WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 2012

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND EXHIBITS

Sponsored by

 

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

AFCEA WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

 

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS WELCOME

RADM Alexander Miller, USN (Ret.)

Senior Client Executive

Berico Technologies

Mr. Carl Solomon

Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer

Entegra Systems

Mr. Patrick Warfle

Deputy Director of Military Support

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency 

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

NGA's VISION

Overview

NGA is well on its way toward implementing its vision to “Put the Power of GEOINT in Your Hands.”  A number of vision-implementing Strategic Initiatives have been prototyping real improvements directly with users and across NGA’s business processes since last summer.  This transformation of GEOINT is helping NGA and its mission partners move beyond simply telling first responders, warfighters or policymakers where something is and instead informing them why it is and what may happen next. 

Focus Questions

  • How is the implementation of NGA’s Vision helping to improve analytical capability for GEOINT analysts and the Intelligence Community (IC)?
  • How will GEOINT’s transformation along the lines of NGA’s Vision help the broader IC improve its ability to reduce risk for intelligence users?
  • How does NGA intend to transform its business process toward these goals in a fiscally constrained environment?
  • What role do you expect Industry to play as a partner in these efforts?

Speaker

Director Letitia Long

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

THE IC IN THE COMING DECADE: PERSPECTIVES AND CHALLENGES

Overview

The Intelligence Community transformed itself dramatically to meet the Nation’s counterterrorism intelligence requirements.  In the coming decade, the need for change and adaptation will be crucial as the U.S. continues to face a complex and rapidly changing national security environment in which nation states, non-state actors, and other transnational forces increasingly challenge and threaten U.S. national interests.

Focus Questions

  • What are the key imperatives for the Intelligence Community that will enable it to maintain, develop, and hone the decision advantage for warfighters, policy makers, and first responders?
  • How do you determine and what is the right balance between current operational support and strategic warning?
  • Given the expected fiscal constraints, where should the Intelligence Community invest and where can it afford to take a risk? 

Speaker

Mr. David Shedd

Deputy Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

BREAK AND EXHIBITS

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10:45 a.m. – 12:00 noon  

SESSION ONE: CUSTOMER PERSPECTIVES ON ANALYTICAL NEEDS

Overview

Over the last decade of combat operations, intelligence and operations have become linked in ways that are much different and more complex than during the Cold War.  Changes in future intelligence analysis will be even more dramatic and driven by threats and missions demanding more data from increasingly diverse sources – including technical collection,  HUMINT, Open Source, and human and socio-cultural geography.  Evolving automation and analytical aids will assist in "teeing up" information in more intuitive forms for the analyst, but also will increase training and developmental demands.  More diverse educational backgrounds, skills and career paths will need to be melded to produce the future analyst cadre.  This session will explore the IC customer perspectives on analytical needs.

 Focus Questions

  • How does your organization perceive that the threat will be different in the future? 
  • In what areas are you dependent on intelligence (and analytical capabilities) from external sources?  
  • In what areas do you need organic capabilities?
  • How much can be accomplished via reach back versus forward deployed support?
  • How will your organization adapt given budget reductions?

Co-Chairs

Mr. Collin Agee

Senior Advisor for IC Engagement

Headquarters, Department of the Army (G2)

Maj Gen John Casciano, USAF (Ret.)

President and CEO

GrayStar Associates, LLC

Speakers

Chief Cathy Lanier

Chief of Police

Washington DC Metropolitan Police Department

Chief Lanier serves as the Chief Executive Officer of one of the ten largest local police agencies in the United States.  Her department is on the forefront of technological crime fighting advances, from evidence analysis to state-of the-art-information technology.

MG David Lacquement, USA

J3, Director of Operations

US Cyber Command

MG David Lacquement’s responsibilities involve planning and conducting operations to defend the DoD IT infrastructure and, if authorized, to conduct offensive cyber operations in support of national and combatant commander objectives.

Brigadier General Sean P. Mulholland, USA

Deputy Director of  Operations (J3)

United States Special Operations Command

12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m.

