AGENDA

THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND EXHIBITS

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

AFCEA WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International 


8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW

VADM Jack Dorsett, USN (Ret.)

Vice President for Integrated Mission Systems

Northrop Grumman

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

TURNING DATA INTO DECISIONS

Speaker

General Robert Kehler, USAF (Ret.)

Former Commander, U.S. Strategic Command

General Kehler retired from the United States Air Force on January 1, 2014.  His last duty assignment was as the Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. In this position, he provided the President and Secretary of Defense with a broad range of strategic capabilities and options for the joint warfighter through several diverse mission areas, including combating weapons of mass destruction, integrated missile defense, ISR, and global strike. He was responsible for the plans and operations for all U.S. forces conducting strategic deterrence and DoD space and cyberspace operations.

Overview

General Kehler will discuss how senior executives use a wide array of information to prepare for the variety of daily national security decisions that are made at the highest levels of the U.S. government. He will recount what he has found to be best practices for sorting through and understanding information, as well as those practices he has found less successful.   He also will also provide recommendations regarding how the government and industry might best prepare to use large volumes of data in the years ahead.  At the end of this session, the audience will have gained unique insights into how large volumes of information are accessed and used by senior members of the U.S. government and the warfighting community to inform and shape their decision-making.

Focus Questions 

  • In a world of rapidly evolving technology, a growing legion of cyber warriors from nation states and private groups, and a very diverse 21st century threat; what changes-if any-do we need to make to ensure we can meet our national security challenges?
  • How did you successfully handle the transition from an era in which the Intelligence Community (IC) was focused largely on finite amounts of highly classified data, to today’s environment of ubiquitous access to a multitude of classified and unclassified sources of information?
  • Has the IC kept pace with the open market in how it accesses, manipulates and uses big data?  What recommendations do you have regarding how the IC should continue to evolve to be able to master “big data”?

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

TECHNOLOGY, INNOVATION, AND THE FUTURE OF U.S. INTELLIGENCE

Speaker

Mr. Ralph Osterhout

Osterhout Design Group

From the world of high tech military gadgetry to innovative toys and consumer products, Mr. Osterhout is a master at ingeniously infusing anything he touches with technology. As the founder of a multitude of successful companies, he brings a business model and creed that is as unique and remarkable as his product history. He regularly ricochets between advanced military devices to underwater gadgets to interactive toys that annoy. His clients range from companies such as Mattel, Hasbro, and Tiger Electronics while products such as his Tekna flashlights persist as coveted keepsakes and internet lore. He is often referred to as the quintessential renaissance man but his transformative approach to product invention more accurately brands him a product prophesier.  

Overview

The Intelligence Community has long benefited from technological advances that originated both from internal R&D investments and also from relationships with industry, the civil sector and academia.  During his career Mr. Osterhout has developed a range of products spanning toys, consumer electronics, dive equipment, furniture to devices for the Department of Defense.  He brings to the symposium unique lessons and perspectives that are directly applicable to the U.S. government.  In this session, he will share his insights into how members of the IC and industry may be able to prepare to be more effective in a data-intensive environment.

Focus Questions 

  • What game-changing technological breakthroughs do you envision over the next decade?   Which of these are most likely to have the greatest impact on the U.S. Intelligence Community?   Is the IC prepared to take advantage of these opportunities?
  • How can the IC better leverage the technological achievements of the civil sector?
  • Where should the individual intelligence agencies invest their finite R&D funds?

10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK AND EXHIBITS

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 noon

SESSION ONE: BIG DATA AND KNOWLEDGE CREATION – TECHNOLOGY AND TRADECRAFT

Overview 

Speakers in this session will address how the fundamentals of intelligence tradecraft are evolving with the introduction of new tools and techniques.  Speakers include government and industry professionals and technologists who are charged with mining big data for valuable intelligence to drive operational and policy-making successes.  An examination of the underlying promise of these new technologies, tempered by an awareness of their limitations, will give the audience a better understanding of how intelligence tradecraft will be impacted. Speakers will discuss their experiences and provide insights into how current big data technology and tradecraft have contributed to mission success.  At the end of this session, the audience will have a better understanding of current capabilities, as well as insight into what additional requirements remain unfulfilled. 

