Homeland Security

March 1, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor

The budget’s not all that changing in the United States these days. As a result of less funding, computing, acquisition and cybersecurity approaches are transforming as well, according to experts speaking at the AFCEA International Homeland Security Conference. Some of the adjustments are minor tweaks, while others reflect a major change in the way the government does business.

February 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

An advanced wind turbine generates electricity in Illinois. The Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security, or SPIDERS, project aims to use base energy sources to power an internal microgrid that would be secure from external cyberattacks.

February 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Law enforcement plays a critical role in the homeland security enterprise. Officers combat terrorism in many ways similar to the military, and they have the most chances to interact with terrorists stateside by responding to crimes such as suspicious activity and traffic violations.

February 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

 
The agency’s intelligence office builds bridges with the law enforcement community.

February 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A U.S. Coast Guard reservist patrols the Delaware River near the Salem Nuclear Power Plant in Salem, New Jersey. An effort underway at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, is designed to foster better data sharing between nuclear facilities and state agencies in case of an emergency.

February 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

February 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Members of the U.S. Coast Guard detain personnel aboard a self-propelled semi-submersible (SPSS) vessel off the coast of Central America. Stricter identification verification processes at U.S. borders have led drug traffickers to use these high-tech boats to smuggle contraband into the country.

February 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A mock plane engulfed in flames is part of a simulated homeland defense exercise, which included the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) bomb disposal teams. The simulated scenario included a plane that had been flown into a nuclear, biological and chemical research laboratory.

September 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Rita Boland

National Data Exchange pulls together disparate records to aid the fight against crime and terrorism.

Law enforcement personnel are employing a new system that enables them to connect the dots between seemingly unrelated data in an unprecedented manner. The technology correlates information from various databases, allowing users to learn more about subjects of interest than they could with previous methods. Each increment of the system’s deployment offers additional information fields and introduces new tools.

Tuesday, September 08, 2009
By Rita Boland

 

During the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Customer Partnership Conference in April, DISA Director Lt. Gen. Carroll F. Pollett, USA (3rd from l), and others are briefed on the engineering aspects of the agency’s ability to uplink tactical radios quickly with satellite communications in a field environment.

January 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The STAR-TIDES research group collaborates with a number of companies, such as the manufacturers
of this inflatable satellite dish,
to provide low-cost solutions
to support government and nongovernment disaster relief organizations.
Open-source technology and techniques open new avenues for aid organizations.

January 2009
By Maryann Lawlor

February 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

February 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Coast Guard boat patrols Boston harbor. A port security system installed there for the Democratic National Convention in 2004 is a foundation for a broader harbor security system that connects databases and various sensors for real-time automatic alerts.
Fused data provides a clearer picture of potential seaborne threats.

February 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

Pages