LUNCH AND EXHIBITS

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1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

CT/COIN, STRATEGIC WARNING AND ASSESSMENT: WHAT BALANCE IS RIGHT?

Overview

The national security community historically has fought the last war. Since the September 11th attacks, the IC, the DoD, and other agencies have invested an overwhelming amount of time and money on the counter-terrorism (CT) and counter-insurgency (COIN) missions.  Meanwhile, other asymmetric threats like cyber have emerged.  The U.S. is at a critical point in its strategic decision-making that could have a long lasting effect on national security.  If the wrong investment decisions are made now, the U.S. may react to threats for years to come, instead of getting ahead of and shaping the threat environment.

 

Focus Questions

  • What is the right balance between Counter-Terrorism/Counter-Insurgency and strategic warning and assessment?
  • What does the IC need to do to achieve that balance?
  • What are the most important changes that the IC can make in the area of analysis and analytics that will give the biggest return on investment for the intelligence mission?
  • How should the IC deal with the budget cutting actions in the analysis and analytics domain?

Speaker

Mr. Charles Allen

Principal

Chertoff Group

Mr. Allen served as the Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis, Department of Homeland Security, and the Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Collection, Central Intelligence Agency. As the principal adviser to the Director of Central Intelligence on collection management, he revolutionized the way the national intelligence agencies coordinate their activities.

2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

DESSERT BREAK

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3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

SESSION TWO: WHAT DO INTELLIGENCE ANALYSTS NEED NOW?

Overview

The Intelligence Community’s analytic workforce has changed dramatically since 9/11.  While the number of analysts has greatly increased, the average years of experience has declined.  Customers and missions have diversified and grown.  Information from a variety of new sensors and sources has swelled.  Analysts routinely deploy into conflict zones to work side-by-side with warfighters.  Analysis is produced, disseminated, and consumed in shorter timeframes.  The power of social networking tools has highlighted the need to understand and use them.  These changes have stressed analytic organizations to provide the right training, information access, data-mining and collaboration tools, as well as new work processes and policies.  The next few years will bring further stress as analytic organizations cope with tighter budgets.  In this session, speakers representing a cross section of experience will highlight what intelligence analysts need now.

Focus Questions

  • How would you characterize the current state of analysis?
  • What are the key insights from the Intelligence 21 and National Academy of Sciences Study: “Intelligence Analysis for Tomorrow: Advances from the Behavior and Social Sciences”?
  • In the future, how must analysts adapt to meet the evolving customer needs?
  • How must analytic mission processes, techniques, tradecraft, training, tools, and industry partnerships change to meet these needs?

Co-Chairs

Ms. Katherine Hall

Vice President and General Manager

BAE Systems

Mr. Carl Solomon

Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer

Entegra Systems

 

Speakers

Ms. Leslie Ireland

Assistant Secretary

Office of Intelligence & Analysis

U.S. Department of the Treasury

Ms. Ireland oversees the receipt, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence related to the Department's mission to safeguard the international financial system from abuse and to combat threats to U.S. national security.

 

Ms. Jackie Adair

Intelligence Analyst

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Ms. Jacqueline Adair serves as an Intelligence Analyst with a focus on targeting at the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In her prior assignment, she served as a member of the ODNI's RASER (Rapid Analytic Support and Expeditionary Response) Team.  

 

Mr. Dustin Gard-Weiss

Chief, Intelligence Analysis and Collection
Office of the Chief of Naval Operations

As Chief of Intelligence Analysis and Collection, Mr. Gard-Weiss is responsible for managing the provision of current and strategic intelligence to Navy leadership and their staffs, establishing and representing Navy’s intelligence position within the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC), and integrating Navy’s priority information needs with corresponding full-spectrum collection capabilities.

Ms. Beth Sanner

Director, Office of South Asia Analysis

Central Intelligence Agency

Ms. Sanner holds the rank of SIS-4 and currently serves as the Director of the Office of South Asia Analysis inthe CIA's Directrate of Intelligence.  Prior to this assignment, she was Deputy Director of the Office of Russian and European Analysis (OREA).

