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Support STEM Grants By Donating Old Electronics

March 1, 2017

This year, consider donating your old electronics to benefit the AFCEA Educational Foundation. It’s a simple way to clear your e-clutter, and you could reap a tax benefit.

From l to r, service chiefs from the U.S. Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps address critical issues facing the U.S. military. Photo by Mike Carpenter

Tomorrow's U.S. Military Will Differ From Today, But Can the Services Get What They Need?

February 23, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
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Some 16 years of continuous combat, coupled with a U.S. military force that got too used to going against a benign power projection by would-be adversaries, has sidelined the services a bit, and the world is rapidly catching up, service leaders shared on the final day of the West 2017 conference. Senior leaders from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard took the stage Thursday afternoon to address critical military concerns, including military readiness and might, recruitment and retention, and what a future military force might look like.

Adm. Michael Rogers, USN (l), and Adm. James Stavridis, USN (Ret.), discuss national security issues during day three of the West 2017 conference in San Diego. Photo by Mike Carpenter

Cybersecurity Must Take Front and Center National Attention, Experts Say

February 23, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
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Cybersecurity can no longer be viewed as a technology-only problem and segmented into stovepipes where the U.S. Defense Department carries out one set of tasks; the civilian government another; and industry does its own thing, said Adm. Michael Rogers, USN, director of the NSA and commander of U.S. Cyber Command. “It must be viewed more broadly and must be tackled from a national security perspective,” Adm. Rogers said during a morning West 2017 presentation Thursday with Adm. James Stavridis, USN (Ret.), former NATO commander.

Adm. Philip Davidson, USN, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, warns that the Navy is taking a risk by pushing modernization efforts to the back burner in favor of forward deployed fleet readiness. Photo by Mike Carpenter
Adm. Philip Davidson, USN, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, delivers a keynote at day two of the West 2017 conference in San Diego. Photo by Mike Carpenter

U.S. Navy Taking Risks by Pushing Modernization in Favor of Forward Deployed Fleet Readiness, Admiral Warns

February 22, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
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The integrity of the U.S. Navy suffers today because the integrity of the force depends on capability, capacity and readiness—three areas that have taken a beating with a Navy at war for 15 years and the budget shortfalls threatening so many military arenas, said Adm. Philip Davidson, USN, commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, at West 2017. 

Adm. James “Sandy” Winnefeld, USN (Ret.), the former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, talks about disruptive technologies during a keynote address at West 2017 in San Diego. Photo by Mike Carpenter

Disruption Today Will Make or Break the U.S. Military, Winnefeld Warns

February 22, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
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The U.S. military is at a critical innovation junction. Will it succumb to a disruptive environment or prevail? All indications point to an outcome that could go either way. “Disruption occurs when something happens that upends entire belief systems and fundamentally reshapes, or in some cases takes down, entire institutions,” said Adm. James “Sandy” Winnefeld, USN (Ret.), during a keynote address at West 2017. “Historical change can be difficult to see when you’re actually living through it,” Winnefeld said. “But that kind of disruption may be exactly what is happening to us today.”

Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, deputy chief of naval operations for information warfare and director of naval intelligence, speaks at West 2017. Photo by Mike Carpenter
A panel at West 2017 discusses information warfare. Photo by Mike Carpenter

Information Warfare: What is It?

February 22, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
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Information warfare is an aggressive game of soccer where not only are all the fans on the field with the players, but no one is wearing uniforms. Unlike the dominance the U.S. military enjoyed for years in the conventional warfare realm, the lack of physical and geographic boundaries in cyberspace test modern warfighting doctrine, said Vice Adm. Marshall Lytle III, USCG, during a panel discussion at the West 2017 conference, co-sponsored by AFCEA International and the U.S. Naval Institute and taking place this week in San Diego.

Adm. Harry Harris, USN, commander of U.S. Pacific Command, delivers a keynote address at West 2017 in San Diego. Photo by Michael Carpenter
Adm. Harry Harris, USN, commander of U.S. Pacific Command, tells conference attendees: 'I need your help.' Photo by Micheal Carpenter

'Exponential Thinking' Will Propel the U.S. Beyond its Adversaries, Adm. Harris Says

February 21, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
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It is imperative that the United States—government and private companies alike—begin using its inherent innovative spirit to think exponentially and develop technologies that will save time, dollars and lives while defeating the nation's adversaries, said Adm. Harry Harris, USN, commander of U.S. Pacific Command. Exponential thinking were the buzzwords of his address and the cornerstone of what likely will help define the future of the U.S. military, he shared at West 2017. But getting there requires the powers that be to break paradigms that will take military forces to the next level.

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