Supporting Our Veterans

March 25, 2009
By Rita Boland

Updated on 1/15/10: The My Soldier program is no longer operational; however, for those who are still interested in supporting the troops through letters and care packages, another excellent option is the Adopt a U.S. Soldier program. The Adopt a U.S. Soldier organization allows citizens to support troops by sending e-mails, letters and packages. You can obtain more information and register for the program at http://www.adoptaussoldier.org/preregistration.htm. The programs listed on these pages are not affiliated with our publication or association.

March 4, 2009
By Rita Boland

Dust off those bikes, take them out of the garage and get rolling for a great cause! Face of America 2009 begins April 25 in Bethesda, Maryland, to raise awareness of service members injured in the line of duty. The 110-mile bike ride, which ends April 26 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, also raises funds for World TEAM (The Exceptional Athlete Matters) Sports, an organization that strives to increase awareness, acceptance and integration of people with disabilities through sports. Face of America focuses specifically on disabled veterans by reaching out and actively including troops who have been severely injured in Iraq and Afghanistan.

March 1, 2009
By Henry Kenyon

Wounded, ill and injured military members and their families are often in need of financial and medical resources as they recover. The National Resource Directory (NRD) home page provides information on and access to a range of medical and non-medical services and resources. The site offers links to affiliated programs such as the Wounded Warrior Resource Center, which offers information about local military facilities, health care services and benefits. Another asset is the Recovery Coordination Program designed to improve the care, management and transition assistance for wounded, sick and injured military personnel.

February 20, 2009
By Henry Kenyon

Sentinels of Freedom awards scholarships to wounded veterans-but this money does not lead to a degree. Instead, the organization provides "life scholarships" in an effort to help the injured readjust to civilian life and their new physical challenges. Through donations of time, money, goods and scholarships, veterans receive housing, transportation and employment and education assistance. They also are connected to a team of volunteers that provides guidance, mentoring and friendship during a four-year program.

February 19, 2009
By Rita Boland

Dust off those bikes, take them out of the garage and get rolling for a great cause! Face of America 2009 begins April 25 in Bethesda, Maryland, to raise awareness of service members injured in the line of duty. The 110-mile bike ride, which ends April 26 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, also raises funds for World TEAM (The Exceptional Athlete Matters) Sports, an organization that strives to increase awareness, acceptance and integration of people with disabilities through sports. Face of America focuses specifically on disabled veterans by reaching out and actively including troops who have been severely injured in Iraq and Afghanistan.

November 21, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

In another example of how the military community can receive help through military organizations, the U.S. Defense Department has released a comprehensive handbook (PDF link) outlining compensation and other benefits service members and their families are entitled to after separating or retiring from the military because of serious injury and illness. The departments of Veterans Affairs, Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, as well as the Social Security Administration, cooperated on the book's development.

November 7, 2008
By Henry Kenyon

Honor Flight Chicago is a little different from most veteran support organizations, and it proves there is no end to the ways people can make a difference in the lives of those who served. The program flies World War II veterans from Chicago Midway Airport to Dulles International Airport and then takes them by bus to see the World War II Memorial erected in Washington, D.C., in their honor. After spending two hours there and eating a box lunch, the group continues to the Korean and Vietnam war memorials and the Iwo Jima Memorial. If time allows, veterans receive a tour of Washington as well. Everyone flies home later the same day.

October 30, 2008
By Rita Boland

Patriot Paws trains dogs to work with injured military members and other disabled persons to help restore physical and emotional freedoms. The organization provides high-quality service dogs for the minimum possible price to those who need them. Any physically disabled U.S. veteran or other American with mobile disabilities can apply for a Patriot Paws service dog by downloading the application form online or requesting one by mail. The necessary contact information is listed on the Web site. When an application is accepted, applicants are interviewed, and the organization makes every effort to find a compatible pet.

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