SIGNALScape

What the Joint Information Environment is Not

May 21, 2013
By Max Cacas
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When it comes to the U.S. Defense Department’s Joint Information Environment (JIE), it's best to toss out old thinking about information technology programs.

“The JIE is not a program,” David DeVries, deputy chief information officer for information enterprise, Defense Department, stressed. DeVries oversees the effort to tie together the vast information technology resources of the military, providing crucial information to warfighters “at the point where they need it.”

DeVries delivered the opening keynote address at the AFCEA SOLUTIONS Series-George Mason University Symposium, “Critical Issues in C4I.”

The JIE, he said, encompasses work going on simultaneously in the realms of data center consolidation, identity and access management, and mobile. In the area of mobile, DeVries told the conference that part of making the JIE work is realizing that such devices must be managed, and policies must be set to maximize their value to the warfighters.

The SOLUTIONS conference also is set to explore big data, cloud computing, interoperability, information technology acquisition reform and mobility management. The conference continues through tomorrow at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

Government Lab Helps Choose Future Warfighting Vehicles

May 21, 2013

U.S. soldiers are expanding the use of the Capability Portfolio Analysis Tool (CPAT) across the Army’s modernization program after its success in shifting the paradigm for conducting analysis. CPAT offers an advanced combination of modeling, simulation and optimization decision support software. Currently, the Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems (PEO GCS) is its primary user, employing it to analyze potential scenarios as technology advances and changes occur in the global environment and the federal budget as well as other factors that could influence future purchases.

Heidi Shyu, assistant secretary of the Army for acquisition, logistics and technology, asked Sandia National Laboratories personnel to brief other Army PEOs. As a result, Sandia is working with Enterprise Information Systems to apply CPAT to complex decision-making processes.

Eventually, CPAT could be adapted to other military branches or applied to entirely different, complex decision-making processes in other large organizations.“The challenge is each organization has different things that they are managing. Conceptually you are making decisions about how you invest your money, but the details of what goes into it are very, very different,” Craig Lawton, lead for Sandia’s PEO GCS projects, says. “The sky’s the limit.”

Researchers from Sandia National Laboratories, the U.S. Army and other organizations developed the CPAT about two years ago; last year it won the Military Operations Research Society’s Richard H. Barchi Prize.

Cool App-titude: MyMilitaryLife

May 21, 2013
By Rachel Eisenhower

The National Military Family Association recently launched the MyMilitaryLife app for Android and iPhone, which offers military families resources to help them through the different stages of life.

MyMilitaryLife is free and takes users through 10 "Life Paths," including having a baby; reintegration; transitioning out of the military; spouse education and employment; deployment; and moving, among others. The app also includes custom to-do lists, due date reminders, tailored resources based on service branch, location and needs, and push notifications to keep users in the loop.

The National Military Family Association is a nonprofit dedicated to strengthening and protecting the families of men and women currently serving, retired, wounded or fallen.

Download the free app from the iTunes App Store or Google Play.

Watch the video below for a demo of the app.

These sites are not affiliated with AFCEA or SIGNAL Magazine, and we are not responsible for the content or quality of the products offered. When visiting new Web sites, please use proper Internet security procedures.

Lockheed Awarded Aegis Funds

May 20, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Lockheed Martin Corp., Mission Systems and Training, Moorestown, N.J., is being awarded a $24,071,521 modification to previously awarded contract to exercise an option for Aegis Combat System engineering agent efforts for the design, development, integration, test and delivery of computer program baselines and associated technology insertion hardware design support for the next/future advanced capability build. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity. 

Defense Department Personnel Urged to Provide Information for DOD Enterprise White Pages

May 17, 2013

Defense Department personnel are encouraged to update their information for the new DOD Enterprise White Pages, which provides browser-based access to DOD enterprise identity and contact information maintained by the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) Person Data Repository.

The tool, which can be accessed by users with a valid Common Access Card or External Certification Authority certificate via the Internet or the Unclassified-But-Sensitive Internet Protocol Router Network, is part of the Defense Information Systems Agency’s Identity and Access Management collection of solutions.

DOD personnel can update their duty organization, duty location and other attribute information managed by the DMDC at http://milconnect.dmdc.mil.

