AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND EXHIBITS

Sponsored by

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

AFCEA WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

 

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS' WELCOME

Mr. Collin Agee

Senior Advisor for IC Engagement

Headquarters, Department of the Army

 

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Executive Vice President

National Solutions Group

CACI International, Inc.

 

Lt Gen Bruce Wright, USAF (Ret.)

Vice President, C4ISR

Lockheed Martin Corporation

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

LESSONS LEARNED AND LOOKING AHEAD

Overview

Over the past decade, the Intelligence Community, and Defense Intelligence in particular, has responded to demands that fundamentally altered priorities, development and employment of capabilities, personnel career patterns, skill development and application, and many other factors.  The focus has been on counter insurgency and counter terrorism operations with an emphasis on support and augmentation forward.  The post-Afghanistan security environment, however, will present a widely divergent range of challenges to the United States military and Defense Intelligence.  In this changing security environment, conventional military advantages alone will not ensure our strategic success.  DIA Director Michael Flynn will address the lessons the Intelligence Community has learned in the last decade and how it should be preparing for the challenges ahead.

Focus Questions

  • What lessons learned from Afghanistan carry forward to the future?  What challenges require new thinking?
  • What requirements are driving DIA’s planning and how have they been prioritized?
  • Looking to the future, where should we focus on tradecraft and technology,  what are the greatest opportunities and  how can industry help?

Speaker

LTG Michael Flynn, USA

Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

LTG Flynn is the Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency.  In addition to responsibilities within the National Intelligence Community, he leads an agency with global mission requirements and has responsibilities for resourcing and planning for a DoD enterprise composed of DIA, Service Intelligence Centers and the J-2’s at the Combatant Commands.

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

THE DNI'S PERSPECTIVE

Overview

The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) position was created based on the recommendations of 9/11 Commission, which questioned the efficacy of the structure of the Intelligence Community to protect US national and homeland security interests against attacks by foreign terrorists.  In this session, the DNI will assess the continuous evolution of the threat, the progress made toward addressing the shortfalls identified by the 9/11 Commission, and his vision for the future of the IC.  He will discuss the recent or ongoing studies and initiatives undertaken by the DNI to achieve Integration and keep ahead of current and future threats.  As the culminating session of this symposium, the DNI will offer his views on the challenges facing the IC that we have discussed in previous sessions, his plan of attack, and where he needs help.  

Focus Questions

  • After an extended period of focus and support to the warfighter  in a counterinsurgency effort, is the IC appropriately balanced between strategic, operational and tactical intelligence?
  • What are the enduring intelligence lessons learned from Iraq and Afghanistan?
  • How does the IC need to reorient to address future threats?
  • Where does the IC need help from Industry?

Speaker

The Honorable James Clapper

Director of National Intelligence

10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

BREAK AND EXHIBITS

10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

SESSION ONE: ON WAR: CONTINUITY, CHANGE AND CHALLENGES

Overview

Carl von Clausewitz defined war as, “an act of force to compel our enemy to do our will."  The evolving U.S. national security challenges feature elusive adversaries and difficult missions, in which decisive results and clearly defined end states are difficult to achieve.  This session will examine the future challenges for the United States which has faced more than a decade of counterinsurgency and an enduring threat from terrorism.  The speakers will consider whether the projected landscape represents a permanent change in the threats to national security and the degree to which national defense must be balanced along the full spectrum of threats. 

Focus Questions

  • Is the enduring Nature of War a constant or are we experiencing a significant shift to a new state of punctuated equilibrium, one in which we must contend with ongoing non-traditional threats while still facing the distant but very real potential for major armed conflict in other parts of the world?
  • Are the principal competitors changing from nation-states to non-state actors? 
  • In an age characterized by global terrorism, cyber operations and the prospect of WMD proliferation, how will we contend with threats that do not meet the definition of War?

Session Chair

Col Herbert Kemp, USAF (Ret.)