Focus Questions

  • How is the traditional intelligence cycle evolving, and what fundamentals become more important in the era of big data?
  • What does big data allow us to do today, that was not possible a few years ago?  What dramatic improvements should be expected over the next few years, and is the IC prepared for the transformation?
  • What are the technologies involved in today’s collection/acquisition, storage, and analysis/utilization of big data and how will/do they fit into today’s IC IT enterprise? What’s next and what will its further impact be on intelligence tradecraft?

Session Co-Chairs

CAPT Mark Greer, USN (Ret.)

Senior Vice President

Invertix Corporation  

Mr. Lewis Shepherd

Director, Microsoft Institute

Microsoft Corporation 

Session Speakers

Mr. Chris D’Agostino

President and Chief Technology Officer

Altamira Technologies Corporation 

Mr. D'Agostino, has been a technology leader in the Intelligence Community (IC) for more than a decade. In his role at Altamira, he has been directly involved with building cloud-based enterprise and big data applications across a wide range of IC and DoD organizations. Mr. D’Agostino founded Reston-based enterprise software development firm Near Infinity Corporation in 2002, delivering both products and services to the IC. As CEO, he ran the growing, profitable company for 10 years and oversaw a successful exit with the investor backing, forming half of what is now Altamira Technologies Corporation.

Mr. Rich Hoch

Deputy Director for Intelligence

Central Intelligence Agency

Mr. Hoch was named Deputy Director for Intelligence in May 2010.  Prior to this assignment, he served in the Office of South Asia Analysis, the CIA’s Counterterrorism Center, and units covering arms transfers and conventional weapons.  He joined the Agency in 1991 after serving for seven years in the private sector as an aerospace engineer.  

Mr. Skip McCormick

Data Scientist

Central Intelligence Agency

Mr. McCormick is one of the leading Data Science practitioners in the U.S. Intelligence Community, and over the past decade has pioneered analytic and mission use of Big Data in counter-terrorism and other domains at the Central Intelligence Agency, which he joined after working on large-scale IC systems as part of MITRE’s Senior Technical Staff. He is a  U.S. Naval Academy graduate and has lectured at George Mason University on “Leadership in Big Data Intelligence.

Mr. Eric Velez-Villar

Assistant Director, Directorate of Intelligence

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Mr. Velez-Villar entered on duty with the FBI in 1985 in the San Juan Division. In 1992, he became a special agent and was assigned to the San Antonio Division, where he worked organized crime and drug matters. Mr. Velez-Villar then returned to the San Juan Division, where he investigated public corruption cases.  He returned as a supervisory special agent at FBI Headquarters in 2000, where he was detailed to the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Special Operations Division. Mr. Velez-Villar coordinated major drug trafficking investigations throughout the U.S.  In 2002, he transferred to the Los Angeles Division. He supervised organized crime and drug matters and the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF). In 2004, he was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of the Los Angeles Division’s counterterrorism program.  Mr. Velez-Villar also co-chaired the Area Maritime Security Committee with the U.S. Coast Guard captain of the port and was responsible for securing the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, the nation’s two largest seaports. He also served as co-chair of the Airport Security Advisory Committee, responsible for the security of Los Angeles International Airport as well as the airports in Burbank, Ontario, and Van Nuys, California.  Two years later, Mr. Velez-Villar was promoted to deputy director of the FBI’s Terrorist Screening Center in Washington, D.C. In 2008, Velez-Villar was appointed as the first special agent in charge of the Los Angeles Division’s newly created Intelligence Division.

12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m.

LUNCH AND EXHIBITS  

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

SESSION TWO: DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES AND INVESTMENT PRIORITIES IN A FISCALLY-CONSTRAINED ENVIRONMENT

 

Session Co-Chairs

Mr. Scott Large

Director

Deloitte Consulting, LLP 

Ms. Michele Weslander Quaid

Chief Technology Officer (Public Sector)

Innovation Evangelist

Google, Inc. 

