U.S. Army Research Laboratory

March 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
A soldier with the 1st Infantry Division provides security during exercise Allied Spirit VII in Hohenfels, Germany. In the future, the trees surrounding the soldier may be used as networked sensors if work underway at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) bears fruit.

Native plant life could join traffic cameras, motion detectors and enemy sensor systems as future sources of battlefield information if the U.S. Army Research Laboratory has its way. The laboratory is applying the Internet of Things approach to theater command, control, communications, computers and intelligence as it plans to equip soldiers and their leaders with vital knowledge from nontraditional information sources, and it is leaving no stone—or crop—unturned in its efforts.

September 22, 2016
By Julianne Simpson

Scientists with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory discovered what officials have touted as a startling new finding for jet engine technology in their search for nanomaterials.

The researchers stabilized a copper alloy microstructure and found it to be strong at very high temperatures, a key discovery because the Defense Department depends on jet turbine engines that can operate at high temperatures and maintain structural strength. The potential materials applications could be huge, including inside turbine engines, where temperatures can rise to more than 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit.

May 27, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

Analysts and warfighters may not have to sift through reams of footage from a stationary surveillance system if the camera itself is programmed to determine exactly what's happening within its view. Maryann Lawlor's article, "Seeing Eye Systems Learn to Discern," in this issue of SIGNAL Magazine, describes the Mind's Eye program, a visual intelligence project underway at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in cooperation with the U.S.

November 19, 2012
By George I. Seffers
Ronald E. Meyers delves into quantum physics research at the U. S. Army Research Laboratory. Meyers, fellow researcher Keith Deacon and Gert Cauwenberghs, a professor of bioengineering and biology at the University of California at San Diego, earned a patent for a futuristic neural computer chip.