surveillance and reconnaissance

August 12, 2014

Brig. Gen. John T. Rauch Jr., USAF, has been assigned as director of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance strategy, plans, doctrine and force development, Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Pentagon, Washington, D.C.

July 14, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army’s Project Manager of Robotic Systems Joint Project Office, Warren, Michigan, is conducting market research to see what companies can provide a lightweight common robotic system (CRS) for dismounted soldiers.

May 22, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Just as the U.S. Navy initially resisted the transition from sail to steam-powered ships and elements of the Army dismissed air power and fought against the shift from horses to tanks, some parts of the military continue to resist the expansion of uninhabited systems into traditional combat roles. As a result, the U.S. Defense Department is failing to invest in game-changing technology that could increase efficiencies and save lives, according to a just-released report from the Center for a New American Security.

March 27, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Thales recently announced the company has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Qatar Armed Forces to assist in the development of an Optionally Piloted Vehicle-Aircraft (OPV-A), a high-performance intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance system. The OPV-A will be a hybrid between a conventional and unmanned aircraft capable of flying with or without a pilot on board. Unimpeded by a human’s physiological limitations, an OPV-A is able to operate under more adverse conditions and/or for greater endurance times. The airframe, to be selected by the Qatar Armed Forces, will be integrated with a mission systems capability to enable the optionally piloted capability.

July 16, 2012
By George Seffers

Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia, was awarded a $14,338,925 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance services in Afghanistan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, Mississippi, is the contracting activity.

March 1, 2012
By George Seffers

AAI Corporation, Hunt Valley, Maryland; CSC, Falls Church, Virginia; and Insitu Incorporated, Bingen, Washington, are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award contract for unmanned aircraft system (UAS) intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) services in support of the Department of Defense and other government agencies, as well as potential coalition military Foreign Military Sales customers. There are two separate performance-based work statements; one for sea-based requirements, and one for land-based requirements.

February 10, 2012
By George Seffers

Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, San Diego, California, is being awarded a potential $89,447,206 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee, multiple award contract to provide research, development, test, and evaluation of emerging surveillance technologies, sensors and systems with potential for applicability in the areas of air, ground, and shipboard intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance and information operations systems. Stanley Associates Incorporated, Fairfax, Virgina, is being awarded a a potential $77,775,689. General Dynamics Information Technology Incorporated, Fairfax, Virginia, could receive as much as $76,559,590.

August 8, 2011
By George Seffers

Jorge Scientific Corporation, Arlington, Virginia, was awarded about $8 million for the research, development, and demonstration of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, munitions detection, and counter-improvised explosive device technological solutions to address deficiencies. Work will be performed in Afghanistan. There were 999 bids solicited, with 999 bids received. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

May 6, 2011
By George Seffers

Contrack International Incorporated, McLean, Virginia, has been awarded a $34 million contract for the design and construction of an intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance complex in Shindand, Afghanistan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Middle East District, Winchester, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

April 5, 2011
By George Seffers

Rockwell Collins Incorporated, Government Systems, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was awarded a $13 million contract to provide for the logistic and fielding support for the Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Network. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama is the contracting activity.

January 12, 2011
By George Seffers

Modus Operandi, Melbourne, Florida has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command to develop a system that identifies critical words and phrases for intelligence analysis, and maintains lists of these key words. The Vocabulary - Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (V-ISR) project, will address the challenges associated with processing overwhelming amounts of intelligence data. The V-ISR project will use advanced, machine-learning techniques to recognize new terms and automatically categorize them within lists that will be constantly updated.

December 29, 2010
By George Seffers

The Boeing Company, St. Louis, Missouri, was recently awarded a $68 million contract for full-motion video from commercial unmanned air intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms across Iraq. Work will be completed in Baghdad, Iraq. U.S. Central Command, Contracting Command, Baghdad, Iraq, is the contracting activity.

November 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers
SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific personnel and sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit ONE retrieve an unmanned underwater vehicle deployed to detect mines and improvised explosives in shallow water environments.

As the U.S. Navy modernizes information systems across the fleet, one organization is responsible for researching, developing and fielding the full range of technologies in the Asia-Pacific region, providing complete life cycle development and support for systems, from concept to fielded capability.

October 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers
Unmanned air vehicles, such as the Global Hawk, can provide full-motion video and other intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data directly special operators equipped with the NG-TacMN.

U.S. Defense Department and interagency special operators are scheduled to begin receiving new tactical mesh networking equipment this month. The kit provides a mobile, ad hoc, self-healing network that offers a full range of situational awareness data, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance feeds, blue force tracking and a voice over Internet protocol capability.

October 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers
TRACER is a lightweight, low-frequency synthetic-aperture radar that can peer through foliage, rain, darkness, dust storms, or atmospheric haze to provide real-time, high-quality tactical ground imagery. Lockheed Martin announced in 2012 the system has been integrated into a modular pod for airborne testing on a Blackhawk helicopter or a Predator-B aircraft.

Fiscal year 2015 marks the official kickoff of a U.S. Army program to develop a foliage-penetrating radar that will simultaneously locate still objects and track moving objects from a fast-moving fixed-wing aircraft. The next-generation system is designed specifically for jungle environments such as the Asia-Pacific region, South America and Africa, and by combining multiple capabilities onto one platform, it will allow the service to cut down the number of sensors currently needed.

September 1, 2014
By Rita Boland

The United States is in the midst of preparing its largest intelligence hub outside of its own national borders. The center will accommodate operations with reach into several global areas, including those rife with anti-terrorism operations. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being poured into the work that includes consolidating resources from other installations.

August 8, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Systems entered in the U.S. Navy’s 17th annual RoboSub competition, held July 28-Aug. 3, are far more sophisticated than the toys that competed in the first competition, which was launched in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

“In the earlier days when we first did this, the systems were considered to be some kind of toys,” says Steve Koepenick, an autonomous systems expert with the Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, which hosts the competition. “They are now tools. They’re part of the kit that our sailors and Marines take into theater with them. That’s reflected in the competition and the things the students are trying to do.”

September 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers
A NATO soldier launches a Prox Dynamics PD-100 nanocopter. The U.S. Army is using the system as a surrogate while developing the Cargo Pocket Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance system.

The U.S. Army is preparing—for the first time—to develop and field micro robotic systems under programs of record, indicating confidence that the technology has matured and years of research are paying off. The small systems will provide individual soldiers and squads with critical intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data in jungles, buildings and caves that larger systems can’t reach. Ideally, they will become valued combat team members.

July 18, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The U.S. Navy's pet project for a carrier-launched unmanned aerial vehicle came under fire by experts this week, who told a congressional subcommittee that the sea service’s proposal is redundant, already obsolete and will leave naval forces with a vulnerable platform.

The Navy has dedicated years toward the creation of what it calls a "persistent, aircraft carrier-based intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, targeting and strike capability to support carrier air wing operations" platform, which has become known as the Unmanned Carrier-Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) system.

July 16, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Marine Corps Warfighting Lab this week wrapped up an Advanced Warfighting Experiment (AWE) in the jungles of Hawaii, which tested a total of 16 systems including unmanned ground vehicles. The experiment was part of the July 9 -14 Rim of the Pacific exercise and could help determine how future Marine forces will fight and which technologies they will use.

The experiment included Marines aboard Navy ships as well as three company landing teams, a relatively new organization construct for the service. The company landing teams are altered rifle companies and represent a different approach to the Battalion Landing Team.

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