SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS

Mr. Judson Barnes

Director, Office of Technical Collection Affairs

Bureau of Intelligence and Research

US Department of State

Mr. Barnes is responsible for technical intelligence policy, coordination with the technical collection organizations of the intelligence community, operational liaison for sensitive, covert, and advanced collection systems, and staff support to State Department principals on programmatic, architectural, and other collection issues. He has been engaged in intelligence collection coordination issues for almost 30 years, including acting as the primary action officer responsible for representing the Department's interests in covert and advanced collection systems.

Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland  

Dr. Nolte is the former director of education and training in the office of the Director of National Intelligence and chancellor of the National Intelligence University. He is a former Deputy Assistant Director of Central Intelligence, Central Intelligence Agency. He was Director of Training, Chief of Legislative Affairs and Senior Intelligence Advisor at the National Security Agency. He also served as Deputy National Intelligence Officer for the Near East and South Asia during the Gulf War. He has taught at several Washington area universities, is on the board of CIA's Studies in Intelligence, and directed the Intelligence Fellows Program.

Ms. Michele Weslander Quaid

Chief Technology Officer (Public Sector)

Innovation Evangelist
Google, Inc.

Prior to joining Google, Ms. Weslander Quaid's work experience included nearly 20 years in the national security community, to include over a decade in industry, before being asked to join the United States Government in 2002 in various transformational roles. During her time as a senior executive in the US government, she served in some “first ever” roles to include: Deputy Technical Executive for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA); Intelligence Community Deputy Chief Information Officer for the Director of National Intelligence (DNI); Chief Technology Officer for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO); and, the DNI’s senior representative to the Secretary of Defense’s Intelligence-Surveillance-Reconnaissance (ISR) Task Force leading information sharing and collaboration initiatives in support of coalition stability operations.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

7:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST & EXHIBITS

8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.

AFCEA WELCOME

Mr. Steven Ritchey

Vice President for Intelligence

AFCEA International

8:15 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

SYMPOSIUM CO-CHAIRS’ WELCOME

Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland  

 

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

INTELLIGENCE FOR THE WORLD OF 2030


Speaker

Dr. Christopher Kojm

Chairman

National Intelligence Council

The National Intelligence Council supports the Director of National Intelligence in his role as head of the Intelligence Community (IC) and is the IC’s center for long-term strategic analysis.  Since its establishment in 1979, the NIC has served as a bridge between the intelligence and policy communities, a source of deep substantive expertise on intelligence issues, and a facilitator of Intelligence Community collaboration and outreach.  The NIC’s National Intelligence Officers — drawn from government, academia, and the private sector—are the Intelligence Community’s senior experts on a range of regional and functional issues.

Overview

The National Intelligence Council is the Intelligence Community’s senior analytic component.  In addition to serving as the lead analysts in their areas of responsibility (often serving concurrently as National Intelligence Managers), The National Intelligence Officers direct the National Estimates process and the preparation of the Global Trends studies of long-term outlooks for the future intelligence environment.

 

Focus Questions 

  • What are the key factors driving the intelligence environment over the next fifteen years?
  • Which of our traditional processes and structures will continue to succeed over the long term? Which will require major revision or replacement?
  • How can industry help in a period marked both by rapid environmental change and, probably, tight budgets?

9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

SESSION ONE: BRAVE OR NOT, IT WILL BE A NEW WORLD: KEY CHANGES COMING


Session Co-Chairs

Mr. Paul Kozemchak

Special Assistant to the Director

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Mr. Kozemchak is DARPA's liaison with the US Intelligence Community. He is a member of the Expert Advisory Group to the DNI's Scientific and Technical Intelligence Committee; the DNI's Intelligence Community Strategic Studies Group; and an advisor to the National Intelligence University and the Defense Science Board.  He works with the National Intelligence Council on Global Trends 2030.  He has served as a government advisor on several Defense Science Boards including: DOD 21st Century R&D Strategy; Countering Proliferation (Executive Secretary); Transnational Threats; Desert Storm Lessons Learned; and the Discriminate Use of Force. 

 

Maj Gen Robert Latiff, Ph.D, USAF (Ret.)

Director, Intelligence and Security Research Center
George Mason University

Dr. Latiff is a private consultant, providing advice on advanced technology to corporate and government clients. He is a Research Professor at George Mason University, where his interests are in weapon system acquisition and big data and advanced analytics. Dr. Latiff is also a Visiting Scholar and Adjunct Faculty Member at the University of Notre Dame where he is focused on ethics in science and technology. He is a member of the Air Force Studies Board of the National Academies. Major General Latiff served as the Director, Advanced Systems and Technology and Deputy Director for Systems Engineering at the National Reconnaissance prior to his retirement. 