 

Mr. Charles Schmidt

Strategic Initiative Executive for Intelligence Support

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Mr. Schmidt provides the US policy and military communities with more robust, holistic and anticipatory GEOINT analysis.

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. 

NETWORKING RECEPTION AND EXHIBITS

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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2012

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND EXHIBITS

Sponsored by

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

AFCEA WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS WELCOME

RADM Alexander Miller, USN (Ret.)

Senior Client Executive

Berico Technologies

Mr. Carl Solomon

Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer

Entegra Systems

Mr. Patrick Warfle

Deputy Director of Military Support

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency 

8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

THE TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANTAGE

Overview

Emerging technologies have the potential to significantly and positively improve the ability of the IC to conduct its analytic mission. With limited fiscal resources, it will be a critical to vet these technologies carefully before selecting one for use and then insightfully develop and integrate it into the IC analytic process.

Focus Questions

  • What are the most prominent technologies that can improve the IC analytic capability?
  • How and where can these technologies be used to improve IC analytic production?
  • What impediments, technologically and otherwise, exist that would prevent the use of these technologies by the IC.
  • Does the IC need to develop a new vision to incorporate these technologies?

Speakers

The Honorable James Simon

Chief Strategist, Worldwide Public Sector

Microsoft

Mr. Simon served at CIA for nearly three decades, much of that time as a senior analyst.  After Mr. Simon retired from government, he joined Microsoft where he now helps governments around the world solve complex problems drawing on Microsoft technology and capabilities. 

Mr. George Spix

Architect

Microsoft Institute for Advanced Technology in Governments

Microsoft Corporation

Mr. Spix helps to focus Microsoft on the challenges governments and large institutions face in adopting advanced technology, and to help those organizations bring new technologies into practice. 

9:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

BREAK AND EXHIBITS

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10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  

SESSION THREE : INNOVATIONS IN ANALYSIS AND ANALYTICS

Overview

How can the U.S. best leverage current multi-INT operational dynamics, decision advantage imperatives and driving budget efficiencies to finally achieve a cutting edge and efficient integrated analytics environment for the IC?  This session will explore how the IC can implement creative, affordable, and implementable visionary architectures and approaches for conducting in depth and operational intelligence analysis.  Many of today’s commercially driven technologies can enable entirely new CONOPs and analytic tradecraft excellence never before achieved. In other cases, the need to seriously conserve resources will drive the IC to target enterprise approaches to access and process data, conduct analysis and deliver intelligence. An industry role, beyond merely providing infrastructure, in support of this transformation is critical as the IC migrates from proprietary approaches and technologies to commercial approaches.

Focus Questions

  • What potentially high impact innovations should be leveraged to raise the bar in capability and efficiency in IC analytic mission processes and training techniques to address the mission drivers and investment outlook?
  • If you could redesign the IC's analytic mission, what would you propose?

Co-Chairs

Maj Gen Robert Latiff, Ph.D., USAF (Ret)

Director, Intelligence and Security Research Center

George Mason University 

Ms. Terry. Roberts

Executive Director Interagency and Cyber

SEI Carnegie Mellon University - FFRDC

Speakers

Dr. Matthew Gaston

Director, Cyber Innovation Center

Adjunct Associate Professor, Institute for Software Research

Carnegie Mellon University

The Cyber Innovation Center demonstrates and transitions edge-of-technology capabilities in the computing and information sciences for critical government cyber and intelligence missions.  Before joining Carnegie Mellon, Dr. Gaston was the Director of Research for a business unit of General Dynamics C4 Systems and spent nearly 10 years at the National Security Agency developing and applying mission-focused analytics.

Ms. Christina Morrell

Director/Social Media Program Office

Office of the Director of National Intelligence/Open Source Center

The Open Source Center (OSC) is the US Government's premier provider of foreign open source intelligence. OpenSource.gov provides information on foreign political, military, economic, and technical issues, contains sources from more than 160 countries in more than 80 languages, and hosts content from several commercial providers, as well as content from OSC partners.

