DISA

August 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

 

Despite small pockets of resistance, officials across the U.S. Defense Department and military services support the convergence of multiple networks into one common, shared, global network. Lessons learned from the theater of operations indicate the need for the joint environment, which will provide enterprise services such as email, Internet access, common software applications and cloud computing.

July 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) command center at Fort Meade, Maryland, is the focal point for the agency’s efforts to maintain network connectivity throughout the U.S. defense community. DISA’s information assurance work has taken a new turn as capabilities such as commercial communications technologies and the cloud have altered the cyberscape.

From handheld
 to the cloud,
 new technologies are driving new approaches to data assurance.

The increasing use of readily available and inexpensive commercial technologies by the military is changing the way the Defense Information Systems Agency provides information assurance. As these technologies are integrated into the Defense Department information infrastructure, the agency is adjusting its approaches to providing security for its networks and the data that reside on them.

June 26, 2013
By George I. Seffers

Cyber Symposium 2013 Online Show Daily, Day 2

The Joint Information Environment (JIE) took center stage during the second day of the AFCEA International Cyber Symposium in Baltimore. The conference devoted one full panel to the joint environment, but presenters throughout the day stressed the JIE’s importance to the future of the U.S. military and coalition partners, discussed some of the challenges to achieving the vision and vowed that the department will make it happen despite any remaining obstacles.

June 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
A U.S. Air Force network administrator employs a laptop at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan.

Dealing with virtual challenges may require a meeting of different disciplines.

May 24, 2013
By Max Cacas

The Defense Department is teaming up with a well-known cloud computing giant to resolve security concerns.

Over the next several months, the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) will partner with Google to learn how to implement critical security capabilities in a cloud computing environment. The pilot program, involving selected members of DISA’s staff, will explore how the U.S. Defense Department will implement security when it begins to offer cloud computing services to the military in the future.

March 26, 2013
By Max Cacas

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has begun internal discussions regarding a multiaward contract for cloud computing services.

Anthony Montemarano, DISA’s director of strategic planning and information, told a briefing of industry leaders Monday that he and his agency are firm believers in cloud computing. “When you look at some of the functions that we perform in government, a lot of it can be provided in the commercial cloud. We have to come to grips with the value proposition,” he explains. He believes that the Defense Department’s cloud computing strategy must include DISA cloud resources, commercial cloud services and privately owned cloud services where appropriate.

March 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
The Warfighter Information Network-Tactical equipment is set up during a Network Integration Evaluation at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico.

Officials work to provide a new cloud approach across 
the service as well as the Defense Department.

U.S. Army officials estimate that by the end of the fiscal year, they will go into production on a new cloud computing solution that could potentially be made available across the Defense Department and could eventually be used to expand cloud capabilities on the battlefield. The platform-as-a-service product incorporates enhanced automation, less expensive software licensing and built-in information assurance.

September 12, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Defense customers are driving change; this effort tries to map the future.

The new Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) strategic plan lines up many of the diverse information technology thrusts that are whirring throughout the Defense Department, according to an agency official. Tony Montemarano, director for strategic planning and information at DISA, states that the plan’s main goal is to codify where DISA is headed. This direction is fueled by demand signals from the Defense Department, particularly in high-mileage areas such as the Joint Information Environment, mobility initiatives and cloud services.

May 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

May 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A U.S. Marine Corps sergeant communicates position information while on patrol in Helmand province, Afghanistan. The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is striving to replace service-oriented standards with joint requirements to improve interoperability and technology innovation.

May 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

August 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

Success of a new satellite contracting approach may hinge on efficiencies.

The U.S. Defense Information Systems Agency is beginning a major scrub of user requirements as it proceeds with its new commercial satellite services acquisition process. The communications agency is taking a hard look at thousands of customer requirements to determine the validity of some against the necessity of others.

April 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

A U.S. soldier sets up a satellite communications antenna for voice and data tactical communications during rescue and relief efforts in Haiti. The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is restructuring its infosphere to allow users at the edge to access and share the information that they need in the form that they want.

April 2010
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

April 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

Fuel is now the network’s newest tracking target; others to follow.

With fuel serving as the ammunition of the mobile force, the Defense Information Systems Agency has created a new capability that allows logisticians to track and manage different types of this valuable resource. A new version of the agency’s Web-based Global Combat Support System-Joint has been deployed to fulfill this top priority of the U.S. Central Command J-4.

April 2009
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Soldiers radio in their location and enemy contact results during a search for a sniper in Sadr City, Baghdad, Iraq. Because the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is delivering more services to the tactical edge, the agency must consider the distinct requirements of warfighters in the field.
Agency seeks to create balance between agility and oversight.

May 2008
By Rita Boland

Military development organization wants more private sector involvement and is blazing a trail toward more sharing and open dialogue.

The Defense Information Systems Agency has transformed its acquisition policy over the past several years, and the success of the new method has resulted in cost savings and faster deployments of capabilities. As new programs—both large and small—advance, the agency plans to be as open as possible with industry in an effort to create synergy that will generate the best solutions.

May 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Two U.S. Air Force airmen control aircraft flying cover for ground operations in Iraq. The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is working to extend its joint network capabilities to the tactical edge.
Information agency aims to move new capabilities to the tactical edge.

May 2008
By Rita Boland

 
Two airmen work in a communications van at a forward location. The Net-Centric Enabled Services content discovery and delivery product line saves deployed troops time and bandwidth because they are able to cache and store information locally. 
Capabilities that significantly alter how the military and its partners collaborate are poised for their full implementation.

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