network centric operations

July 15, 2015

3 Phoenix Inc., Chantilly, Virginia, is being awarded an $8,634,738 modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-6264) for continuing engineering services to support software development, procurement of commercial off-the-shelf products, and hardware/software integration required to provide improved technology for Navy open architecture and network centric operations and warfare systems in support of Virginia-class submarines, and other submarine/surface ship systems. 3 Phoenix Inc.

September 23, 2011
By George Seffers

3 Phoenix Incorporated, Chantilly, Virginia, is being awarded a $12,315,777 modification to provide engineering services to support software development, procurement of commercial-off-the-shelf products, and hardware/software integration required to provide improved technology for Navy open architecture and network centric operations and warfare systems in support of Virginia class submarines and other submarine/surface ship systems. This requirement includes system engineering, architecture design, software engineering, prototyping, integration, and test activities.

May 2007
By Capt. James H. Patton Jr., USN (Ret.)

 
Sea trial experiments demonstrate recently developed joint warfare capabilities, many of which could benefit from improved submarine connectivity. The USS Georgia was used in one such trial, called Silent Hammer, off the coast of San Diego several years ago.
Transforming old technology into new concepts offers potential to enhance the evolving role of submarines.

September 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

September 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Master Sgt. Pete Norris, USAF, a crew commander at the new Air Force Space Command’s (AFSPC’s) Major Command Communications Coordination Center (MCCC), reviews the command’s mission system network security posture on a heads-up display. The display facilitates tracking of mission system compliance with all security system updates.
Center to deliver network operational picture.

October 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

October 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Sweden’s experience in developing network-centric systems has allowed it to create an infrastructure that will provide its air, land and sea forces with a unified picture of the battlefield.
Close government-industry partnerships are key to integrating advanced technologies into armed forces.

October 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
For the U.S. Army V Corps, a team from the Joint Systems Integration Command installed the Command and Control on the Move (C2OTM) system on an M4 command and control vehicle (C2V). The hub is located in Heidelberg, Germany.
Commanders no longer have to choose between capability and mobility.

January 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Two U.S. Air Force airmen call in air support during coalition combat operations in Fallujah, Iraq, late last year. Network-centric operations are producing results already in Iraq, but key decisions lie ahead for the defensewide concept to achieve its full potential.
New challenges emerge as technology reaches warfighters.

October 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

July 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

July 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Navy F/A-18C Hornet prepares to launch for evening operations in operation Iraqi Freedom. The Navy’s FORCEnet program is incorporating network-centric innovations that already have had an impact in the Iraq War.
War lessons direct course as a new architecture looms.

August 2003
By Clement C. Chen

Ubiquitous connectivity may have hidden consequences.

As momentum grows for network centricity in military operations, architects of the plans may find themselves closely examining sciences such as sociology or biology to preview where network-centric activity can lead. When command, control, communications, computers and intelligence systems become more highly networked, the need for sophistication in the products and platforms that sit at the edges diminishes. In some cases, too much capability at the edge may actually inhibit self-organizing behavior and negatively impact the mission of the networked whole.

August 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Defense Department builds innovations from the ground up.

A new initiative by the U.S. Defense Department aims to speed the advent of network centricity by incorporating ideas directly from users. The result may be improved network centricity for small Defense Department components as well as new capabilities across the entire defense community.