 

Session Speakers

Dr. David Bray

Executive Director

National Commission for the Review of the Research and

Development Programs of the U.S. Intelligence Community

Dr. Bray oversees a team of interagency assignees working with twelve Congressionally appointed bipartisan Commissioners.  He previously served as Executive for Innovation, Integration, and Interoperability, Office of the Program Manager, Information Sharing Environment.  He also deployed to Afghanistan as a Special Advisor to STRATEGIC EFFECTS for NATO's International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces Afghanistan, with the task of helping to "think differently" on critical strategic efforts.   He served as IT Chief for the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he led the technology aspects of the bioterrorism program's response to 9/11, anthrax in 2001, SARS, and other outbreaks.

Dr. Peter Highnam

Director

Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity

Dr. Highnam joined IARPA in February 2009 as the Office Director for Incisive Analysis. Prior to IARPA, he was a senior advisor in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and then in the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA). From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Highnam was a DARPA program manager with programs in electronic warfare and airborne communications. Before joining DARPA, he worked for more than a decade in applied research in industry.

Overview

Looking into the future, any scenario of relevance includes the continued development, and likely proliferation of disruptive technologies.  While the U.S. enjoys a technological lead, other countries and groups are amazingly adept at adopting new technologies, mostly, but not always, for good purposes.  The technical intelligence and technology assessment functions of the IC atrophied over a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan while the U.S. placed extraordinary efforts on counterterrorism and counterinsurgency. While the U.S. rebalances its strategic focus to include the Pacific, it also will need to strengthen and reenergize its abilities to rapidly assess foreign technology developments and to counter game-changing technical threats from others, while maintaining its long standing advantage in preventing strategic technology surprise.  A key focus of this session will be to identify where the IC and DoD maintain unassailable technological superiority, where they are in danger of losing their edge, and what they need to do to prevent others from appropriating these technologies for malevolent purposes.

 

Focus Questions

  • In addition to those highlighted in Global Trends 2030, what are the key game changing technologies with which the U.S. should be concerned, and over what time frames?
  • Where does the U.S. lead in relation to the technological capabilities of foreign entities?
  • How big a challenge is the proliferation of technologies and can the proliferation be stopped – or managed?

10:30 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

NETWORKING BREAK AND EXHIBITS

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

SESSION TWO: RELEVANCY OF INTELLIGENCE IN THE INFORMATION AGE

Session Co-Chairs

Mr. Charles Allen

Principal Chertoff Group

The Chertoff Group, a global security advisory firm that provides consulting, business development and merger and acquisition (M&A) advisory services for clients in the security, defense and government services industries. Mr. Allen was the Under Secretary for Intelligence Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security from 2007 to 2009.  He worked at the CIA for over forty years, and became the Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Collection in 1998. He also served as CIA’s National Intelligence Officer for Warning, Director of the National Warning Staff, National Intelligence Officer for Counterterrorism, Deputy Chief for Intelligence of CIA’s Counterterrorism Center and the Director of the DCI Hostage Location Task Force from 1985 to 1987.

CAPT Rick Myllenbeck, USN

CAPT Myllenbeck, USN, APR; is in his 37th year of service with the U.S. Navy and Navy Reserve (Information Dominance Corps), and is a veteran of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.  He has more than 25 years of experience in the Silicon Valley, having directed marketing, public relations and executive communications programs for Apple, Novell, Creative Labs, Sybase and IBM.

Session Speakers

Ms. Carmen Medina

Specialist Leader

Deloitte Consulting LLP

Ms. Medina joined Deloitte Consulting LLP after retiring from an almost 32 years-career at the Central Intelligence Agency. Since joining Deloitte, she has continued to support the Intelligence Community on issues such as social networking and future trends, and is also working closely with Deloitte’s Center for Federal Innovation. Her areas of interest include developing rigor in analytics, navigating the emergence of new global norms in the 21st century, developing the transparent and collaborative future culture of work, and supporting diversity.  Her last assignment at CIA was as Director of the Center for the Study of Intelligence (CSI) from January 2007-December 2009.

Mr. Len Moodispaw

President and CEO

KEYW Corp.

Mr. Moodispaw has served as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), President & Chairman of the board of directors of KEYW since it began operations on August 4, 2008. Prior to the founding of KEYW, Mr. Moodispaw was President and Chief Executive Officer for Essex Corporation, or Essex, from 2000 until January 2007, and Chairman of the board of directors of Essex from 2005 to January 2007. Essex provided advanced signal, image, information processing, information assurance and cybersecurity solutions, primarily for U.S. Government intelligence and defense customers, as well as for commercial customers.

 

Overview

The IC is challenged to remain relevant in the global world of information that is moving at petabyte scale and at wire speed.  Traditional intelligence will remain vital but increasingly U.S. decision-makers, accustomed to performing their own analysis through technical media, will expect the IC to bring together all forms of data and information, including the broad range of social and new media, to provide assessments and warning of threats to U.S. national interests globally.  It is far from clear, however, whether the IC fully understands this paradigm shift and is changing with sufficient speed to accommodate the new information world.  What is becoming clearer, however, is that the IC will become ineffective unless it assimilates new and dynamic information technologies, capabilities, processes, and finds new means of conveying this knowledge to policy makers.  In this non-traditional era, it also is clear that the U.S. needs to ensure that laws and practices keep pace with technological change and intelligence activities if the privacy and civil liberties of U.S. citizens are to be protected and a "surveillance society" avoided. 