Overview

The IC has perpetually been in the position of having more collected data than it can analyze. The volume at which data is collected today creates a significant dilemma: maintaining the capacity to process and understand what is already collected while dealing with a continuous deluge of new collection.  As computing capabilities and algorithms evolve, the IC has the opportunity to harness big data analytics to provide critical insight. In addition, information is being openly shared by non-traditional sources, which provide additional insight and context. The big data era presents opportunities for the IC to gain access to, employ, and understand, data in unique and transformative ways using both evolving and disruptive technologies. Speakers in this session will discuss the value of utilizing non-traditional sources and new technologies that are advantageous for the IC to pursue, and compare this how the IC is presently prioritizing finite R&D resources and how investments may need to change. By the end of this session, the audience will have a better understanding of how to apply non-traditional sources and disruptive technologies to support the IC mission, and how better to prioritize R&D investments.

Focus Questions

  • What game-changing technologies exist today that we should expect to see introduced as part of the mainstream of the IC this decade?
  • What can the IC do to incentivize industry’s investments in new technologies?
  • What are the near-term R&D investment priorities for the Intelligence Community?
  • How might these investment priorities shift as new technologies are introduced to the IC?
  • Do these technologies lead the analytic tradecraft or does the tradecraft lead the technology?

Session Speakers

Dr. Christopher Ahlberg

CEO and Founder

Recorded Future

In addition to being the CEO of Recorded Future, Inc., Dr. Ahlberg is the Chairman of Hult International Business School. He also advises a series of startup companies. Earlier Dr. Ahlberg was the president of the Spotfire Division of TIBCO, which he founded in 1996 and in 2007 sold to TIBCO. Spotfire was founded based on his ground-breaking research on information visualization. He has lectured and consulted extensively for industry, academia, military, and intelligence communities - as well as published, lectured, and briefed  in computer science, cyber security, intelligence,  psychology, linguistics, biology, and chemistry. He has four granted software patents, and multiple pending. Dr. Ahlberg was named among the World's Top 100 Young Innovators by Technology Review, MIT's Magazine of Innovation in 2002.

Mr. Guy Filippelli

Chief Executive Officer and President

RedOwl Analytics, LLC.

Guy Filippelli is the CEO of RedOwl Analytics, a Baltimore-based company applying big-data analytics towards security, compliance and management.  RedOwl’s software helps organizations transform their digital exhaust from a liability to an asset through rigorous data science and powerful visual workflow.  Guy is from Cleveland, Ohio, is a West Point & Oxford graduate, a former Army intelligence officer, and successful CEO. In 2007, he was awarded the National Intelligence Medallion for his efforts in Iraq.  He is Chairman of the Commit Foundation, and a Council on Foreign Relations term member. 

Mr. Glenn Gaffney

Deputy Director for Science and Technology

Central Intelligence Agency

The Directorate of Science and Technology (DS&T) is one of four major components whose employees carry out the CIA's mission. The organization attacks national intelligence problems with effective targeting, bold technology and superb tradecraft. They create, adapt, develop, and operate technical collection systems and apply enabling technologies to the collection, processing, and analysis of information. All DS&T employees are technical intelligence officers, but work in many different disciplines ranging from computer programmers and engineers to scientists and analysts.  The DS&T partners with many other organizations in the Intelligence Community, the military, academia, the national laboratories, and the private sector to achieve mission success. 

Mr. Abe Usher

Chief Technology Officer

HumanGEO

Abe Usher, Chief Technology Officer at the HumanGeo Group, has 18 years of professional experience related to software engineering and system development. Prior to co-founding HumanGeo, Abe was a senior engineer within Google’s Enterprise Division where he worked on geospatial and search technology in support of Google Earth and Google Maps. His other areas of specialty at Google were large scale data mining and quantitative social network analysis. Prior to Google, he also has served in a number of government roles with the National Security Agency (NSA) and the US Army. Abe is a Cloudera Certified Hadoop Professional (CCHP), and Certified Information System Security Professional (CISSP).

