PROGRAM

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

AFCEA AND NIP WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Former Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Ms. Terry Roberts

NIP Engagement Lead

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

NAVY INFORMATION DOMINANCE

 

Overview

The global spread of sophisticated information technology is changing the speed at which warfare is conducted.  The U.S. Navy has long enjoyed information superiority over potential adversaries.  However, the Navy's advantage is eroding as more nations and non-state actors acquire and employ more sophisticated computing and networked systems.  To meet these challenges, the Navy is aggressively pursuing a multi-faceted approach to warfighting to ensure information superiority in future conflicts.  The Navy Strategy for Achieving Information Dominance frames that approach, guiding the development of our information capabilities and their integration in the fleet.  This opening session will provide an overview of the strategy and the context for the remainder of the conference agenda.

Speaker

VADM Ted Branch, USN

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance

8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

SESSION ONE: PRESIDENT’S BUDGET (PB) FISCAL YEAR-15 OVERVIEW 

Overview

The constrained fiscal environment poses many challenges to the development of Navy Information Dominance.  Additionally, required belt tightening comes at a time when the Navy’s historic advantage in the Information Domain is eroding, as more nations and non-state actors acquire and employ information as a weapon.  This session will provide a PB FY-15 overview, identifying areas of growth and risk, and the Navy’s current priorities given current and emerging threats.

Focus Questions

  • What are the impacts of the current fiscal environment on Navy efforts to achieve the objectives of the Information Dominance Strategy?
  • Which Information Dominance programs and capabilities is the Navy focusing on and where are potential growth areas for industry?
  • How can industry partners help Navy Information Dominance meet its objectives given current fiscal challenges?

Speaker

Mr. Mark Andress

Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance

9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:  ELECTROMAGNETIC MANEUVER WARFARE

Overview

According to Chief of Naval Operations ADM Jonathan Greenert, “The electromagnetic-cyber environment is now so fundamental to military operations and so critical to our national interests that we must start treating it as a warfighting domain on par with—or perhaps even more important than—land, sea, air, and space.  Future wars will not be won simply by effectively using the EM spectrum and cyberspace; they will be won within the EM-cyber domain.”  During this session, CNO Greenert will share his views on how the U.S. Navy must develop and employ innovative operating concepts, new systems, and a fresh approach to thinking about modern warfare, to prevail in the EM-cyber environment.

Speaker

ADM Jonathan W. Greenert, USN

Chief of Naval Operations

9:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK

10:15 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

SESSION TWO: ASSURED C2  

Overview

The Navy must be able to command forces in any environment, coordinate fires in and across all domains, continually assess the effect of those fires, and monitor the status of its forces.  Maritime operations require assured access to space assets, the electromagnetic spectrum, and computer networks.  To succeed in contested environments, particularly in anti-access/areas denial (A2/AD) scenarios, the Navy must improve the adaptability and security of its information infrastructure by strengthening governance, setting and enforcing Navy-wide standards, and building C2 paths that resist routine faults and cyber and electronic attack.  This session will highlight the challenges and opportunities for Industry to assist the Navy in maintaining resilient communications for assured command and control.

 

Focus Questions

  • How does the Navy intend to connect the right user with the information necessary to make decisions?
  • What steps is the Navy taking to ensure access to the electromagnetic spectrum?
  • How can industry help the Navy build resilient and assured networks?

Speakers

Mr. Matthew H. Swartz

Director, Communications and Networks

11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

SESSION THREE: BATTLESPACE AWARENESS

Overview

Deep understanding the maritime and information environments is essential to successful maneuver warfare and sea control.  To win, warfighters must have superior, predictive knowledge of both their physical and virtual battlespace.  They must know an adversary’s specific disposition, capabilities, and vulnerabilities in order to successfully acquire and deter or engage targets in a timely manner.  Therefore, persistent end-to-end theater-focused intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) is crucial.  Moreover, effective coordination with national, joint and coalition partners will expand the Navy’s aggregate maritime domain awareness.  This session will provide insight into the Navy’s requirements to assure a tactical advantage over its adversaries in battlespace awareness.