 

Focus Questions

  • What changes in the IC's current structure, leadership, and strategic planning are needed to meet the expectations of decision makers of the future when it comes to incorporating non-traditional information (aka “OSINT” or "omni-source" or "omin-int")?
  • How can the IC bring together social media  information and data with the traditional forms of intelligence collection and analysis to ensure that it is effective in providing strategic assessment and warning where much of the information may come from totally non-nation states sources?
  • Where and how can the IC initiate the rethinking of the business of intelligence and effective utilization and deployment of all resources, to include intelligence analysis to prepare it for the dynamic environment that is already unfolding?  In other words, how does the IC develop intelligence expertise for the 21st Century?
 

12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

LUNCH AND EXHIBITS

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

SESSION THREE: PUBLIC–PRIVATE RELATIONSHIPS FOR THE NEW INTELLIGENCE ENVIRONMENT 

Session Co-Chairs

Dr. William Nolte

Research Professor

Director, Center for Intelligence Research and Education

School of Public Policy

University of Maryland  

Ms. Michele Weslander Quaid
Chief Technology Officer (Federal)

Innovation Evangelist
Google, Inc.

  

Session Speakers
Dr. Ruth David, PhD

President & Chief Executive Officer

Analytic Services Inc.

In October 1998, Dr. David was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of Analytic Services, Inc, and in 1999, she initiated the corporation’s Homeland Defense Strategic Thrust to address the growing national concern of multidimensional, asymmetric threats from rogue nations, substate terrorist groups, and domestic terrorism; formally creating the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security in May 2001 to enhance public awareness and contribute to the dialogue on national, state, and local level. In 2004, the corporation was selected by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to establish the legislatively-mandated Homeland Security Institute, later renamed the Homeland Security Studies & Analysis Institute (HSSAI).

Ms. Theresa Everett

Former Deputy Director of the Intelligence Staff

Office of the Director of National Intelligence

In December 2005, Ms Everett was appointed the first DNI Procurement Executive by the Director of National Intelligence, with oversight responsibility for Community-wide procurement activities. She also served as Senior SIGINT Manager in the Office of the Deputy Director of Central Intelligence for Community Management, with oversight responsibility for acquisitions at the National Security Agency and National Reconnaissance Office.

Overview

The private sector has always played a crucial role in the American national security successes.  In the dynamic, complex, and volatile environment of the next 15-20 years, both government and the private sector (including corporate and academic institutions) must build stronger collaborative relationships in order to better adapt to the emerging environments to enable agility and continued mission success.  This panel will discuss both continuing and emerging challenges in the public-private partnership, to include technical, procedural, and cultural issues that must be addressed.

 

Focus Questions 

  • How can the IC utilize the capabilities in the private sector to increase its capabilities and improve its agility?
  • What current procedures and policies inhibit healthy public-private relationships over and how can they be addressed?
  • How best can the public and private sectors work together to confront these problems and address their potential impact to our national security?

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

STRETCH BREAK

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

REBALANCING INTELLIGENCE

Speaker

RDML T.J. White, USN

Deputy Director, Tailored Access Operations

National Security Agency

Overview 

As the US Intelligence Community shifts from twelve years of providing timely tactical intelligence to warfighters in Iraq and Afghanistan to a more strategic global focus, US policymakers will require more strategic assessments and warning intelligence in order to make informed decisions in a complex world.  The Administration in its National Security Strategy has spoken of “a rebalance” of resources, including intelligence, to meet broader and longer-range threats to US national security.  In this changed environment, new and rapidly evolving streams of information and knowledge are inundating the policy level in addition to traditional classified intelligence.  While it is acknowledged that secret intelligence will always be a critical element in decision making, the policymakers of the future will likely turn to the new streams of open source information as they develop national security strategies and deal with difficult threats and policy decisions in the future. 

Focus Questions

  • The challenges of rebalancing US national security resources -- including intelligence with a focus on tactical decision masking,--  seems almost insurmountable given the successive crises in the Middle East and South Asia.  What must be done at the policy level to ensure that national resources, including intelligence, are realigned?
  • How can the policy level engage with the IC better to understand the relative roles of open source and traditional intelligence in meeting policymaker requirements?
  • Given the insatiable demand for information and the pervasive intelligence collection capabilities of the IC, what is the policy maker’s responsibility to ensure that America does not become “a surveillance society?”  What more can an Administration, working with the legislative and judicial branches of government, do to protect privacy and civil liberty rights?

3:30 p.m.

SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP 

Mr. Judson Barnes

Director, Office of Technical Collection Affairs

Bureau of Intelligence and Research

US Department of State