smartphone

September 29, 2015
By Justin Marston
Derived credentials are the latest attempt to address the challenge of mobile authentication.

One ring to rule them all,
One ring to find them,
One ring to bring them all,
And in the darkness bind them. –
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

If you are not a fan of The Lord of the Rings, the executive summary is that you can simplify life and improve security for derived credentials if you only distribute one authorized credential, used by a thin client to access a centralized virtual operating system that holds all the other keys. For those with an appetite for a mystical romp through Middle Earth involving magical keys and rings, I suggest you place your tongue firmly in cheek and proceed.

September 2, 2015
By Jason Thomas

Over the past week, I have thought a lot about innovation. In part because I’m preparing for my upcoming panel discussion on innovation at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence Summit next week, and in part because I’m troubled by the seemingly pervasive use of the word “innovation” as a solution to many of our intelligence collection and analysis challenges.

September 8, 2015
By Justin Marston

"She’ll need a totem. Some kind of personal icon. A small object that you can always have with you, and that no one else knows. ... I can’t let you handle it. That’s the point. No one else can know the weight or balance of it. So when you examine your totem ... you know, beyond a doubt, that you’re not in someone else’s dream." – Arthur in Inception (Warner Bros. Pictures, 2010)

October 24, 2014

General Dynamics C4 Systems, Scottsdale, Arizona, recently received the Defense Mobile Classified Capability (DMCC) contract from the National Security Agency (NSA). As part of the contract, General Dynamics will deliver up to 1,000 Samsung KNOX-enabled Galaxy S4 smartphones provisioned with added GD Protected software for the U.S. government. With these new smartphones, authorized government personnel will be able to make secure phone calls and access classified email. With GD Protected software, the phone operates using only authorized software and applications from a trusted source. The company will provide system updates and upgrades over the air.

January 20, 2012
By George Seffers

Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia, is being awarded a $7,949,078 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. The contractor will provide a flexible smartphone mobile ad-hoc network, associated development, and test framework to ensure successful integration and validation of content-based mobile edge networking technology developer solutions. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is the contracting activity.

November 30, 2011
By George Seffers

Engineers from the University of Missouri College of Engineering, with funding from the U.S. Army/Leonard Wood Institute, are in the early stages of enhancing popular smartphones to be able to find and track military targets. The goal is to provide the exact location of a remote target, through either sound or sight using the technology available on commercial phones. The software application could be useful in cases where tracking lasers would be visible to the enemy.

November 4, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

From circuit-switched networks (CSN), to Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), to Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution (EDGE), technology has reached the point where it is now feasible to secure mobile communications. Only recent mobile devices-witness the iPhone-can keep up with security demands required for secure communications. The National Security Agency (NSA) is developing a midterm pilot program aiming for the end goal of a mobile platform developed using only commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components.