President and CEO

OneAlpha Corporation

Speakers

Col Mark Altobelli, USAF

Directorate of Plans

Headquarters United States Air Force

In his current position, Colonel Altobelli leads a cross functional analysis organization on the Air Staff responsible for development of strategic initiatives. Colonel Altobelli, is a career fighter pilot, having previously commanded the 609th Air and Space Operations Center in Southwest Asia and the 35th Operations Group, Misawa AB, Japan.

Mr. David Fastabend

Vice President

Advanced Information Systems

Exelis Information Systems

General Fastabend is the former Director, Strategic Operations, United States Army.  Prior to that, he served as the Director of Strategic Operations, Multinational Forces, Iraq.  General Fastabend joins this panel as a strategist with numerous published articles to is name on various topics related to strategy.  

Mr. Bruce B. Stubbs, SES
Deputy Director, Strategy and Policy Division

OPNAV Staff

12:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

LUNCH AND EXHIBITS

Sponsored by

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

SESSION TWO: THE WARFIGHTING PERSPECTIVE: PLANNING IMPERATIVES AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENCE

Overview

This session will address how the requirements and planning processes have been used to successfully (or unsuccessfully) fulfill warfighting commanders’ needs across the array of mission areas, to include combat, civil support and cyber.  Speakers will explore how processes can become more agile, responsive and effective in meeting operational forces’ future needs.  They will discuss future intelligence requirements, as well as convey lessons learned from their recent operational and planning experiences.  At the end of this session, attendees will have greater insights into how COCOMs, the Services, the Joint Staff, and industry can more rapidly fill emerging intelligence gaps.

 

Focus Questions

  • After more than a decade of largely decentralized, tactical operations, is the Intelligence Community postured to provide the appropriate balance of strategic and tactical intelligence?
  • In a future environment, with potentially reduced resources, what do you forecast will be the most critical intelligence challenges (e.g., strategic or tactical HUMINT, national or tactical sensor availability, processing and dissemination or exploitation and analysis)?
  • From a combatant command perspective, what are the intelligence gaps in assessing the cyber threat and the subsequent needs for combatant and component command planning and response?

Session Chair

VADM Jack Dorsett, USN (Ret.)

Vice President for Cyber and C4 Programs

Northrop Grumman

Session Speakers  

Rear Admiral Samuel J. Cox, U.S. Navy

Director, National Maritime Intelligence Integration Office

Commander, Office of Naval Intelligence

Naval Intelligence Community Leader

As the Navy’s senior intelligence officer, Rear Admiral Cox leads the Navy’s intelligence professionals, and is responsible for the U.S. Navy’s intelligence analysis, collections and technical capabilities.  He also reports to the Director of National Intelligence for integrating maritime intelligence activities across U.S. government agencies.  Prior to this tour he was the Director of Intelligence (J2), U.S. Cyber Command.  Throughout his career he has served in key intelligence leadership and command positions in numerous crises and conflicts, to include Desert Storm, Haiti, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq, and headed the Multi-national Intelligence Task Force investigating the sinking of South Korea’s warship Cheonan.

RDML Michael Hewitt, USN

Deputy Director, Special Programs Cross Functional Team

The Joint Staff

RDML Hewitt is currently responsible to the Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff for overseeing and managing all special access programs support to the combatant commanders, interagency and national command authority.  A career naval aviator, he previously served as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group.   He also served as the assistant deputy director for Information Operations in the Operations Directorate (J3), Joint Staff.

 

Maj Gen Michael Keltz, USAF

Director, Strategic Planning and Policy (J5)

U.S. Pacific Command

Maj Gen Keltz is a career aviator who has commanded a special operations squadron, a special mission group in Iraq and Afghanistan, and has flow combat and contingency operations in Grenada, El Salvador, Panama, Sierra Leone and in operations Desert Storm and Provide Comfort.  As the U.S defense strategy reorients toward the Pacific Command area of responsibility (AOR), Gen Keltz leads multiple activities and initiatives to develop policy and comprehensive operational plans to promote regional security and be prepared to respond to the full spectrum  of military contingencies to ensure Asia-Pacific stability and security.

