research and development

June 2009
By Rita Boland and Maryann Lawlor

June 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

June 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

Researchers working with the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research have developed a method to spray down a film of carbon nanotubes to form thin, flexible electronics. These pliable circuits will be applied to a variety of soft materials such as cloth and plastic.

December 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

November 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2006
By Rita Boland

December 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Synthetic Aperture Ladar for Tactical Imaging (SALTI) program is studying practical applications for synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) technology. Unlike synthetic aperture radar, which requires trained personnel to interpret data, SAL can produce photo-realistic images.
Airborne light-based system delivers more detail, high data rates.

December 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

August 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

July 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

February 2006
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

 
The integration of systems and network operations is the focus in the Center for Innovation. The systems involved include warfighting platforms that project across a broad spectrum of requirements: intelligence gathering, missile defense, logistics, battle management and command and control.
Network-centric ingenuity powers robust idea factory.

July 2005
By Michael A. Robinson

An ambitious company president pushes to double his firm’s U.S. federal business.

If his eyesight had not failed him, Scott Dixon Smith might never have embarked on a career in technology, let alone one supplying visualization software to corporations and federal agencies. In fact, even before he entered college on a tennis scholarship, Smith already had charted a completely different course.

June 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

July 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Information becomes the manufactured good that defines productivity, economic activity.

The 2020 citizen returns home from an afternoon of outdoor recreation to resume work. Recognizing him as he strides up the walkway to his door, his house’s computers unlock the door and activate hallway lighting systems. As he walks through the house, environmental controls that are sensitive to his presence switch lights on and off and adjust each room’s temperature. Similarly, his intelligent clothing loosens and thins out for greater body heat dispersal as he cools down from exertion.

July 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Agency creates new office to focus on three areas encompassing a broad range of related developments.

Smart mobile mines, underwater attack trumpets and an artificial dog’s nose are some of the products that may emerge from a newly reorganized defense research office. The reorganization reflects a growing interdependence among various electronics technologies, according to defense officials.

July 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Enabling everyday appliances and components to relate to each other is the goal of an industry-academia partnership.

Virtually any device employing semiconductor technology soon may be able to communicate with its electronic siblings, cousins and even distant relatives. Research underway at an engineering institute, supported by private industry funding, aims to empower electronic components and everyday hardware to communicate with one another during the course of routine operations.

November 1999
By Mark Powell

Research laboratory offers solution to interoperability challenges created by multiple systems in battlespace.

Revolutionary changes are taking place in military tactical equipment that promise to eliminate many of today’s interoperability issues. A next-generation system that is backward compatible with legacy systems as well as capable of hosting new advanced waveforms could dramatically enhance communications among military units and resolve many of the vexing issues that have plagued past military operations.

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