Cybersecurity

October 26, 2016
By Julianne Simpson
Privacy and security settings exist for a reason. Learn about and use the privacy and security settings on social networks.

According to a recent report by cybersecurity developer Forcepoint, millennials might pose as serious a cybersecurity risk to enterprise networks as cyber criminals. The research found that the baby boomer generation, those aged 51 to 69, are more cautious online while the younger work force is more likely to abandon caution in exchange for digital convenience.

October 21, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
DNI James Clapper answers questions asked by guests attending AFCEA’s Emerging Professionals in Intelligence Committee (EPIC) speaker series. The session was moderated by Jesse Nielsen, managing director of VXIT Analytics.

The next 17 days leading up to the presidential election pose a rather vulnerable time for the United States—more so than usual during a transition of power, says Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

“This year, for lots of reasons, people are nervous, particularly for an election cycle that has been sportier than normal,” Clapper shared during at presentation Thursday at AFCEA’s Emerging Professionals in Intelligence Committee (EPIC) speaker series. 

October 17, 2016
By Aubrey Merchant-Dest

Last year, the Defense Department issued the Cybersecurity Culture and Compliance Initiative (DC3I), a memorandum containing alarming statistics on the actual number of successful network compromises and their causes, and principles for guiding daily operations for network users. The good news is that out of 30 million known malicious intrusions occurring over 10 months, 99.9 percent were prevented.

October 5, 2016
By Julianne Simpson

The first week of National Cyber Security Awareness Month focuses on promoting cybersecurity for individuals. However, organizations of all types and sizes, especially small businesses, must be aware of the devastating consequences of a cyber domain attack.

October 1, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
U.S. Army cyber warriors defend the network at the tactical operations center for the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, during a Network Integration Evaluation in fall 2015.

With cyberspace emerging as a critical warfare domain, U.S. military leaders have been forced to dump both old habits and doctrine in the name of network security. These arduous tasks are part of adapting to the new normal of the digital age, which can include contorting Army policies and actions to win modern wars and address global crises, says Essye Miller, the Army’s director of cybersecurity.

By Joe Kim

There is no escaping the barrage of technology and devices ever-present in our modern lives. Consider that many middle school kids today are iPhone-wielding and Fitbit-wearing youngsters.

The public sector workplace is no different. Federal IT professionals must consider the sheer volume and variety of devices connecting to their networks—from fitness wearables to laptops, tablets and smartphones. The Internet of Things and the cloud also significantly impact bandwidth and present security concerns, spurred by incidents such as the Office of Personnel Management breach of 2014.

By Maria Horton

We are little more than halfway through 2016, and it is safe to say that “regulatory compliance” are the cybersecurity buzzwords of the year. Regulatory compliance is not just a government or specialty market issue. Today, it applies to private contractors offering cloud, Internet of Things and other solutions within the federal marketplace. 

August 16, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
A Louisiana Army National Guard chief communications plans officer trains members of the Cyber Defense Incident Response Team to defend the state’s cyber assets in November 2015. Photo courtesy DOD

Information technology modernization has reached a precipice within the federal government as agencies struggle to manage many moving parts and jockey for the same pot of money and talent. Add to the fray the results of a new survey showing an alarming reliance by federal agencies on outdated information technology systems.

August 11, 2016
By John Halksworth

Air gapping is a security measure that isolates a computer or a network so it cannot be accessed or hacked by an external entity. It's a useful technique that adds a security layer for companies and government agencies, especially those handling classified, confidential information often susceptible to hacking attempts. Although air-gapping systems offer extra security, recent malware-based attacks and other threats have created a new set of risks that organizations must manage in unique ways.

August 1, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

The U.S. government wants to hack the hackers—and be able to talk about it. 

In an ambitious effort slated to begin in November, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) plans to delve into developing technologies and processes that would allow authorities to access and then operate inside the networks and systems of cyber adversaries, says Angelos Keromytis, program manager in DARPA’s Information Innovation Office.

July 26, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

As government and businesses struggle to hire and retain highly qualified cybersecurity experts, it just might be time for the people sporting purple mohawks to receive consideration for the coveted jobs, some experts say.

The White House released this month the first-ever Federal Cybersecurity Workforce Strategy that sets in motion aggressive plans to recruit and retain cyber talent, and the Defense Department seeks to loosen for cyber personnel some of its hiring constraints within the civil service system.