Mr. Mark Riccio

Strategic Initiative Executive for Disaster Support

National Geospatial-Intelligence

Mr. Riccio is responsible for providing content, processing, and application services to NGA’s emergency preparedness, response and recovery mission partners, enabling self-service and online/on-demand access to timely, relevant GEOINT, including user-created data and applications. 

Ms. Jill Singer

Chief Information Officer

National Reconnaissance Office

Prior to joining the NRO, Ms. Singer served as the Deputy CIO for the Central Intelligence Agency.  She also was the Director of the Diplomatic Telecommunications Service (DTS), United States Department of State and the head of Systems Engineering, Architecture, and Planning for CIA’s global infrastructure organization. Ms. Singer additionally served as the Director of Architecture and Implementation for the Intelligence Community CIO and pioneered the technology and management concepts that are the basis for multi-agency secure collaboration.

11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

LUNCH AND EXHIBITS

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1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

SESSION FOUR: INVESTING FOR SUCCESS 

Overview

In an era of declining resources, analytic investments must carefully consider resource allocations in other disciplines.  Achieving the right balance between collection, processing, exploitation, analysis, and personnel is critical and raises significant questions.  Will analysis be increasingly outsourced or will outsourcing be abandoned in favor of sustaining the government analytic workforce?  What is the right balance between investments in personnel training and development, development of next generation data mining, or in evolving proven tools and techniques for exploiting information sources and holdings?  In this concluding session, representatives of the principal analytic agencies will discuss their plans for addressing these questions in the context of the looming budget reductions and the rapid evolution of commercial tools and practices.     

Focus Questions

  • What is the portfolio mix of investments that offer the greatest leverage to ensure effective, timely, and relevant analysis?
  • What is the strategy for employing industry to support the analytic mission, and will outsourcing of analysis continue, increase, or decrease?
  • What investments should industry make to meet the future needs of the government’s analytic community?
  • Are there potential “breakthrough” investments being considered that might offer transformational enhancements in analytic capability?
  • What investment areas will most likely be increased, sustained, or reduced?

Co-Chairs

Mr. Tom Conroy

Consultant

Ms. Linda Millis

Director, Private Sector Partnerships

Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Speakers

Ms. Jennifer Lasley

Vice Deputy Director for Analysis

Defense Intelligence Agency

Ms. Lasley has served in a variety of analytic, collection, and leadership positions in the Intelligence community.  In her current position, she is responsible for over 4,000 intelligence professionals tasked with the production of all-source military intelligence required to develop and execute the National Security Strategy. 

Mr. Wayne Murphy

Deputy Director for Analysis and Production

National Security Agency

Mr. Murphy oversees NSA’s analytic production and the allocation of resources to meet operational demands. 

Ms. Lisa Spuria

Director Analysis & Production

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Mr. Roger Sternitzke

Deputy Director of the Office of Corporate Resources Director for Talent Management

Directorate of Intelligence

Central Intelligence Agency

Mr. Sternitzke is responsible for corporate programs aimed at supporting the growth and development of the DI’s analytic workforce.

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK

2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

STRATEGIC IMPERATIVES: WARFIGHTER PERSPECTIVES

General James Cartwright, USMC (Ret.)

Former Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

The inaugural Harold Brown Chair in Defense Policy Studies

Center for Strategic and International Studies

Overview

Our nation's intelligence terrain continues to change in dramatic ways as we drawdown combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, address the risks and opportunities associated with democracy movements in the Middle East and Africa, continue to fight worldwide terrorism, and respond to cyber threats – all while intelligence and national security budgets are dramatically decreasing. 

 

Focus Questions

  • How can intelligence analysis better support the warfighter and national level decision maker?
  • Where should IC resources most effectively be focused given declining budgets?
  • What are your expectations of intelligence analysis regarding cyber warfare?
  • What do you see as the appropriate role for Industry as a partner in enhancing IC analytics?

 

3:45 p.m.

SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP

Symposium Co-Chairs