SIGNALScape

U.S. Air Force Awards $950 Million Remotely Piloted Aircraft Support Contract

November 16, 2012
George I. Seffers
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Battlespace Flight Services LLC, Arlington, Va., is being awarded a $950 million indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract for organizational level maintenance support of remotely piloted aircraft. The program supports Air Combat Command, the Air National Guard, and other major command and combatant command customers to sustain the combat and training capability at tasked locations worldwide. The contracting activity is Air Combat Command, Newport News, Va.

URS to Support Electronic Warfare

November 16, 2012
George I. Seffers
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URS Federal Technical Services Inc., Germantown Md., is being awarded a maximum value $7,893,315 fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for engineering, technical, and programmatic support for the Spectrum Electronic Warfare Department of Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind. Spectrum Electronic Warfare Department’s primary focus areas are in direct support of airborne electronic defense, airborne electronic attack, maritime, and expeditionary divisions. This contract is a continuation of current services, pending the competitive award of follow-on support. Contract support tasks include: research and development support; system engineering and process engineering; modeling, simulation, and analysis; prototyping, pre-production, model-making and fabrication support; system design documentation and technical data support; software engineering, development, programming and network support; reliability, maintainability and availability; human factors, performance and usability engineering; system safety engineering; configuration management; quality assurance; interoperability, test & evaluation, trials; logistics; supply and provisioning; training; and program support. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity.

U.S. Navy Awards Potential $899 Million for Battlespace Awareness

November 16, 2012
George I. Seffers
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Booz Allen Hamilton, McLean, Va.; CACI Technologies Inc., Chantilly, Va.; Centurum Inc., Marlton, N.J.; L-3 Services Inc., Mount Laurel, N.J.; Lockheed Martin Corp. IS&GS, Herndon, Va.; SAIC Inc., McLean, Va.; and Scientific Research Corp., Atlanta, Ga., are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee, with provisions for fixed-price-incentive (firm target) and firm-fixed-price task orders, performance based contract for the procurement of battle-space awareness support services including the development, integration, and test of intelligence, battlespace awareness, and information operations applications and dedicated hardware. The cumulative, estimated value of the base year is $179,912,000. These contracts include options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of these contracts to an estimated $899,560,000. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic, Charleston, S.C., is the contracting activity.

Rockwell Receives High Frequency Radio Funds

November 16, 2012
George I. Seffers
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Rockwell Collins Inc., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is being awarded a $10,947,863 firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to procure up to a maximum of 41 ARC-243 High Frequency Radio System including 200 hours of associated engineering support. The ARC-243 HF radio system includes the receiver exciter, antenna coupler, power supply and associated mounts. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, N.J., is the contracting activity.

U.S. Navy Awards C4I Contract

November 16, 2012
George I. Seffers
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BAE Systems Technology Solutions and Services Inc., Rockville, Md., is being awarded a $19,364,649 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for services in support of the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division’s Integrated Communication and Information Systems Division. Services provided will support the design, integration, testing, installation, training, and certification of shipboard command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) electronic communication systems; the design and integration of like systems at shore sites associated with the deployment of fleet support to surface combatants; and the design, testing, installation, training and certification of mobile and airborne C4I electronic communication systems designed to interface with the C4I electronic architecture of surface ships. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Notes On Intelligence – New Chair, Continuing Challenges

Sept 2012
Bill Nolte

            I did not want to finish my term as chair of the Intelligence Committee without providing a few parting thoughts.  First of all, my thanks to AFCEA and Kent Schneider for continuing to sponsor and support the committee.  It is an important activity, recognized as such by everyone in the intelligence profession.  Secondly, I, along with every other AFCEAN with an interest in intelligence, owe an enormous debt to Steve Ritchey and his staff, for all he and they do to make this committee functional.  They allow the members to think from time that we are responsible for the committee’s success, but we know better.  And I need both to thank and congratulate my longtime friend, colleague, and now successor, Maureen Baginski.  Mo’s record of innovation and leadership speaks for itself;  I leave the chair in good hands.
               Finally, let me thank the committee members – past and present – I’ve served with over the years.  Sometimes I hear it said that serving in the public sector is somehow nobler than serving in the corporate world, and I’ve simply never accepted that.  Different rewards?  Yes.  Perhaps a different manner of service?  Yes again.  But my experience with the committee’s members and its government liaison representatives convinces me the motive to serve remains the same.  That experience leads me to remind my students (over and over, they would probably say) that they can perform public service in the private sector as well as in government.    
            The American intelligence establishment, as with the rest of the national security structure, faces enormous challenges ahead, generated by the operating and information environments they face and by difficult budgetary circumstances.

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