The DOD Enterprise White Pages replaces the Joint Enterprise Directory Services search.
 

 

 

BAE Awarded Smart Waveform Research and Development Contract

May 17, 2013
George I. Seffers
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BAE Systems Information and Electronic Systems, Merrimack, N.H., was awarded a $11,943,869 modification to a previously awarded contract for smart waveforms using evasive and adaptive protocols (SWEAP) software/hardware/testbed to demonstrate CommEx's capabilities for recognition, optimization, and mitigation in software-only upgrades using the current processing resources, software upgrades on enhanced processing resources, hardware and antenna upgrades. The total cumulative face value of the contract is $18,245,337. Fiscal 2013 Research and Development funds provided by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in the amount of $4,590,234 will be obligated at the time of award. The contracting activity is Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, N.Y.
 

BAE Supports U.S. Navy Air Warfare Center

May 17, 2013
George I. Seffers
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BAE Systems Technology Solutions and Services Inc., Rockville, Md., is being awarded a $37,760,767 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to exercise an option for engineering and technical services and supplies for the design, development, integration, test and evaluation, maintenance and logistics support of communication-electronic platform, equipment, systems and subsystems in support of the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division’s Special Communications Requirements Division. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, St. Inigoes, Md., is the contracting activity. 

U.S. Air Force Procures Fault Detection System

May 17, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Total Quality Systems, Roy, Utah, has been awarded a $7,055,753 firm-fixed-price contract for Small Business Innovative Research Phase III Intermittent Fault Detection and Isolation System, which will provide services in support of the development and delivery of an 8448-channel intermittent fault detection and isolation system and an F-16 AN/APG-68 radar system programmable signal processor test program set, including the required interface test adapter. The contracting activity is Air Force Sustainment Center, Hill AFB, Utah.  

Jacobs Technology to Support U.S. Air Force Bases

May 17, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Jacobs Technology Inc., Lincoln, Mass., was recently awarded two cost-plus-fixed-fee and cost-reimbursable contract for interim support of services to provide engineering and technology acquisition support services. One contract is valued at  $8,527,294, the other at $14,448,258. The types of services include but are not limited to: engineering services, engineering support, technical support, provisioning and logistics, modeling and simulation, configuration and data management, architectural support, test and evaluation, security engineering and certification, capability based planning, commercial-off-the-shelf integration, integrated master plans and scheduling and technical reviews. Work will be performed at Hanscom Air Force Base (AFB), Mass., with primary geographically separated units at Peterson AFB, Colo.; Langley AFB, Va.; Eglin AFB, Fla.; Maxwell-Gunter AFB, Ala.; and Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, with an expected completion date of Nov 15, 2013. Contract has a foreign military sales component as the contract requires company to travel overseas for host nation support. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center is the contracting authority.

New Funding Rules Call for New Thinking

May 16, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor
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Robert O. Work, former undersecretary of the Navy, and current chief executive officer, Center for a New American Security, spoke frankly about the state of the military’s financial circumstances and shared his opinion about the next steps. The final keynote speaker at East: Joint Warfighting 2013 at the Virginia Beach Convention Center, Virginia, pointed out that this is not the first time the U.S. military has felt a budget crunch and the time for sounding the alarm has not yet arrived. Explaining that fiscal year 2013 is only the third year of a drawdown in funding, Work stated that the cuts have not yet bottomed out.

The most troubling issue may be that the bottom is not yet clearly apparent. However, Work predicted that tight budgets are likely to be around for the next four to nine years, unless something, such as another large national security threat, occurs to change it.

One difference between past and today’s budget cuts is the existence of the all-volunteer military. Personnel expenses are among the highest cost to the U.S. Defense Department. During the Vietnam era, troops were more than willing to leave the service when their military stint was up. However, today, the combination of more opportunities and the country’s economic crisis has resulted in service members who voluntarily joined the military staying in. To add to this conundrum, the department does not want to ask any of these talented, bright people to leave, so the cost of maintaining the military will remain high.

Attempting to balance the budget between what Congress is willing to approve and what the military needs to operate solely by implementing efficiencies “is a bunch of crap,” Work said. “It’s not as easy as people think.” Cutting procurement and research and development spending is the worst approach, he added, because these will only lead to larger expenditures in the future.

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