language translation

October 17, 2011
By George Seffers

Raytheon BBN Technologies Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts, is being awarded an $8,448,523 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. The Broad Operational Language Technology Program has a goal of creating technology capable of translating multiple foreign languages in all genres, retrieving information from the translated material, and enabling bilingual communication via speech or text. Specifically, this contractor will conduct work for activity A, "Genre-Independent Translation and Information Retrieval System"; activity B, "Human-Machine Communication System"; Activity C, "Human-Human Dialogue System"; and Activity D, "Arabic Dialect Components." The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is the contracting activity.

October 14, 2011
By George Seffers

International Business Machines Corporation, Yorktown Heights, New York, is being awarded a $6,576,024 cost contract for the Broad Operational Language Technology Program. The program has a goal of creating technology capable of translating multiple foreign languages in all genres, retrieving information from the translated material, and enabling bilingual communication via speech or text. Specifically, this contractor will conduct work for activity A, "Genre-Independent Translation and Information Retrieval System," and activity C, "Human-Human Dialogue System." The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is the contracting activity.

October 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

A transliteration tool developed jointly by the intelligence community and a commercial firm is helping eliminate the problem of misidentified foreign names and places in databases. These types of errors can allow a potential terrorist or plot to slip though security if analysts cannot identify common proper nouns and establish valuable links.

May 22, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. intelligence community will be relying to a greater degree on commercial technologies to meet its current and future requirements, including some that formerly were the purview of government laboratories. And, because much of the community’s research is applied research, it will select its budgeting priorities based in part on how well the commercial sector can fill in some technology gaps on its own.

September 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

September 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

Because warfighters need to translate and comprehend more than just, “Where’s the train station?”

Devices and dictionaries for converting basic phrases from one language to another are common tools for travelers in foreign countries. But when understanding context, dialect and personalities offers the chance to stop an attack or catch a terrorist, official personnel need more sophisticated technology. The U.S. Defense Department’s premier research organization has embarked on several projects designed to give troops in any situation the tools they need to secure the spoken word.

September 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Google Translate has an app for the Android smartphone.

Europe turns to a commercial search engine to untangle Patent Office tower of babel through no-cost partnership.