unmanned ground vehicles

July 1, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
Roboteam’s Zachary Lucas maneuvers the PROBOT Military Robot, a lightweight, all-terrain carrier and reconnaissance robot that hauls three times its own weight and allows hands-free operation. The adaptable plug-and-play platform can conform to troops’ missions to carry explosives, equipment, weapons and even troops themselves.

Robots have done their fair share of safeguarding troops on the battlefield, from defusing bombs to scouting out caves for insurgents. In spite of their success, or perhaps because of it, the U.S. Defense Department now wants its unmanned ground vehicles to be more than one-trick ponies. 

May 26, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
An Estonian soldier tests the THeMIS unmanned ground vehicle during a spring battlefield exercise.

Machine has not quite fully replaced man yet, but a new development in unmanned technology is coming close. An emerging system successfully tested in Europe this spring might help keep infantry troops safer while also lightening their transport load. 

The Tracked Hybrid Modular Infantry System, or THeMIS, developed by Estonia-based company Milrem, is an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) that can be adapted to a number of battlefield missions, from logistical support to reconnaissance and surveillance, border patrol, medical evacuation and high-technology weapon systems.

May 27, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

Analysts and warfighters may not have to sift through reams of footage from a stationary surveillance system if the camera itself is programmed to determine exactly what's happening within its view. Maryann Lawlor's article, "Seeing Eye Systems Learn to Discern," in this issue of SIGNAL Magazine, describes the Mind's Eye program, a visual intelligence project underway at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in cooperation with the U.S.