Army network

October 24, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, USA, Army CIO/G-6, speaks at MILCOM 2017 in Baltimore.

The Department of Defense is seeing its adversaries utilize off-the-shelf technologies, mobile networks and commercial applications that the U.S. military itself is not using as well. With this recognition, the “winds of change” are beginning to blow through the agency. The U.S. Army in particular must dust off some of its aging procurement processes and leverage commercial technology to regain the advantage over its peer adversaries, warned Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, USA, Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6 at the MILCOM 2017 conference in Baltimore on October 24.

October 12, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
Army Staff Sgt. Nate Sanchez runs to assist a competitor during the Army Best Warrior Competition at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, on October 4. The Army is currently outlining plans to make its computer network more of a competitor on the battlefield. Army photo by Pfc. Miguel Pena

To say that the Army’s network needs an update is an understatement. The 1.1 million user-network has, among other things, 17 mission command systems—all “stovepiped,” designed never to interact together. Some of the systems were used in the early 2000s to fight a static war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

August 3, 2017
 
The U.S. Army is updating mission command network software and hardware, condensing more than a dozen versions to one standard baseline. (U.S. Army photo by Bridget Lynch, PEO C3T Public Affairs)

Beginning later this year, the U.S. Army will be updating mission command network software and hardware across 400 Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard units. The goal is to reduce more than a dozen mission command network software and hardware versions to one standard baseline. As a result, system complexity in the command-post environment will be mitigated, allowing for easier network initialization and sustainment.

May 12, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

The Defense Department's continued collaboration to streamline the whole of the military's information technology networks and systems, known as the Joint Information Environment, tops leaders' agendas and fiscal spending plans—now available with a caveat for decision makers, officials said.

February 5, 2015
 

Lt. Gen. Robert Ferrell, USA, Army chief information officer/G-6, has unveiled the publication of the Army Network Campaign Plan (ANCP). The ANCP is described as the overarching game plan that will drive the Army’s focus and unify the service’s effort to optimize operational effectiveness and increase network and information security while achieving increased efficiencies.

September 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army is standing up a cyber brigade and considering a cyber branch, which has some questioning the future of the service's Signal Corps, but the Signal Corps will survive, Lt. Gen. Robert Ferrell, USA, the service’s chief information officer, said during a luncheon keynote speech at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 conference, Augusta, Georgia. “The Signal Corps will be enduring. It will not be going away,” Gen. Ferrell said. “You’re still going to be required to build, operate and defend the network.

August 24, 2011
By Rita Boland

The generals who lead the U.S. Army's cyber force are responding to a diminishing budget believe that changes to its architecture already under way will not only save money but also greatly increase military cybersecurity. Among the first advances are the introduction of servicewide enterprise email-a move that will save the service an estimated $500 million-and the introduction of secure computer tablets that accept CACs and allows individuals access to the data they need. Lt. Gen. Susan S.

September 9, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The U.S. Defense Department is primed to take a first step toward the realization of the colossal concept of connecting its entire network system under the Joint Information Environment (JIE).

For more than a year, the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), along with the Army, Air Force and defense contractor Lockheed Martin, has worked on the joint regional security stacks (JRSS), a key upgrade to streamline network operations and, officials say, improve security.