business

August 2008
By Michael A. Robinson

Cyberspace heats up with both constructive and destructive activities.

Chalk it all up to Melissa, a computer virus that spread rapidly on the Internet and shut down entire e-mail systems. For both the computing public and the information security industry, the Melissa virus—named for a Florida lap dancer, of all things—was a huge wakeup call.

July 2008
By Michael A. Robinson

A new president is part of a major acquisition, scores new contracts.

As a young pilot in the U.S. Navy, S. Daniel Johnson liked the thrill of taking off from and landing on aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean and the North Atlantic. And yet he knew in his heart he wanted something more out of life—an exciting career in business.

April 2008
By Michael A. Robinson

 
Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne on patrol in Iraq are equipped with a Harris AN/PRC-152(C) radio. The company currently has a backlog of $1 billion
in orders for its tactical radios. 
Tactical Radio Supplier Adds New Defense Electronics Contracts

August 2007
By Michael A. Robinson

Company president predicts continued growth despite night-vision technology scandal.

Steve Gaffney vividly recalls the day he literally got a whack upside the head that gave him a lifelong lesson in success—one that would come in handy this year.

An enthusiastic athlete and varsity pitcher at his high school in Morris County, New Jersey, located 50 miles west of New York City, Gaffney enrolled in the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, where he hoped to have a strong collegiate baseball career.

March 2007
By Michael A. Robinson

A series of acquisitions fills in the franchise.

Running a key sector in one of the world’s largest information technology companies may not seem to have much in common with automobile repair. But one corporate leader draws from that discipline to drive a group that has undergone a complete overhaul since a serious breakdown little more than a decade ago.

As a high school junior in her native Arlington, Virginia, Anne K. Altman bought a 1968 AMX, something of a muscle car that was the first steel-bodied, two-seat American sports vehicle since the famous 1957 Ford Thunderbird.

February 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

Similar challenges afflict both, but communication shortcomings limit joint endeavors.

Despite common interests and goals, the military and the information technology sector are hampered by cultural differences that thwart their ability to work together, according to a former U.S. Defense Department information technology leader now in the private sector.

October 2005
By Michael A. Robinson

A billion here, a billion there, and you have a major government contractor.

George Pedersen always wanted to run a $1 billion company. When he started ManTech International Corporation on a shoestring budget several decades ago, the hard-charging executive knew achieving that level of market share would be a watershed moment for his fledgling enterprise.

January 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

High demand for information technology expertise requires innovative ideas to attract experts to public sector employment.

Federal agencies have formulated aggressive campaigns to recruit skilled employees during an era of increased need for information technology professionals. Forced to compete with private industry, these agencies are changing employment packages to lure qualified professionals into the public sector and meet departmental requirements.

January 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Shrinking supply, growing demand inspire companies to explore creative options.

The critical shortage of available technical talent has added a new wrinkle in the realm of proprietary information for corporations. Once reserved for the blueprints of jet fighter aircraft or new software programs, closely guarded secrets now include techniques used to attract the best and the brightest with education and experience in information technology sciences. In addition, the new corporate landscape is being shaped by policies and programs that encourage current employees to stay put, and congressional legislation is allowing more foreign workers to enter the U.S. work force.

February 1999
By Michael A. Robinson

Continuing telecommunications revolution contributes to company’s exceptional growth.

You could forgive Bob Beyster for looking on his company with dollar signs in his eyes. After all, the chief executive officer of a nearly $5 billion global technology empire expects it to double in size again in the next five years.

February 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Shortages of available, technically skilled employees influence curricula, while colleges battle the challenge of keeping coursework up-to-date.

The rapid advancement of technology is causing continuous change in academic institutions tasked with preparing the work force of the next century. An incessant and increasing need for technically proficient personnel has placed a burden on institutions of higher education, demanding that they produce employees who can handle information technology systems that now permeate virtually every aspect of the business world.

May 2005
By Michael A. Robinson

Chairman envisions the market remaining robust, predicts more mergers.

If throughout your entire professional life you had gone by a nickname associated with one of the towering giants of American literature, what would you do when you finally retired from the corporate world?

Why, write a book of course. So it will be with J. Phillip London, who got the nickname “Jack” while attending the U.S. Naval Academy in the late 1950s. The original Jack London was the writer famous for his wilderness stories such as The Call of the Wild and To Build a Fire.

June 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Service providers, equipment vendors reposition as converged networks emerge.

Major advancements in Internet technologies are shaping the future of the telecommunications industry. The very real possibility of widespread use of voice over Internet protocol is affecting the market and the way service providers and equipment vendors are tooling for the future.

The industry is in limbo as telecommunications processes are evolving toward system convergence. As much as telecommunications experts believe the market will drive the technology, they are also aware that policies must be formulated to curb reckless technology development.

June 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Creative thinkers learn from experts and each other to bring winning goods, services to virtual market.

Entrepreneurs aiming to take advantage of the opportunities the Internet offers are benefiting from a proven approach to fostering successful businesses. Affordable office space, venture capital and experienced mentors are helping the first wave of computer-comfortable visionaries realize their dreams while opening up a whole new world of alternatives to traditional marketing.

June 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Company officials advised to take aggressive steps to ensure only legitimate programs reside on their electronic premises.

June 1999
By Michael A. Robinson

Company making gradual shift from defense dollars to commercial markets.

Letting people know whether to expect rain, sleet or snow for tomorrow morning’s commute may not seem to have much in common with providing technological expertise for the Trident submarine, Minuteman missile or the space shuttle, but Evan Hineman has a way of pulling it all together.

August 1999
By Michael A. Robinson

Pursuing federal information system projects causes no strain to a company flush with business experience and acquisitions.

Dealing with the Byzantine operations of the Internal Revenue Service leaves a lot of executives feeling taxed—but not Van B. Honeycutt.  Instead, the chairman, president and chief executive officer of Computer Sciences Corporation, El Segundo, California, says his company’s lead role in a 10- to 15-year contract to overhaul the federal tax agency’s information infrastructure underscores a series of dramatic changes he helped plan 10 years ago. They include more work with Fortune 500 companies and rapid growth through acquisitions.

October 1999
By Henry S. Kenyon

A California-based firm is cashing in years of military communications experience to enter commercial markets.

Technology derived from military signal analysis work is producing testing equipment for wideband applications in the private sector. These devices are capable of both storing and analyzing large amounts of data while generating a variety of broadcast waveforms.

October 1999
By Michael A. Robinson

Information technology leader refines focus, returns to its roots to pursue federal projects.

If anyone can explain the principles behind the flight path of a boomerang, it is Dr. Edward H. Bersoff. Not only is Bersoff president, chief executive officer and founder of BTG Incorporated, a leading information technology company based in Fairfax, Virginia, but he also holds a doctoral degree in mathematics from New York University and is a former U.S. Army officer assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

April 2000
By Michael A. Robinson

Extra revenues from expanded reach could total $200 million in two years.

Jim Robbins, the Harvard-educated president of one of the nation’s largest cable companies, was in southern California on a business trip when he decided to check his voice mail and got the stunning news that America Online had agreed to merge with Time Warner. The deal was not only the largest of its kind but one that promises to reshape how executives in a wide range of telecommunications businesses view the concept of convergence.

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