information operations

October 1, 2012
By Max Cacas

The National Intelligence University prepares for its fifth decade with a shift in focus and a change in venue.

The National Intelligence University, which provides advanced training to U.S. intelligence professionals, is transitioning from an institution primarily focused on the U.S. Defense Department to one serving the entire intelligence community. This reflects the new emphasis toward sharing and collaboration within the nation's intelligence apparatus.

December 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

Government, industry team, look at military solutions.

The danger to the Free World’s information infrastructure has become more sophisticated and widespread, and it now poses a threat to the very economic well-being of the Free World. Economics and national security have become so closely intertwined that both now are facing common threats from global information operations.

December 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Private-sector efforts, such as this Symantec security operations center, must actively support the government by protecting critical assets such as electric and gas grids to provide wider and more flexible national defense.
Shielding critical systems becomes everyone’s responsibility.

December 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Army is developing new operational strategies for its forces to use in cyberspace. These plans will create new occupational specialties and restructure personnel formations to permit the service to operate as effectively in cyberspace as it does on land.
The U.S. Army redefines how it will fight in and across the electromagnetic spectrum.

July 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Joint Information Operations Warfare Command (JIOWC) is responsible for coordinating a variety of information-based capabilities throughout the U.S. Defense Department. The JIOWC manages a range of operations such as deception and
psychological, electronic and cyber warfare.
Data sharing, coordination between commands enhances electronic, cyber combat missions.

August 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
U.S. Army soldiers set out on a sunrise patrol in an east Baghdad neighborhood. The demand for actionable intelligence is growing as U.S. forces confront increasingly resourceful adversaries in urban settings.
More sensors generate more data for more options—if the message gets through to the troops.

December 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Members of the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit escort a speaker-equipped U.S. Army psychological operations high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle through the streets of Khas Oruzgan, Afghanistan, during operation Pegasus. One of the operation’s goals was to disrupt and deter enemy activity in the region.
Support teams provide joint force commanders with nonlethal warfighting options.

December 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Information Operations Technology Alliance (IOTA) is an online knowledge-sharing forum for the information operations community. One of the alliance’s goals is to provide a repository of technology solutions and expertise that warfighters can access.
Documentation aids analysis, operational decisions.

June 1999
By Dr. Jude E. Franklin, Bruce B. Biggs and Darrell L. Ramey

Tomorrow’s capabilities could cut operator involvement in half and reshape the way battles are fought.

June 1999
By Col. Alan D. Campen, USAF (Ret.)

The federal government needs help in defending the homeland.

Not since the second American revolution has the United States had to defend its homeland, yet the country is not much better prepared today than it was when much of Washington, D.C., was torched by an invading military force during the War of 1812.

June 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Designers apply industry-standard components for smoother interfaces, rapid upgrades and easier use.

Integrated signal processors are the buzzword for new electronic warfare suites designed for adaptability across a broad range of threat environments. Embedding these commercial off-the-shelf devices in sea- and airborne signals intelligence platforms both increases interoperability and reduces the likelihood of rapid obsolescence.

June 1999
By David A. Brown

Facility develops electronic scenarios that closely duplicate battlefield, evaluating defensive systems against known and new dangers.

As a first point in the United States’ electronic combat test process, researchers strive to re-create electronic warfare accurately to challenge the effectiveness of hardware against hostile threats. A major link in this process is the U.S. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator in Fort Worth, Texas, which can evaluate defensive systems against most known threats and can respond quickly to newly discovered threats.

July 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Study of security, interoperability and culture finds department behind information superiority curve.

The U.S. Department of Defense is not fully exploiting information technology in military operations and departmental procedures. For an organization that relies on information superiority and technological capabilities to put U.S. national defense at an advantage, the department is lax in thwarting potentially devastating threats to its information systems.

July 1999
By Lt. Col. Glenn D. Watt, USAF

Expanded network connectivity increases risk of sharing mishaps.

While the security industry concentrates on protecting systems from external threats, a danger to information access is brewing from within organizations. The expansion of and growing reliance on networks is jeopardizing military information technology by exposing numerous sectors and even entire commands to errors that are introduced internally by a single entity.

July 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Propaganda war reaches global audience to evoke international activity.

Just as information system users are becoming accustomed to the concept of cyberwar, a new form of information conflict is emerging that rests on a completely different set of principles. Popularly known as netwar, it is based on a strategy of accessing a network, not to destroy it but to maintain and operate it as a tool to gather support and maintain communications.

April 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Services unify efforts to share data.

Although experts agree that the vast majority of future military operations will be fought by joint forces, the U.S. military’s information technology continues to be somewhat fragmented. To take advantage of all the benefits of information operations during a mission, systems used by all the forces and at all levels must be able to talk to each other. Numerous technologies have been developed that enable this capability; however, the challenge is larger than technology.

April 2001
By Christian B. Sheehy

Initiative puts information security and reliability first.

The U.S. Defense Department is refocusing efforts to protect military communications from computer network threats. By shifting its network operations emphasis from exclusively defensive to a more offensive stance, the government seeks to ensure the integrity of coalition operations. Preparations for projecting a greater disruptive potential to adversaries are underway.

March 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Technique provides 64-fold increase in radar sensor utility.

The potential of network-centric operations is growing with the capability to link, interpret, process, manage and share data from multiple sensors in near real time and throughout a battlespace. This information could be delivered directly to a commander’s laptop computer to provide a clearer and more complete picture of detected threats.

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