3:00-3:15 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK  

3:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

PRESENTATION OF THE 2013 CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED INTELLIGENCE SERVICE 

Ms. Maureen Baginski

Chair

AFCEA Intelligence Committee 

3:30 - 4:15 p.m.

THE CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD RECIPIENT ADDRESS 

Mr. David Shedd

Deputy Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

Mr. Shedd was named Deputy Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency in August 2010. In this capacity, he assists the Director's management of a workforce with more than 16,500 military and civilian employees worldwide and his leadership of the Defense Intelligence Enterprise—Defense Intelligence Community organizations within the Department of Defense with an intelligence mission and/or function, plus all their stakeholders involved in creating, sustaining and enhancing mission capacity.

4:15 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. 

NETWORKING RECEPTION


________________________________________________________  

FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014

 

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND EXHIBITS

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

ADMINISTRATIVE ANNOUNCEMENTS

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International 

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

WELCOME

LTG Robert Noonan, Jr., USA (Ret.)

Senior Vice President

Booz Allen Hamilton 

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

USING DATA & INTELLIGENCE TO HELP INFORM NATIONAL DECISIONS

The Honorable Thad Allen, Admiral, USCG (Ret.)

Executive Vice President

Booz Allen Hamilton

ADM Allen is a leader in the firm’s Departments of Justice and Homeland Security business in the civil market. He leads the development of thought leadership and client engagement regarding the future direction of law enforcement and homeland security. He is known for his expertise in bringing together government and non-government entities to address major challenges in a “whole of government” approach designed to achieve a unity of effort. Mr. Allen completed his distinguished career in the US Coast Guard as its 23rd Commandant.  In 2010, President Barack Obama selected Mr. Allen to serve as the National Incident Commander for the unified response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Overview 

Admiral Allen will use examples from his personal experiences to explain how vital intelligence is to today’s warfighters and policy-makers.  He also will discuss how he as commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard balanced the use of formal intelligence briefings, assessments and data, with information obtained from other classified and open sources.  At the end of this session, the audience will have a better understanding of the information needs of senior U.S. decision-makers.     

Focus Questions

  • What sources of information were most valuable to you?  Were there unclassified, open sources that were particularly valuable?
  • Were there any information management tools that you, or your intelligence team used, that were particularly helpful in sifting and sorting data and turning it into useful analysis and assessments?

9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

SESSION THREE: PREPARING FOR THE ANALYTICAL WORKFORCE OF THE FUTURE

Overview

The work force of tomorrow is likely to be educated and trained using fundamentally different tools and processes than those available today.  Classroom lectures are already being replaced with on-line environments, using advanced simulations and tools. Leveraging social media to collaborate is a fundamental part of the educational experience today. In addition to new teaching methods, educational curriculums are evolving that are specifically focused on big data analytics, cyber intelligence, and multi-int intelligence analysis.  This session’s speakers will discuss the array of emerging patterns, tools, techniques, and applied intel analysis disciplines being introduced to create unique learning environments for the emerging work force.  At the end of this session, the audience will have a better understanding of how learning/training is evolving in and outside of government, and which capabilities are most likely to influence the direction of training within the IC over the next decade.

Focus Questions

  • What new educational paradigms, tools and techniques are having the greatest impact on training IC analysts, technicians, scientists, operators, and managers?
  • What are the greatest challenges intelligence analysts face today and what needs to be done to support them (e.g., career mentoring/coaching, do more with less, multi-tasking expectations)?
  • What role can industry play in helping the IC to evolve its training capabilities?

 

Session Co-Chairs

Ms. Sandra Forney

Operations and Planning Director, Cyber Solutions Division

Northrop Grumman Information Systems 

Ms. Lynn Schnurr

Vice President, Defense Intelligence

General Dynamics 

Session Speakers

Ms. Renee Angevine

Acting Senior Intelligence Analyst Shia Threats Branch

Defense Combating Terrorism Center

Defense Intelligence Agency

As an analyst for the Defense Combating Terrorism Center , Ms. Angevine  has deployed in support of the Special Forces in Afghanistan, served as a desk officer in the 24/7 Warning Fusion Center, and performed several rotations in support of the joint staff and executive support office at the Pentagon. She received the 2013 DIA Director’s 43rd Annual Honorary Team Award, the 2012 National Intelligence Certificate of Distinction Team Award, and was nominated for the 2012 William R. Shaw award for Analytic Excellence in Counterterrorism Analysis.

