SIGNALScape

Lockheed Martin Supports Space Based Infrared System

July 1, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co., Sunnyvale, Calif., has been awarded a $75,230,383 modification to the existing fiscal 2013-2016 Contractor Logistics Support, Legacy Sustainment, and Combined Task Force Support contract for the Space Based Infrared System Survivable Endurable Evolution (S2E2), Increment 1. The total cumulative face value of the contract is $181,098,565. This contract modification is for permanent sustainment modifications to the current Mobile Ground System (MGS) to enable processing of Defense Support Program and SBIRS geosynchronous orbit satellites mission data and to perform limited contingency SBIRS GEO satellite commanding. This project also replaces the existing Intermediate Maintenance Facility with the Maintenance and Operations Support Suite used for pre-deployment preparation on the S2E2 MGS Force Packages, and to provide maintainer and limited operator training. The Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center Infrared Space Systems Directorate Contracting Division is the contracting activity.  

LinQuest to Provide System Engineering and Integration Support

July 1, 2013
George I. Seffers
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LinQuest Corp., Los Angeles, Calif., has been awarded a $121,182,989 cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for System Engineering and Integration Support Services (SE&I). The contractor will provide and maintain enterprise SE&I services for the current MILSATCOM Systems Directorate, execute and evolve standardized enterprise processes, control and manage the technical baseline and interface(s), perform system integration across the enterprise and within identified programs, develop and implement key systems engineering processes, developing tools and techniques to predict issues and enable timely action, and develop and maintain performance metrics. The Space and Missile Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., is the contracting activity.

U.S. Navy Modifies Harris Satellite Communications Contract

July 1, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Harris Corp., Palm Bay, Fla. is being awarded a $9,370,956 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed price contract for AN/WSC-6 E(V)9 satellite communication (SATCOM) systems. The AN/WSC-6 E(V)9 system is used by surface ships to provide a military SATCOM capability in the super high frequency range. This contract includes options, which if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of the contract to an estimated $40,515,414. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman to Upgrade Targeting Laser

July 1, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Electronic Systems Sector, Land and Self Protection Systems Division, Rolling Meadows, Ill., is being awarded an $11,567,751 fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to produce, test, integrate, qualify and deliver an upgraded laser configuration for the Electro-Optical Third Generation Console for the F/A-18 E/F Advanced Targeting Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) and the SH-60 FLIR. This effort will provide two production representative units, 102 upgraded units, and associated technical data, as well as technical and logistics support for the upgrade. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J., is the contracting activity.

Engility Supports Combat UAS Landing Systems

July 1, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Engility Corp., Mount Laurel, N.J., is being awarded a $12,490,000 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to exercise an option for engineering services in support of the Joint Precision Approach and Landing Systems and the Navy Unmanned Combat Aerial Systems programs. Services to be provided include requirements definition and analysis; prototyping; test and evaluation; technical assistance; system analysis; engineering; software development, integration and maintenance; test data acquisition; reduction and analysis; technical logistic support; configuration management; training support; and program and project management. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md. is the contracting activity.

Exelis Radar Contract Modified

July 1, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Exelis Inc., Van Nuys, Calif., is being awarded a $20,285,451 modification to previously awarded contract for AN/SPS-48G(V) radar modification kits to support the Recovery Obsolescence Availability Radar. AN/SPS-48 radars are installed on USN ships for three-dimensional air search. The modification kits are expected to increase operational availability and decrease operating and support costs. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington,, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Receives G/ATOR Contract Modification

July 1, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Northrop Grumman Corp., Electronic Systems, Linthicum Heights, Md., is being awarded a $24,502,359 modification under a previously awarded cost-plus-incentive-fee, firm-fixed-price contract to increase the estimated ceiling cost for the Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar engineering and manufacturing development phase and associated other direct costs to reflect the anticipated cost growth. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va., is the contracting activity.

NSA Director Says U.S. Is Best at Protecting Civil Liberties

June 27, 2013
By George I. Seffers
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The United States is one of the best in the world at protecting civil liberties, Gen. Keith Alexander, USA, director of National Security Agency (NSA) and commander of the U.S. Cyber Command said at the AFCEA Cyber Symposium in Baltimore.

Edward Snowden, the NSA contractor who leaked reams of data about NSA monitoring activities to the press, has been called a hero whistleblower by some, but Gen. Alexander contends that the employees at the NSA, FBI, CIA and Defense Department, who protect the nation while protecting civil liberties, are the real heroes.

As he has before, Gen. Alexander said the leaks have done irreparable harm to national security. “Public discussion of the NSA’s trade craft or the tools that support its operation provides insights that our adversaries—to include terrorists—can and do use to hide their activities. Those who wish us harm now know how we counter their actions. These leaks have caused significant and irreversible damage to our nation’s security. Historically, every time a capability is revealed, we lose our ability to track those targets,” he said. “What is going on with these leaks is unconscionable in my opinion.”

Gen. Alexander pointed out that approved processes exist for whistleblowers to express concern, and he pointed out that Snowden leaked information to the press rather than following those approved processes. “There are lawful and legitimate mechanisms to raise concerns about these programs. The NSA, the Defense Department and the director of national intelligence all have investigator generals who are in a position to do this. An individual acting nobly would have chosen one of those to voice his concerns,” he declared.

He also repeated claims that the monitoring programs have helped protect the United States and its allies on 54 occasions. He added that a recent oversight report found zero instances where the monitoring programs led to civil liberty violations.

Convergence Key to Success in Cyber Domain

June 27, 2013
By George I. Seffers
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Maj. Gen. Burke Wilson, USAF, director, space operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, told the audience that cyber is all about improving operational effectiveness in other domains. “Mission outcome is the only reason we invest in this. We believe it will generate in better mission outcomes across the service,” he stated.

Additionally, the cyber force includes the entire force—not just those trained to operate, maintain and defend the networks, Gen. Wilson offered. “If we give you a keyboard, you are an operator in this domain,” Gen. Wilson said. He also maintained that cyber operations need to follow similar processes to other operational domains. “My experience with operational commanders is that if they’re not familiar with something, they don’t trust it, and they tend not to use it,” he said.

Lt. Gen. Rhett Hernandez, USA, commanding general, Army Cyber Command, talked about the convergence of cyber with other domains. “From a joint perspective but also from the Army perspective, we see that the land and cyber domains are converging. Land is impacted by cyber, and the reverse is true. Humans today operate on both,” Gen. Hernandez pointed out. He added that other areas also are converging and that the convergence of cyber and the electromagnetic spectrum capabilities is key because military systems increasingly rely on both.

Rear Adm. Margaret Klein, USN, chief of staff, U.S. Cyber Command, discussed the need for cyber forces to provide real, demonstrable support to the combatant commands rather than be seen as spreading “fairy dust and calling it cyber.”

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