SIGNAL Connections

November 17, 2008
by Maryann Lawlor

Organizations seeking ways to improve the bottom line may find their solution in the clouds—cloud computing, that is. The paradigm offers dynamic access to computer processing, network bandwidth and file storage on a pay-per-use basis. Companies as well as government agencies can take advantage of new technologies sooner while spreading their information technology expenditures over a longer period of time. This approach can be especially advantageous for small firms because it gives them access to cutting-edge technology without huge investments.

October 15, 2008
SIGNAL Staff

The explosion of new Web tools increases the usefulness of everyone’s computers but also amplifies the threats to organizations’ network systems. Life behind the corporate firewall may be relatively safe, but once the windows are open to let exciting capabilities in, systems administrators must take extra precautions to ensure that information isn’t leaking out.

October 15, 2008
SIGNAL Staff

The past few years have seen military communications and information systems described in terms ranging from force multiplier to battlespace domain. No one doubts that command, control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) systems have revolutionized warfare. What many people do not realize is just how broad-reaching the changes have been across the spectrum of warfighting.

October 15, 2008
by Maryann Lawlor

Steady progress in communications in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan has dramatically sped up the pace of coalition combat, security, governance and development operations throughout the country. From the tactical perspective, this progress is increasing shared situational awareness and boosting collaboration among nations.

October 15, 2008
by Henry S. Kenyon

October 15, 2008
by B.R. Melton

October 15, 2008
SIGNAL Staff

While the recent focus of military communicators has been on building the Global Information Grid's (GIG’s) fiber optic transport backbone and Internet protocol architecture, the community is only now addressing the highly variable and situationally dependent problem of access. Many different access technologies are already being used at the base level, at forward-deployed fixed bases and at tactical locations. However, variations in mission, bandwidth needs and geography complicate the network access problem.

October 15, 2008
by Denine Phillips

A staggering amount of sensitive information, from personnel reviews to contracts and medical records, traverses the federal government’s computer network. Integral to this information-sharing process is a common network on-ramp, the connected digital copier. No longer the slow analog machine of yesteryear, digital copiers are versatile imaging systems that support stand-alone copying and network-based scanning, faxing and printing. Also referred to as a multifunctional product (MFP), digital copiers utilize network resources to enhance workflow and productivity. At the same time, an MFP poses a unique security challenge.

October 15, 2008
by Katie Packard

AFCEA International is pleased to announce the creation of the new Baghdad Chapter. The chapter’s presence will help further the establishment of a viable network for Iraqi information technology professionals and will serve as a collaborative forum for Iraqi and U.S. industry, government and military personnel.

October 15, 2008
by Katie Packard

The Hampton Roads Chapter hosted “Lunch and Learn,” a new outreach event, in August for the staff of the information

October 15, 2008
SIGNAL Staff

The AFCEA International Small Business Committee’s programs are developed with two small business needs in mind: access and education. The committee provides opportunities to interact with key individuals in government and industry for networking and relationship building. Educational offerings address the skills necessary for small businesses to work more efficiently and grow their organizations.

September 15, 2008
SIGNAL Staff

The Asia-Pacific region has been strategically important to the United States since the country realized it was as much a Pacific nation as it was an Atlantic one. The United States demonstrated that it was a global power when it sent its Great White Fleet to visit faraway countries that many Americans had never visited. Conflicts and colonies followed, and now the nation has many standing defense treaties and a military presence that spans half the globe.

September 15, 2008
by Maryann Lawlor

September 15, 2008
by Maryann Lawlor

Large and small companies may differ in many ways, but when it comes to business development they have a lot in common. Whether a firm has 10 employees or 10,000, it must make sure that the program managers and contracting officers know, like, respect and trust them. One of the few ways to achieve this is by researching the agencies well and building relationships with the people who work in them.

September 15, 2008
by Henry S. Kenyon

Modern Europe depends on information sharing among governments, businesses and individuals. Restructured from the ruins of World War II, institutions such as the European Union and NATO are built on a solid platform of communications between governments and militaries. Information sharing is even more critical in a computerized and networked world. However, while the Internet opens new opportunities and allows vast amounts of information to be passed among organizations, it also creates a host of new challenges.

September 15, 2008
SIGNAL Staff

The Defense Information Systems Agency continues its work to fulfill its vision and strategy in bringing coherence to U.S. Defense Department networks to give warfighters timely access to relevant information. Achieving this goal has led to the Enterprise Information Environment, which provides standards, rules for data accuracy and the framework for placing data on the network as well as governance of information on the network. While the benefits of a multidimensional network are many, the strain this design places on the network structure also can be significant.

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