SIGNALScape

Senate to Bring Cyber Bill Mirroring House Effort

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
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The U.S. Senate is moving on a cyber bill that is more in line with the approach being taken by the House, said a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-TX) told the morning audience at the AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that this bill may be marked up by the Senate Commerce Committee this week. It would turn to standards established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for private sector guidelines.

Thornberry reflected on how the House passed four separate cyber bills a year ago, but they died in the Senate as that body pursued a single large bill. The congressman endorsed the House concept of legislating cybersecurity in “discrete, bite-size chunks” that reach across the relevant government committees and agencies.

The congressman called for greater cooperation between Congress and the White House, saying that this can produce a cyber policy that benefits the nation as a whole. The more the administration and Congress work together, the more their work becomes the policy of the nation rather than that of any particular administration, Republican or Democrat. “Only with this partnership can we have the solutions the country needs,” he declared.

Sandia Speeds Intellectual Property Sharing With Small Business

July 29, 2013

To facilitate innovation development, Sandia National Laboratories is building a portfolio of intellectual property (IP) that businesses can license in as little as an hour. The ready-to-sign licenses feature simplified language and pared-down terms, conditions and reporting requirements. Up-front fees are in the $3,000 range, and royalty percentages are low.

Sandia has approximately 1,300 patents available for licensing, and while large companies often take advantage of this IP, small firms often do not have the human or financial resources to seize the opportunity. The new license procedure enables entrepreneurs to click on one link and download all of the information they need. The licenses are nonexclusive, so any number of companies can make use of the technology.

“These are all technologies that no one has licensed in areas where small businesses might be able to get a foothold,” Bob Westervelt, business development specialist, Sandia, says. “A small company could take any of these licenses and run with it.” Currently, eight patents qualify for the program, but Sandia officials say the portfolio could reach up to 50. Additional information about Sandia technology transfer opportunities is available online.

New Touch Technology Has Sensitive Skin

July 26, 2013

Engineers at UC Berkeley have created a system of sensors on flexible plastic that reacts to pressure by lighting up. The new "e-skin" recognizes the amount of pressure and responds with a brighter or dimmer light accordingly.

The technology can be used to give robots a more precise sense of touch and also might be used to create interactive wallpapers or automobile dashboards.

What differentiates the e-skin from other touch sensor networks is its flexibility and interactivity, says Chuan Wang, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Michigan State University. Wang participated in the research as a post-doctoral student at UC Berkeley, as part of a research team led by Ali Javey. Because the e-skin is pliable, it can be applied as a laminate to other surfaces.



You can view the e-skin in action here:

 

Smartphone Increases Soldier Intelligence

July 26, 2013

10th Mountain Division U.S. Army Rangers and soldiers on the battlefield are now wearing commercial smartphones to communicate with each other and higher commands. Nett Warrior is a Samsung Galaxy Note II with its commercial memory wiped clean and Army-developed software loaded. It displays the locations of fellow soldiers, allows placement of location digital chem-light markers, and enables warfighters to communicate through texting. This information is then relayed to commanders over encrypted tactical radios.

“We are beholden to the commercial industry,” Jason Regnier, project manager, Nett Warrior, PEO Soldier, says. At approximately $700 per unit, buying the devices commercially costs substantially less than procuring similar devices from contractors, he explains.

In addition, the ability to buy newer versions of a device as technology matures means soldiers can transition to up-to-date capabilities as they develop. “So when the Note IIs are gone, they’re gone. Then we’ll have to be ready to buy Note IIIs or whatever it’s going to be,” Regnier relates.

Before the smartphones are integrated into a Net Warrior system, most of the communications capability is disabled, including the cellular antennas and the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities. A USB connection with a soldier’s hip-mounted Rifleman Radio enables communication.

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