Ms. Sandy Brooks

Senior Technical Advisor to Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance,

Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) N2/N6 and Joint Interagency Task Force South

In 2001 Ms. Brooks assumed command of the Kunia Regional Security Operations Command (KRSOC) Hawaii, concurrently serving as the KRSOC Commander, Commanding Officer of Naval Security Group Activity Kunia, and base host to seven tenant commands, leading a cadre of over 2,500 Joint Service military and civilian personnel in providing national, operational and tactical information operations support. She then served as the Deputy Chief of Intelligence and Security as well as the Chief of the Joint Interagency Intelligence Operations Center at the Joint Interagency Task Force South until her retirement from active duty in 2007.  

Mr. Ray Kinard

Director

Cyber Academy

Northrop Grumman Information Systems

Mr. Kinard has responsibility for the design, development and delivery of sector and enterprise-wide cyber learning and development initiatives, for internal Northrop Grumman participants and employees, as well as clients and potential clients.

Ms. Katherine Hibbs Pherson

Chief Executive Officer

Pherson Associates, LLC

10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

NETWORKING BREAK AND EXHIBITS 

11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

BALANCING PRIVACY, CIVIL LIBERTIES AND NATIONAL SECURITY

General Michael Hayden, USAF (Ret.)

Principal

The Chertoff Group

As Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, General Hayden was responsible for overseeing the collection of information concerning the plans, intentions and capabilities of America’s adversaries; producing timely analysis for decision makers; and conducting covert operations to thwart terrorists and other enemies of the US.  Before becoming Director of the CIA, General Hayden served as the country’s first Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence and was the highest-ranking intelligence officer in the armed forces. Earlier, he served as Commander of the Air Intelligence Agency, Director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center, Director of the National Security Agency and Chief of the Central Security Service.

Overview 

General Hayden will address how the government balances the rights of individuals to privacy and civil liberties, and the requirement of the government to protect the nation against emerging threats.  The post 9/11 era has seen two key trends develop:  increased asymmetric threats to national security from terrorists, cyber hackers and nation states; and, dramatic increases in the volume of information on individual citizens that is now available on the Internet.  Recent public disclosures regarding the extent to which the U.S. government has access to information associated with individual citizens has renewed the debate over how to balance personal liberty with security.  At the end of this session, the audience will understand in greater detail the implications to national security of the Snowden leaks, and the challenges the U.S. government faces in protecting its secrets.

Focus Questions

  • Regarding civil liberties and national security, is there a red line that should never be crossed? 
  • What fundamental principles associated with civil liberties should be protected vigorously?
  • What is the role of Congressional oversight on this issue?  Has it been adequate? What improvements might be suitable?

 

11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.

LUNCH AND EXHIBITS

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

SESSION FOUR: REMAINING RELEVANT IN THE INFORMATION AGE

Overview

Speakers in the symposium’s final session will discuss how intelligence professionals must constantly improve their professional competencies if they are to remain relevant in an era of ubiquitous data.  Skilled intelligence professionals now are increasingly competing with those in the media, pundits, bloggers, and even their own bosses – in an effort to produce timely assessments of current events.  Panelists will discuss this emerging tension between uses of traditional and non-traditional sources of information.  They will use examples from their own experiences to explain how information, from multiple sources, is incorporated into the process for informing warfighters and policy-makers.  At the end of this session, the audience will better understand what sources of information decision-makers rely on, what developments can improve the information flow and the knowledge gained, and how the IC can improve its effectiveness by in this challenging environment.

Focus Questions 

  • How do decision makers process, internalize, and visualize data and, more importantly, intelligence products?  What works and what does not work?    
  • What can the IC could do to improve its content and delivery methods?  How can the IC best leverage industry thinking and IRADs to solve big data analytic problems germane to decision making? 
  • What are the best methods for introducing new decision-makers to the growing data rich environment?   How can industry help?