3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

DESSERT BREAK

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

AIR SEA BATTLE AND THE PIVOT TO ASIA

Overview

This session will focus on the planning and employment challenges inherent in the East Asia and Pacific AOR, including the unique aspects of intelligence requirements and coalition operations across the spectrum of military operations.   Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) challenges, coupled with long distances, basing access issues, and ever-evolving changes in US mil-to-mil relationships in the Pacific region, drive unique 24/7 C4ISR requirements and the need for industry to better understand the strategic, operational, and tactical elements of “Air/Sea Battle.” 

Focus Questions

  • In the context of joint air operations, what are the top three intelligence/ISR requirements that are critical to effective planning and operations?
  • What are the challenges for effective air component C2 and what are the associated technology gaps?
  • How can industry best support “Air Sea Battle” C4ISR requirements?

Speaker

Lt Gen Burton Field, USAF

Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Plans and Requirements

Headquarters U.S. Air Force

General Burton is responsible to the Secretary of the Air Force and the Chief of Staff for formulating policy supporting air, space, irregular warfare, counterproliferation, homeland security, weather and cyber operations.  As the Air Force operations deputy to the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he determines operational requirements, capabilities and training necessary to support national security objectives and military strategy.  General Field is a command pilot with more than 3,400 flying hours in the F-16 and the F-22A.  He deployed as Commander, 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing, Balad AB, Iraq.

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. 

NETWORKING RECEPTION AND EXHIBITS

Sponsored by



 


THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND EXHIBITS

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS' WELCOME

Mr. Collin Agee

Senior Advisor for IC Engagement

Headquarters, Department of the Army

 

VADM Lowell Jacoby, USN (Ret.)

Executive Vice President

National Solutions Group

CACI International, Inc.

 

Lt Gen Bruce Wright, USAF (Ret.)

Vice President, C4ISR

Lockheed Martin Corporation

8:45 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

SESSION THREE: THE ROLE OF COMBAT SUPPORT AGENCIES IN AN ERA OF CHANGE

Overview

In this session, the Combat Support Agencies will address how they are prepared to meet the requirements of future wars, particularly in light of how those challenges will differ from the past.  They will highlight the core competencies of their agencies, while simultaneously addressing the synergies to be gained by integration across the Community.  Taking stock of the significant changes of the past decade, they will describe their plans for continued evolution to meet the challenges of the future, as identified in previous sessions.  They will identify where they need help from industry, mindful of the constrained resource environment. 

Focus Questions

  • Following a decade in which "support to the warfighter" has been paramount, what does your agency need to do to adapt to a more diverse set of mission requirements in the future? 
  • In light of the recent DNI study on Multi-INT, how are the individual agencies contributing to the DNI’s overarching goal of greater integration? 
  • Faced with a shrinking budget, what new initiatives are underway in your agency to realize greater efficiencies and effectiveness? What help do you need from industry and academia?  Where should the IC focus and where should they take risks? What are the big three issues that keep you up at night as you deal with this changing environment of increasing demand and reduced budgets?

Session Chair

LTG Robert Noonan, Jr., USA (Ret.)

Senior Vice President

Booz Allen Hamilton

Session Speakers

GEN Keith B. Alexander, USA

Commander, U.S. Cyber Command

Director, National Security Agency

Chief, Central Security Service

 

Ms. Letitia Long

Director

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Mr. David Shedd

Deputy Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK AND EXHIBITS

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

AMERICA'S GLOBAL SECURITY CHALLENGES

Overview

As the Vice Chief of Staff of the US Army, GEN Keane witnessed the change that is the subject of this symposium up close and personal from his office in the Pentagon on 9/11.  He experienced considerable change during 37 years of uniform service, and applies that experience as chairman of the Institute for the Study of War, whose mission is to “advance an informed understanding of military affairs through reliable research, trusted analysis, and innovative education."  His presentation will consider how the nature of war has changed, what those changes portend for the nation and, from an operator's perspective, how the demand for intelligence is changing in pursuance of national security.