Focus Questions

  • What challenges does the Navy face as it works to understand, monitor, and incorporate data regarding the physical environment into the execution of operations?
  • What is the future of the Navy’s ISR family of systems and how can industry help?

Speakers

RADM Jonathan W. White, USN

Director, Oceanography, Space & Maritime Domain Awareness Directorate 

CAPT Clete Boyer, USN

Director, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Capabilities Division

Mr. Dustin Gard-Weiss

Director, Intelligence Operations Division

11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

LUNCH AND NETWORKING

12:45 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

SESSION FOUR: INTEGRATED FIRES

Overview

The Navy will project power through the network and across the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum, integrating kinetic and non-kinetic fires to maximize lethal and non-lethal effects and accelerate speed of command.  To this end, the Navy will expand and strengthen its operational capabilities within cyberspace and the EM spectrum.  To dominate in these areas, the Navy will further develop its cyber workforce, bolster related research and development, and refine its governance, policy, tactics, techniques, and procedures.  Specifically, it must improve its offensive cyber capability.  Likewise, the Navy must continue to advance its electronic warfare capabilities in order to disrupt adversary surveillance, targeting, and C2, and effectively counter anti-ship cruise and ballistic missiles.  This session will provide insight into the Navy’s plans for strengthening its ability to leverage the use of its electronic warfare capabilities. 

Focus Questions

  • What are the key challenges in Navy electronic warfare?
  • How can industry help the Navy develop the tactics, techniques, and procedures required to successfully operate its networks and in the EM spectrum.

Speakers

Ms. Margie Palmieri

Director, Decision Superiority 

Mr. Bill Bray

Executive Director, PEO IWS

1:30 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

SESSION FIVE: S&T OBJECTIVES AND R&D

Overview

To maintain the Navy’s advantage in the information domain, it must continually develop new capabilities and advance future operational concepts.  These future capability needs must address the complex challenges presented by both rising peer competitors and irregular/asymmetric warfare.  This session will highlight the areas in which industry can partner with the Navy to help achieve its most critical priorities.

Focus Questions

  • What is the future of Naval Warfare with respect to Information Dominance capabilities?
  • What is the role of academic institutions, industry, and other organizations in Navy S&T?

Speakers

Mr. Troy Johnson

Director, Capability Integration

Mr. Bryan Scurry

Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command

Dr. Wen Masters

Office of Naval Research

CAPT Michael Graham

Naval Sea Systems Command

Dr. Jim Sheehy

Naval Air Systems Command

2:15 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

SESSION SIX: R&D CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES

Speaker

RADM Matthew L. Klunder, USN

Chief of Naval Research/Director, Innovation, Technology Requirements, and Test & Evaluation

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK

3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

SESSION SEVEN: NAVY ACQUISITION PANEL – DELIVERING INFORMATION DOMINANCE CAPABILITIES TO THE FLEET

Overview

This session will feature representatives from Navy systems commands and program executive offices to highlight key issues in the acquisition realm and answer questions from the audience on the acquisition and fielding of specific Navy programs and capabilities.

Speaker

Mr. Victor S. Gavin

Program Executive Officer, Enterprise Information Systems 

4:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

SESSION EIGHT: INFORMATION DOMINANCE PANEL

Overview

During this closing session, panel members will give brief closing remarks and address remaining questions from the audience.

Moderator

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Former Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Panelists

VADM Ted Branch, USN

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance

VADM Jan E. Tighe, USN

Commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/Commander, U.S. 10th Fleet

RADM Patrick H. Brady, USN

Commander, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command 

RADM Matthew L. Klunder, USN

Chief of Naval Research

Director, Innovation, Technology Requirements, and Test & Evaluation

4:30 p.m.

CLOSING REMARKS

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Former Chairman of the Board

Naval Intelligence Professionals

Ms. Terry Roberts

NIP Engagement Lead