Session Co-Chairs

MG Brian Keller, USA (Ret.)

Senior Vice President

Leidos 

Mr. Scott White

Vice President, Government Relations

Northrop Grumman 

Session Speakers

LTG Dell Dailey, USA (Ret.)

President

Thayer Leaders Development Group

Prior to his current efforts in the private sector, Ambassador (Ret) Dailey served as the Coordinator for Counterterrorism for The Department of State charged with coordinating and supporting the development and implementation of U.S. Government policies and programs aimed at countering terrorism overseas. Ambassador Dailey served over 36 years on active duty in the United States Army. He reached the rank of Lieutenant General as the Director of the Center for Special Operations (CSO), U.S. Special Operations Command, at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.  

LTG Michael Flynn, USA

Director

Defense Intelligence Agency

Gen Flynn’s first assignment in the U.S. Army was as a paratrooper of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Since then, he has served in a variety of command and staff positions to include, Commander, 313th Military Intelligence Battalion and G2, 82nd Airborne Division; G2, 18th Airborne Corps, CJ2, CJTF-180 Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan; Commander, 111th Military Intelligence Brigade at the Army's Intelligence Center at Fort Huachuca, Arizona; Director of Intelligence, Joint Special Operations Command with duty in OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF); Director of Intelligence, United States Central Command with duty in OEF and OIF; Director of Intelligence, the Joint Staff; Director of Intelligence, International Security Assistance Force-Afghanistan and US Forces-Afghanistan and Special Assistant to the Deputy Chief of Staff, G2.  He most recently served as the Assistant Director of National Intelligence for Partner Engagement before becoming the 18th Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency.

Ms. Letitia Long

Director

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Ms. Long is the fifth Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the first female head of a major U.S. intelligence agency.  Her civilian federal career in the Department of Defense (DOD) and Intelligence Community (IC) began with the U.S. Navy at the David Taylor Research Center in 1982. In 1988, Ms. Long joined the Office of the Director of Naval Intelligence, where she managed intelligence research and development programs. From 1994 to 1998, Ms. Long held a number of positions at the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) including serving as DIA’s first chief information officer. In 1998, she was assigned as the Executive Director for Intelligence Community Affairs for the Director of Central Intelligence, responsible for community-wide policy formulation, resource planning, and program assessment and evaluation. She later served as the Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence from 2000 to 2003 and next as the first Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence (Policy, Requirements and Resources). Prior to her appointment to NGA, Ms. Long served as the Deputy Director of DIA from 2006 until 2010.
 

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

TYING IT ALL TOGETHER:  DOD ACQUISITION & INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

The Honorable Heidi Shyu

Assistant Secretary of the Army, Acquisition, Logistics and Technology (ASA(ALT))

As the ASA (ALT), Ms. Shyu serves as the Army Acquisition Executive, the Senior Procurement Executive, the Science Advisor to the Secretary of the Army, and the Army’s Senior Research and Development official. Prior to this position, Ms. Shyu was the Vice President of Technology Strategy for Raytheon Company’s Space and Airborne Systems. A member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 2000 to 2010, Ms. Shyu served as the Vice Chairman from 2003 to 2005 and as Chairman from 2005 to 2008.

Overview

The final keynote speaker will discuss how DoD acquisition organizations, processes and policies may need to evolve in an era of ubiquitous data and finite resources.  Ms Shyu  will comment on how government acquisition is attempting to achieve the goal of “Better Buying Power”…to do more without more.  She also will address how government and industry, partnering together, are delivering better capabilities to the warfighter and greater value to the taxpayer.   

 

Focus Questions

  • How can government and industry improve their partnerships in this increasingly challenging fiscal environment?
  • Does the big data era create meaningful efficiencies for the government acquisition community?
  • What examples exist where the government’s efforts to achieve efficiencies actually resulted in reduced costs and improved capabilities?
  • What efficiency initiatives have been less successful?  Are there any key factors that inhibited success?

3:30 p.m.

SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP

LTG  Robert Noonan, Jr., USA (Ret.)

Senior Vice President

Booz Allen Hamilton