SIGNALScape

Research Paves Possible Path to Better Batteries

June 13, 2013

Research at the Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California, has revealed part of the mechanism by which particles of lithium ions move in and out of lithium iron phosphate (LFP). The findings could lead to improved performance in lithium ion batteries used in aircraft, electric vehicles and electronic equipment.

LFP is the newest, most recent material being used for lithium ion batteries and is considered safer and longer lasting than previously used materials such as lithium cobalt oxide. Until now, scientists did not understand how lithium ions move in and out of LFP while storing and releasing electrical energy. But now, X-ray microcoscopy has revealed that the lithium ions in LFP behave much like popcorn, in that they absorb the lithium one particle at a time as they are discharged. Researchers believe that this observed and recorded behavior explains, in part, the improved performance of LFP. The finding is important to a better understanding of how to construct improved lithium ion batteries using LFP. The research was funded internally by the U.S. Department of Energy and is reported in the journal Nano Letters.
 

 

Northrop Grumman to Deliver Radar Technology to Five Countries

June 12, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Northrop Grumman Electronic Business Segment, Linthicum Heights, Md., has been awarded a maximum $115 million firm-fixed-price contract to provide 16 AN/APG-68 (V)9 radar systems for the Royal Thai Air Force and 22 AN/APG-68 (V)9 radar systems for the Republic of Iraq for a total of 38 radar systems. This foreign military sale also includes spares for the Egyptian Air Force, Royal Moroccan Air Force and Pakistan Air Force. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.

U.S. Special Operations Procures Satellite Communications Antennas

June 12, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Trivec-Avant Corp., Huntington Beach, Calif., and Antenna Research Associates Inc., Beltsville, Md., were awarded a maximum $10 million, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for nine types of ultrahigh frequency satellite communications antennas to be used in various configurations by special operations forces. The U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity. 

Raydon to Deliver Driver Trainer Systems

June 12, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Raydon Corporation, Port Orange, Fla., announced today it was awarded a multi-year contract with a value in excess of $40 million from the Army’s Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation to design, develop and deliver common driver trainer systems for a variety of tactical vehicles. The Common Driver Trainer system consists of virtual trainers, which will be used to train members of the armed forces in the operation of the combat vehicles being fielded to Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and to bases in both Korea and Japan, as well as technical refresh to existing common driver trainer systems fielded through the United States.

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