SIGNALScape

U.S. Navy Modifies Anti-Submarine Warfare Contract

March 27, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training, Syracuse, N.Y., is being awarded a $17,179,793 modification to previously awarded contract for the procurement of a one year option for fiscal 2013 AN/SQQ-89 anti-submarine warfare engineering services. This includes development and fielding of the AN/SQQ-89A(V)15 advanced capability builds 11 and 13 systems hosted on technical insertion 12 hardware. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Receives Electronic Warfare Contract Modification

March 27, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Lockheed Martin Corp., Liverpool, N.Y., is being awarded a $30,550,000 modification to previously awarded contract to exercise the firm-fixed-price options for the Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 2 System low-rate initial production units. The SEWIP is an evolutionary acquisition program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) Electronic Warfare System. The SEWIP Block 2 will greatly improve the receiver/antenna group necessary to keep capabilities current with the pace threats and to yield improved system integration. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Sandia Starts Multiple High-Tech Projects with Caterpillar

March 27, 2013

Sandia National Laboratories has signed an umbrella Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Caterpillar Incorporated that covers multiple projects over the next three years. Though Caterpillar is best known for large construction and mining equipment, the CRADA authorizes work in computer and computational science, information and data analysis, mathematics, engineering science and high-performance computing. Technical categories covered by the agreement include simulation design exploration, advanced analytics, multiphysics engineering modeling and simulation, and high-performance computing. Caterpillar is seeking help from Sandia to develop advanced modeling and simulation technologies for virtual product development. Sandia has several technology partnership options that industry, nonprofits, government and academia can use to access the laboratories’ resources.

Cool App-titude: DOSCareers

March 26, 2013
By Rachel Eisenhower

Interested in pursuing a career with the U.S. State Department? The department's Office of Recruitment, Examination and Employment released a free app in March, which educates aspiring Foreign Service candidates and others interested in diplomatic careers.

DOSCareers, available for both Android and iOS, includes career path descriptions; videos of employees in specific career tracks; sample questions from the Foreign Service Officer Tests; an overview of the hiring process; and free study resources, among other materials.

The State Department created the app to reach potential candidates with diverse backgrounds across the United States.

Details on the app are available at careers.state.gov/doscareers. Download the free app from Google Play or the iTunes App Store.

U.S. citizenship is required for State Department careers.

These sites are not affiliated with AFCEA or SIGNAL Magazine, and we are not responsible for the content or quality of the products offered. When visiting new websites, please use proper Internet security procedures.

Cyber Investigators Analyze South Korea Malware

March 25, 2013

The malware that infiltrated computer systems across South Korea’s banking and television broadcast industries on March 20 shares similarities with the Shamoon program used last year to wipe clean the hard drives of 30,000 Saudi Aramco workstations, according to experts at General Dynamics Fidelis Cybersecurity Solutions. Investigators at the company’s newly-opened cyber forensics laboratory in Columbia, Maryland, say the malware is not a Shamoon variant, but that the two programs share some characteristics.

Company officials acknowledge the speculation that North Korea launched the attacks but did not comment on the program’s origin. It is not unusual, they say, for a criminal group or nation to use malware that deliberately mimics attacks used by others. Doing so, of course, casts suspicion elsewhere, helping to mask the malware’s true origins. “A number of commercial firms were hit with a somewhat similar attack. It was not Shamoon. But the techniques were somewhat similar,” says Jim Jaeger, the company’s vice president of cybersecurity services.

Cyber lab personnel identified the South Korea malware as “239ed75323.exe,” a malicious file capable of wiping data in disk drives. One of the areas it targets is the disk’s master boot record, without which a computer cannot load its operating system. The program writes a pattern to the disk that repeats the word “HASTATI.” Hastati is an apparent reference to a class of infantry in the armies of the early Roman Republic that originally fought as spearmen and later as swordsmen. The malware did not overwrite the entire disk, so some data can be recovered. The cyber lab experts posted their initial findings in a blog the day after the attacks.

 

Guest Blog: Budget Impact on Developing COTS Systems

March 25, 2013
By Michael Carter

The current driving force in the military and defense environment is to keep legacy systems operating longer, or the replacement of legacy systems with new systems that emulate one or more legacy systems with commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology. However, there is insufficient budget to fund development of these COTS systems, and the burden of development falls upon private industry. The current sequestration environment adds another burden on industry to perform to the needs of the military, but without the benefit of nonrecurring engineering (NRE) costs being reimbursed. Programs although already funded (but not the NRE, as it is not initially funded) are being put on hold, cancelled, or are in a state of non-deterministic outcome.

Military and defense program managers and private industry face an uphill battle to find the intersection of needs, available resources and the expenditure of development costs. Small companies are at a distinct disadvantage when they develop technology to support the replacement of legacy systems when they are forced to use their own development resources without compensation and are not awarded a contract for production.

Whether a fixed-price, cost-plus, or IDIQ contract, the above scenario is increasingly commonplace in the face of budget constraints and sequestration. The burden on small companies doesn’t stop there; military program managers are also demanding engineering support without compensation for engineering-sustaining efforts, again without the presence of a production contract.

Although many systems are characterized as COTS, there are demands on the developer to perform military environment qualification testing, again without funding and no guarantee of a production contract.

EDO to Upgrade Magnetic Minesweeping System

March 25, 2013
George I. Seffers
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EDO Corp., Panama City, Fla., is being awarded a $10,984,400 firm-fixed-price contract to build and deliver one MK-105 Mod 4 Magnetic Minesweeping System for the Airborne Mine Countermeasures Program. This system upgrade provides a significant reliability and performance improvement to the current MK-105, increasing the Navy's capability to conduct quick response, high-speed airborne mine countermeasures for the next decade. The Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division, Panama City, Fla., is the contracting activity.

Airtec to Provide ISR Support to U.S. Army Southern Command

March 25, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Airtec Inc., California, Md., is being awarded a $12,500,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) services in support of the Army's Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). The contractor will provide ISR services utilizing two contractor-owned, contractor-operated aircraft, with government furnished property previously installed on the aircraft. The Naval Air Warfare Center, Lakehurst, N.J., is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Receives Electronic Warfare Funding

March 25, 2013
George I. Seffers
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Lockheed Martin Corp., Liverpool, N.Y., is being awarded a $27,399,999 modification to previously awarded contract to exercise and restructure the fixed-price-incentive-options for the Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 2 System long-lead-material to firm-fixed-price options. SEWIP is an evolutionary acquisition program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) Electronic Warfare System. The SEWIP Block 2 will greatly improve the receiver/antenna group necessary to keep capabilities current with the pace of the threat and to yield improved system integration. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

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