July 19, 2016
By Joe Kim

It wasn’t too long ago that the Defense Department embarked on a Cybersecurity Discipline Implementation Plan identifying specific tasks that department’s IT personnel must perform to reinforce basic cybersecurity requirements identified in policies, directives and orders across the agency.

The plan, publicly unveiled in March after being amended, segments tasks into four key “lines of effort” to strengthen cybersecurity initiatives:

July 18, 2016
 

The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate will host two industry days to provide additional insights to the mobile and cellular industry and researchers about the Mobile Threats and Defenses request for information (RFI).

July 14, 2016
 

The U.S. Army is testing how cyberwarriors adjust to morphing cyber threats and electromagnetic warfare (EW) attacks during its Cyber Quest 2016, an exercise now underway at the Cyber Center of Excellence at Fort Gordon, Georgia. The event examines concepts and products that could influence future technologies and requirements as well as other Army and Defense Department exercises and experiments.

July 12, 2016
By Bob Kimball

It’s no exaggeration to say the networking industry is going through a period of near-unprecedented change. The explosion of software defined network (SDN) concepts over the past few years brings great promise for new networking capabilities and increased economies of scale. The rapid adoption of SDN and network functions virtualization (NFV) by global telecommunications service providers will continue to drive the rapid evolution and standardization. Additionally, SDN will bring many benefits to enterprise securities yet to be fully explored or imagined.

A New Security Approach

July 1, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman
Romanian soldiers at a Romanian air base render honors with U.S. forces commemorating the 74th anniversary of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Romania’s growing activities with fellow NATO members include greater information sharing on cyberspace.

A nation that once was part of the Soviet bloc now finds itself on the front lines of unrest in Ukraine, territorial disputes in the Black Sea and state-sponsored attacks in cyberspace. Romania, now a stalwart member of NATO and the European Union, is playing an increasing role in cybersecurity, both regionally and internationally. It is passing a national cybersecurity law and reaching out to assist other nations, directly and indirectly, with cyber defense. 

June 9, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
NATO officials highlight several business initiatives to meet future needs during the NITEC 2016 cyber conference in Tallinn, Estonia. Photo by Marcos Fernandez Marin, NCI Agency

Industry said, “Show me the money,” and NATO obliged.

Officials shared several key business initiatives to meet future NATO needs during the three-day NITEC 2016 cyber conference, informing industry members about 3 billion euros ($3.4 billion) worth of upcoming business opportunities and contract work.

June 9, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Katrin Suder, state secretary at the German Federal Ministry of Defense says cybersecurity is a game changer. Photo by Marcos Fernandez Marin, NCI Agency

Cybersecurity reaches far beyond processes to make doing business easier—it’s the “game changer” to counter real consequences that threaten everyday life, said Katrin Suder, state secretary at the German Federal Ministry of Defense.

“Cyber attacks are no more science fiction,” Suder said. “They are real and will become even more critical in the future. The trajectory [of safeguarding networks] is not going in the right direction.” 

June 7, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Estonian president Toomas Hendrik Ilves addresses attendees on the inaugural day of the three-day NITEC 2016 conference in Tallinn, Estonia. Photo by Marcos Fernandez Marin, NCI Agency

NATO is dangling roughly 3 billion euros ($3.4 billion) in funding for future cyber-based initiatives to match—and then surpass—the increasingly sophisticated attacks against its 28-member alliance, officials announced Tuesday on the inaugural day of the NITEC 2016 conference.

Increased Russian aggression, instability in Europe’s south, the Syrian refugee crisis and evolving cyberthreats all have contributed toward new strategic realities, but also jockey for the same pot of limited financial resources—mobilizing the alliance to strengthen collaborations with industry for vital solutions. 

June 8, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Defense Deparment CIO Terry Halvorsen addresses the NITEC 2016 conference in Tallinn, Estonia. Photo by Marcos Fernandez Marin, NCI Agency

The key to cybersecurity woes might be found in the relationships created between government and industry, the Defense Department’s chief information officer said. 

Partnerships might be the "secret weapon to success," particularly in the IT world, Terry Halvorsen offered during his keynote address on day two of the NITEC 2016 cyber conference in Tallinn, Estonia, presented by the NCI Agency and AFCEA Europe and organized in cooperation with the Estonian Ministry of Defense.

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