signalarticles

Digital Storage Dynamos Ease Data Deluge

February 2001
By Christian B. Sheehy

The increasingly heavy flow of data within organizational networks is driving the search for better methods to store actively used information and archives. Advances in optical-disc technology are producing greater versatility in multimedia hardware and software. As a result, consumers will soon achieve increased systems interoperability through a more refined focus on equipment compatibility.

Insider Cybercrime Finds No Place to Hide

February 2001
By Christian B. Sheehy

Advances in computer network security are empowering network-dependent organizations to address the sobering fact that a majority of threats to proprietary information today originate within the pool of authorized users. A new off-the-shelf software application that monitors the flow of data through a network enables organizations to counter internal threats to sensitive information by identifying the source of a violation. The U.S. Defense Department is exploring the software as a way to address its security concerns.

Intelligent Agents Get Smarter

February 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Prototype technology could someday help exhausted or stressed front-line officers make sound critical decisions by providing advice based on their own career experiences. The software program can create a database consisting of an individual's professional knowledge that can be expanded and modified throughout a person's career.

Keeping a Finger on the Pulse of Spectrum Management

February 2001
By Christian B. Sheehy

An experimental radio technology may provide a more efficient means of alleviating bandwidth congestion in wireless communications. Operating at lower power than most radio devices, time-modulated ultrawideband technology fuses communications, radar and tracking capabilities into one piece of hardware that can deliver improved performance while remaining compatible with most legacy and commercial off-the-shelf systems.

Pacific Rim Technologists Focus on Warfighter

February 2001
By Melvin Ing

New technology for the warfighter and the interoperability issues that encompass the expansive Pacific region were the focus of top-level leaders at the 15th annual TechNet Asia-Pacific 2000 Conference and Exposition held in Honolulu, Hawaii, December 5 to 7. The conference and exposition brought together numerous entities that make the warfighter successful. The location of activities at sites such as the USS Missouri, and the timing of the event during the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, highlighted the relevance of the conference.

Universities Respond to Growing Demand With Custom-Designed Technology Programs

February 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

The rapid advancement of technology is causing continuous change in academic institutions tasked with preparing the work force of the next century. An incessant and increasing need for technically proficient personnel has placed a burden on institutions of higher education, demanding that they produce employees who can handle information technology systems that now permeate virtually every aspect of the business world.

Israel Designs Antiarmor Missile To Fire Out of Tank Guns

February 1999
By Mark H. Kagan

Israel is developing a laser-guided antitank/antihelicopter missile that will be fired out of tank guns instead of from missile launchers. In its antihelicopter role, the missile would enable tanks to defend themselves against fast-moving helicopters that can fire antitank missiles from beyond the effective range of conventional tank gun projectiles or onboard machine guns.

China Forges Ahead With Indigenous Avionics Base

February 1999
By James C. Bussert

The People's Republic of China is grappling with an inherent conflict of relying on imported avionics technology while pressing to develop a state-of-the-art domestic manufacturing base. The country continues its long-term commitment to advanced avionics research and development both for internal use and for export, and foreign technology is one source feeding that endeavor.

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