Asia-Pacific

November 2000
By Alec Umansky

High bandwidth, portable transmission systems quicken communications.

The Australian army is taking advantage of technology that consumers recognize as a faster way to connect to the Internet. To enhance their communications capabilities in the field, the service is collaborating with industry to design equipment that meets its specialized needs. The system has broad applications across a spectrum of other fields, including transportation and energy resources.

November 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Despite its vastness, when it comes to cyberspace, it is a small world after all.

The U.S. Pacific Command is cultivating a variety of technological tools that would bring coalition partners into permanent wide area networks and support the numerous partnerships in the vast region. Enhanced connectivity within the U.S. military forces and improved links for foreign nations will support the United States’ primary mission in the Asia-Pacific region—ensuring security in an area of the world that continues to build up its armaments.

November 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Shared communications capabilities bolster unified efforts.

U.S. military forces on the Korean peninsula are mobilizing the power of technology to nurture a partnership that has been more than 50 years in the making. The unique nature of the Korean theater of operations has prompted the combined and joint commands in that area to fine-tune information systems to meet their distinct requirements.

November 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The common operational picture (COP) of the northeastern United States on the High Resolution COP Display System includes all of the aircraft in the air at a specific time. Each airplane is tagged with an identifier and information about its heading, speed and altitude.
System helps clear the fog in area of responsibility.

November 2004
By James C. Bussert

 
Although Russian Sovremenny large missile destroyers are more than 20 years old, the models that China has purchased add state-of-the-art antisubmarine warfare (ASW) sensors and helicopters to the People’s Liberation Army Navy.
The People’s Republic takes a serious approach to undersea activities.

October 2001
By John Di Genio

Information dominance is the counter to a swift, sudden North Korean invasion of South Korea.

Almost 50 years after the end of the Korean War, Korea remains one of the world’s flash points—a place where the flames of the Cold War have yet to be fully extinguished. Although progress has been made during the recent North-South summit in Korea, North Korea still maintains one of the largest forward-deployed armies in the world. Its offensive posture, coupled with its recent development of ballistic missiles, lethal special operations forces and weapons of mass destruction, causes the Korean peninsula to be very volatile.

October 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

As economies improve, Pacific states resume purchasing military equipment.

Arms sales in Southeast Asia are returning to levels that existed prior to the region’s 1997 financial crash. Procurement plans that had been frozen because of the economic turmoil have been reactivated as area nations seek to acquire items such as military aircraft, communications systems and warships. Although these purchases reflect steady improvement in a number of national economies, some countries remain gripped by fiscal and political crises.

November 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

U.S. forces in Asia-Pacific region walk the boards into the 21st century.

Communications system upgrades planned for the Korean theater will support network-centric warfare, transforming the Asia-Pacific region into a cutting-edge digital environment in both theory and practice. Armed with a vision of how information technology creates a common operational understanding of the battlespace, military leaders on the Korean peninsula are using lessons of the past to chart a new course for the future.

November 2002
By James C. Bussert

November 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

The largest unified combatant command region offers different perspectives of the same view.

Already tasked with maintaining a steady menu of operations covering one-third of the Earth’s surface, the U.S. Pacific Command now is fully engaged in the war on terrorism. The command is fighting disparate al Qaida groups in different countries concurrent with supporting operation Enduring Freedom in the Afghanistan region.

September 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Event reveals challenges that lie ahead in coalition environments.

Warfighters may experience some frustration as well as exhilaration in the network-centric environment. Today’s multinational exploration of emerging technologies has uncovered some new challenges that military forces face as they push the envelope on new capabilities. More than a decade of systematically examining technical interoperability issues has led to smoother execution of the technology demonstration and maturation process and realistic expectations on the part of both industry and the military.

October 2003
By James C. Bussert

Facilities in the South China Sea reflect technologies otherwise hidden.

As with other maritime forces, China has been seeking to network disparate assets, and to meet that requirement, it has been establishing signal stations on islands and atolls throughout the South China Sea. These facilities, which range from communications relays to radar units, both demonstrate China’s expanding regional reach and provide a rare glimpse of the country’s military electronics technologies.

October 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Interoperability, reliability key to theater force connectivity.

Bandwidth and interoperability concerns have forced the U.S. military in the Pacific theater to rely on flexible communications networks to maintain connectivity across the expansive region. Because of geographical constraints and limited infrastructure in many parts of the theater, the U.S. military transports and maintains agile satellite-based networks capable of operating with local coalition units.

October 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Readiness, cooperation vital for missions across Asia.

In the event of a major crisis or conflict in the Pacific theater, U.S. forces may have to rely on regional allies to respond quickly and effectively. Relationships between the United States and its allies are maintained through continuous exercises and training events emphasizing collaborative decision-making and command and control. The U.S. military enhances its situational awareness by being aware of the sensitivities, culture and history of nations’ in this part of the world. This also serves to promote cooperation and coordination with local forces.

October 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Command says aloha to state-of-the-art facility.

When U.S. Pacific Command personnel move into their new headquarters building early next year, they will be doing more than just shifting operations to a different location. Featuring an architectural style that is harmonious with the surrounding Hawaiian landscape, the Nimitz-MacArthur Pacific Command Center will be filled with cutting-edge technology that will project the staff’s virtual presence across the Asia-Pacific theater. It has been designed to support Joint Vision 2010 operational concepts.

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