Focus Questions

  • Having commanded both the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and the 18th Airborne Corps, what is your assessment of our posture to respond to contingencies?  How will these contingencies be similar or different than

    those you experienced in Vietnam, Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia and Kosovo?

  • How did intelligence support to the warfighter change during your career? What changes are needed to meet future threats?

  • How do non-traditional threats impact national security?  What are the implications for our national strategy and the requisite intelligence support?

Speaker

Gen. Jack Keane, USA (Ret.)

Chairman

Institute of the Study of War (ISW)

11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

LUNCH AND EXHIBITS

Sponsored by

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.  

SESSION FOUR: PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE: INTELLIGENCE TECHNOLOGY AND INVESTMENT

 

Overview

The final session will examine the likely impact of technology on future warfare.  It remains to be seen if and how current intelligence technology optimized for support to tactical operations in permissive environments can be redirected towards more strategic intelligence warning and assessment where access needs to be established and relevant information is well protected.  Declining costs and increasing access to technology are also eroding the IC’s historic collection and analytic advantages which threatens the ability of U.S. commanders to know more about the battle space sooner than their counterparts.  The goal of this session is to better understand what investments the IC needs to be making now in technology so we are not surprised by the changes in the future nature of conflict.

Focus Questions

  • Is the IC appropriately organized and funded to collect and analyze Scientific and Technical Intelligence (S&TI) to ensure the superiority of U.S. defense and intelligence systems against likely future adversaries’ capabilities?
  • Can technology improve the seemingly enduring imbalance between “vacuum cleaner” IC collection capabilities and IC “processing, exploitation, analysis, and dissemination (PED) capacity?  Is our investment appropriately balanced between collection and PED?
  • What metrics should the IC be using to rationalize and justify how and why it is investing certain technologies but not others?

Session Chair

CAPT Joseph Mazzafro, USN (Ret.)

Director for Customer Outreach

Military Intelligence and Information Operations

Computer Sciences Corporation

 

Session Speakers

Mr. Max Boot

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies

Council on Foreign Relations

Mr. Boot is a widely published military historian.  He is the author of the widely read and acclaimed The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power as well as War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History, 1500 to Today.  His newest book, Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present was released this past January.

VADM Jack Dorsett, USN (Ret.)

Vice President for Cyber and C4 Programs

Northrop Grumman

 

Mr. Jeff Jonas

Chief Scientist of the IBM Entity Analytics group and an IBM Fellow

In addition to his duties at IBM, Mr. Jonas is also a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.  Mr. Jonas is renowned for the design and development of a number of extraordinary systems including the technology used by the surveillance arm of the gaming industry that the Intelligence Community came to adopt through an early In-Q-Tel investment. 

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK

2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

THE NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE: PLANNING IMPERATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENCE

 

Overview

Much is changing in the strategic landscape with disengagement in Afghanistan, a changing set of imperatives in the Middle East and South Asia, a pivot to the Pacific, a focus on air/sea operations and other concepts such as hybrid operations.  These changes are occurring as the fiscal environment undergoes one of the most significant resets since the end of World War II. With the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence at the epicenter of many of these changing dynamics and pressures, Mr. Kevin Meiners will provide his insights into the key planning elements and how they will  meet the anticipated demands. 

Focus Questions

  • What is the appropriate mix between human collection, technical collection, analysis, and supporting services as you look to the future?  How will that future differ from more than a decade of largely tactical support to warfighters in a COIN environment?
  • Which technologies and capabilities are most important and where can industry help?
  • How will you integrate NIP and MIP funded activities and DOD and IC capabilities into a plan to meet your requirements?

Speaker

Mr. Kevin Meiners

Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Portfolio, Programs and Resources

Mr. Meiners oversees the process of translating military requirements for intelligence into systems that deliver capabilities.  On the heels of more than a decade focused on support to ongoing operations of a specific nature, the OUSD(I) must determine what capabilities are enduring and where to focus to meet future threats.  The nature of war and those threats are determining factors for programmatics during a period of declining resources. 

3:45 p.m.

SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP

Symposium Co-Chairs