information operations

March 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

Government seeks novel methods to squeeze the most from crowded radio frequency environment.

Future military communications equipment may one day be able to detect and use locally available radio spectrum automatically. U.S. Defense Department researchers are developing methods that allow systems to scan for unassigned frequency bands autonomously. These technologies will allow warfighters to deploy quickly anywhere in the world without time-consuming spectrum management and allocation concerns.

March 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Significant bandwidth demands accompany breakthrough capabilities.

Satellite communications, Web services and imagery have come of age in the battlespace of operation Enduring Freedom. This first network-centric war has revealed an explosion in capabilities that has been matched by information demands at all levels of command.

March 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Information operations involve more than just digits.

The menu for U.S. Army information operations now runs several courses long as the service integrates low-end news activities directed at local populace with high-end cyberspace defense and attack. As all of these elements come together in a common operational mode, the future cyberwarrior may see netwar visualization capabilities that provide cyberspace situational awareness akin to icon-driven battlefield monitoring systems.

June 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Escalating use of information systems in missions shortens conflicts.

Information operations are coming of age, moving through the exploration stage of adolescence and forward toward a future that some experts believe should feature ubiquitous integration. Although computer systems have already proved their ability to influence the nature of warfare, the maturation of doctrine and technologies is likely to bring with it even more substantial changes in the way the military conducts operations.

June 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

In cyberspace, the best defense is a good offense.

Sky marshals, metal detectors and multiple identification checks may increase security in the corporeal world, but guarding the nation’s information superhighway requires different tactics. And in the information age, homeland security must extend into the digital realm, or even a tiny crack could allow adversaries into some of the most important systems in the world today.

June 2003
By Lt. Gen. Joseph K. Kellogg Jr., USA, and Mark Powell

System facilitates suspicious incident data-sharing.

The U.S. Defense Department is introducing a new tool to protect military installations by transforming force-protection information sharing from a hierarchical, service-centric model to a network-centric model. The system will allow subscribers to have a common awareness of all suspicious events that are taking place in their vicinity.

April 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

Bringing diverse information technology programs together under a single umbrella goes beyond settling on common commercial technologies.

Virtually every piece of military electronics hardware, from the simplest handheld personal computing assistant to the most powerful mainframe computer, faces the challenge of interoperability to fit into the U.S. Defense Department’s Global Information Grid. Designed as the ultimate military networking project, the grid is a cornerstone for achieving the information superiority outlined in the department’s Joint Vision 2010 and Joint Vision 2020.

February 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

Digital clones offer insight about attack and defense strategies.

Solutions to today’s information security challenges may reside in the virtual world. Modeling, simulation and evolutionary computational techniques offer organizations a way to observe how real hackers operate and attack systems. Because tireless computers are doing all the work, data can be gathered around the clock ready for analysts to examine and evaluate.

February 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 

The U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), the combatant command responsible for homeland defense, has established a situational awareness room that is used in operations as well as exercises.

Joint event set to examine interagency information-sharing challenges.

February 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 

IDART has three attach resource centers where team members can set up mock systems to demonstrate concepts for customers. 

Laboratory team goes on the offensive to improve defense.

November 15, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

A revolution quietly erupted in October. On the University of Chicago campus, more than 80 innovators came together to discuss their ideas about how to solve some of the military’s most vexing problems. Not blind to the chain-of-command bureaucracy in which they operate, these pragmatic dreamers passionately moved forward in spite of it, because the Defense Entrepreneurs Forum (DEF) conference provided a place for in-person networking and commiserating, brainstorming and bracing one another up.

September 16, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

AFCEA International’s Corporate Member Only Forum will focus on current and future cybersecurity staff needs. A panel of experts will discuss what it takes to ensure network security through knowledge. Dr. Earnest McDuffie lead for the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education, National Institute of Standards and Technology, will moderate the discussion.

April 15, 2013

SANS NetWars, an interactive security challenge, gives participants the chance to compete while earning continuing education units (CEUs) to help sustain certifications. The event will take place May 15 and 16, 2013, at the Virginia Beach Convention Center during AFCEA’s East: Joint Warfighting event. NetWars is a hands-on computer and network security competition that enables participants to test their experience and skills in a safe, controlled environment.

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