder

Director, Cyber and Electronic Warfare

12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

LUNCH AND NETWORKING

 

1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

SESSION FIVE: NAVY CYBER POWER 2020

Navy Cyber Power 2020 is the Navy’s strategy for providing Navy and Joint commanders with an operational advantage through assuring access to cyberspace and confident C2, preventing strategic surprise in cyberspace, and delivering decisive cyber effects.  The strategy is based upon an assessment of the strategic environment impacting Navy cyberspace operations.  It describes the key end-state characteristics that the Navy must create and the major strategic initiatives it will pursue to achieve success.  The Navy has historically depended upon global reach, persistent presence, and operational flexibility.  Its engagement in cyberspace will be founded upon these bedrock fundamentals.  This session will discuss how industry and academia can contribute to the initiative developed through Navy Cyber Power 2020 while ensuring the most efficient use of defense resources.

 

Focus Questions

  • What are the biggest challenges facing Navy cyber operations?
  • Where can industry help the Navy operate its networks both offensively and defensively?

Speaker

VADM Michael S. Rogers, USN 

Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/Commander, U.S. 10th Fleet

2:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

SESSION SIX:  BUILDING TOMORROW’S INFORMATION DOMINANCE CAPABILITIES

To maintain the Navy’s advantage in the Information Domain, it must continually develop new capabilities and advance future operational concepts.  These future capability needs must address the complex challenges presented by both rising peer competitors and irregular/asymmetric warfare. Information Dominance priorities include integrated C2, ISR and combat systems decision making, spectrum dominance, computer network operations, communications and networks, and computational environment architecture.  This session will highlight the areas in which industry can partner with the Navy to help achieve its most critical priorities.

 

Focus Questions

  • How do you see the future of Naval Warfare with respect to Information Dominance capabilities?
  • What is the role of academic institutions, industry, and other organizations in Navy S&T?

Speaker

RADM Matthew L. Klunder, USN 

Chief of Naval Research/Director, Innovation, Technology Requirements, and Test & Evaluation

2:45 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK

3:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.

SESSION SEVEN: INFORMATION DOMINANCE PANEL

During this session, the panel members will respond to questions from the audience.

Moderator

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Panelists

VADM Kendall Card, USN

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance

VADM Michael S. Rogers, USN

Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/Commander, U.S. 10th Fleet

 

RADM Patrick H. Brady, USN 

Commander, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command

 

RADM Matthew L. Klunder, USN

Chief of Naval Research/Director, Innovation, Technology Requirements, and Test & Evaluation

3:45 p.m.

CONFERENCE WRAP-UP

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Ms. Terry Roberts

President

Naval Intelligence Professionals